General Paul Tibbets, pilot of the Enola Gay, dies at 92

Discussion in 'Vintage Topic Archive (Sept - 2009)' started by geon, Nov 1, 2007.

  1. geon

    geon Well-Known Member

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    General Paul Tibbets, pilot of the Enola Gay, dies at 92
    By Richard Goldstein
    Published: November 1, 2007

    http://www.iht.com/articles/2007/11/01/america/01obit.php

    Unrepentant to the end, as he was right to be!

    Thank you and God bless you, General!

    Rest in Peace.
     
  2. elguapo

    elguapo Guest

    Sad.
    I just bought "Fatman and Littleboy" the otherday...
     

  3. SHOOTER Z

    SHOOTER Z Well-Known Member

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    Sad indeed But I bet ya all the anti nuke kooks will be celebrating. His group the 509th composite group was based for several years at Pease AFB in Newington NH right by my old homeas the 509th Sqdrn
     
  4. Carpe_Jugulum

    Carpe_Jugulum Well-Known Member

    It sickens me that this man had to worry about people using his grave and service for protests. How the hell did we get to that point? This man should be respected by ALL.

    And you know if he thought that far ahead he must have been hasseled by some pukes all along.
     
  5. elguapo

    elguapo Guest


    I dont get war protesters: Got a problem, do something other than rant and chant, then go home to your life, free of all the bad "STUFF" that ready men and women stand to go up against. Do something more than just talk about it, if you feel that bad about it. Dont bitch about people who put it on the line for you, reguardless if you feel the need to spit on thier graves. Thank goodness for protestors, I have never met one. I am not saying, but I am saying...ya dig?
     
  6. Ari

    Ari Guest

    92 is a honest time on this earth... I read where he paid a price inside with some guilt.
     
  7. 1knight

    1knight Well-Known Member

    This man should be honored just like any other vet he saved untold American lives and these protesters need to go 1 day in the lives of a soldier then maybe they will change there tunes. These people never think of the lives saved its all about making a scene somewhere
     
  8. eqfan592

    eqfan592 Well-Known Member

    I can honestly say I've never met any war protesters like you describe, and I've been to many rallies. For protesters the rallies are only the most visible of their tactics. And really, I don't see how you can change anything in any political situation without "talking" about it. And honestly, it is a VERY small minority that have anything against the fighting men and women of this nation (this is today of course, as I have heard of the various horror stories from the '60's).
     
  9. .45acp

    .45acp Well-Known Member

    I've had the pleasure of meeting the general.
    The MAAM has a WW2 weekend every year and I met him there.
     
  10. Loopster

    Loopster Well-Known Member

    Talking about important issues is great. The constitution gives us the right to freedom of speech so we can say that we think war and nukes and soliders are wrong if we feel that way (I don't).

    The constitution gives us the right to peacably assemble and to petition the government for redress. So we can march on the courthouse square, or on Pennsylvania Avenue if we want and carry signs that express our opiniuons, and use the power of the media to get our point across if we feel that strongly about a thing.

    The constitution that gives the protestors the right they have to protest only exists because brave men and women died to buy that freedom for us, and have been dying ever sicne to make sure that no one ever gets in a position to take that freedom away from us.

    With freedom comes responsibility, including respecting the rights of others.

    Where is the respect in cheapening a man's life by using his death and even his funeral to try to say that some thing that was done was wrong?

    In the name of human rights you can protest an "act" that was committed, but where is the love of human rights when the protests dishonors the "person"?
     
  11. steyraug223

    steyraug223 Guest

    here is how crazy the protesters really are
    http://www.breitbart.com/print.php?id=cp_fc6h5g7n673&show_article=1
    http://www.talkleft.com/story/2005/08/29/729/06956
    http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/US/story?id=1745591&page=1

    i couldn't find the page i wanted. someone sued this group from kansas, and won a 11million dollar suit. whats great about that is that is the total worth of the congregation. their church, their houses, their savings, everything. these fanatics are no worse than the terrorrists and really need to be deported.
     
  12. eqfan592

    eqfan592 Well-Known Member

    I don't disagree with your statements, and would never participate myself in any such "protest" at a man or woman’s funeral. I was simply stating that you cannot lump all protesters in to one big group. Yes, there are some whack-jobs out there (such as the axe murderer, who obviously had some other serious issues) but to imply that ALL of them are like that is ludicrous.
     
  13. eqfan592

    eqfan592 Well-Known Member

    Oh, and the protesters you are speaking of were not anti-war protestors, they were people who were going to soldiers funerals with sign's saying "Thank god for dead marines!" and so forth. These people thought that God was punishing us because we have gays in our nation.

    Here is the link:

    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=15876221