Hi Point Carbine Trigger Job

By Editor, Feb 8, 2015 | |
  1. Editor
    Has anyone ever polished their triggers on any of their weapons? Anyone ever removed the machining marks left by the manufacturing process that caused you to feel that grit feeling while pulling the trigger? Has anyone ever changed out the springs or connectors to lighten the pull? Some have, some have not for various reasons, and that is fine. There can be issues with any non-factory adjustments.

    However, in the world of moving parts, the smoother the surface, the easier it is to move said part.

    The carbine has a unique trigger system that has, in my opinion, two major contact areas that can use a bit of polishing. It does not reduce the amount of pressure to discharge the weapon directly, but I think it helps. It does make it a smoother pull feel and in return, it may lighten it just a tad. Resistance equals more pressure.

    This article will cover two aspects of the carbine trigger system but first a disclaimer:

    I do not recommend anyone doing anything to his or her carbine. Everything mentioned in this article is purely from my own experience with my own carbines. Hi Point may not honor your lifetime warranty if you do any of these steps.

    With that out of the way let me explain what I have done and the results.

    If anyone has ever taken theirs apart, you notice that the black coating they use is in a lot of places that I question. If not entirely coated then partly or you could say over sprayed. Not only that, but in this one particular area, the metal is not finished as smooth as it could be.

    hpt1-232.jpg

    This area has direct bearing on the pull of the trigger as the picture shows.

    Consisting of one moving part and the frame. The moving part is smooth, but could be smoother, and the frame area it moves against is not very smooth due to over-spray in some cases and the metals finish regardless of any coating material.

    hpt2-233.jpg

    It is this area I have sanded and polished resulting in a smoother pull. Now when I say sanded I am talking about super fine. If really rough, I start with 800 grit, and finish with 1200. I do this on the moving part as well but in its case, I put the sandpaper on a level surface and move the part against it evenly as to keep the sanding even across the entire surface of the part.

    hpt3-234.jpg

    htp3-237.jpg

    The frame part is sanded and polished a little different. I use a flat blade X-acto knife sticking the sandpaper to the blade surface as to keep its sanding properties as flat as possible as well. If you did not want to sand the areas at all, I am sure that just using rubbing compound would improve the smoothness of the pull as well.

    After the surface has been smoothed to my satisfaction, I then use a Q-tip and polishing compound, which results in a semi mirror like finish. Upon finishing the polish I make sure all compound residues is removed and lubricate the entire area.

    hpt4-235.jpg

    The debate goes on as to the best lube to use. I use Gibbs brand super lubricant to clean and oil all my weapons inside and out. Do not use this stuff on anything you want to stay tight; it is that good at making parts that can move...move. Example: Threaded barrel compensators, sights, and HP charging handles.

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    The second part of the trigger system modification is tricky. Again, to me, most all the resistance to the triggers 7-pound pull comes from the spring under the sear. It is major stiff for that reason and changing that directly changes the amount of pressure needed to discharge the gun.

    Finding the right spring with the right tension that fits just right is not something I cannot report on at this time. Mine remain stock although I did find some springs to just try out. This resulted in about a 3-pound pull, which is way to light for carbine use and I felt it unsafe although it functioned without issue. I believe something in the 4.5 to 5 pound area would be perfectly acceptable to me.

    Rob Goodwin aka cudaviper

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