Pumping Gas - Good Information

Discussion in 'Vintage Topic Archive (Sept - 2009)' started by RobertoJ, Nov 9, 2007.

  1. good info found elsewhere, thought it might be useful......

    this info comes from somebody that supposedly has been in petroleum pipeline business for a long time, and they deliver about 4 million gallons in a 24-hour period from the pipeline; one day it's diesel, the next day it's jet fuel and gasoline.

    They have 34 storage tanks here with a total capacity of 16,800,000 gallons. Here are some tricks to help you get your money's worth:

    1. Fill up your car or truck in the morning when the temperature is still cool. Remember that all service stations have their storage tanks buried below ground; and the colder the ground, the denser the gasoline. When it gets warmer gasoline expands, so if you're filling up in the afternoon or in the evening, what should be a gallon is not exactly a gallon. In the petroleum business, the specific gravity and temperature of the fuel (gasoline, diesel, jet fuel, ethanol and other petroleum products) are significant.

    Every truckload that we load is temperature-compensated so that the indicated gallonage is actually the amount pumped.

    A one-degree rise in temperature is a big deal for businesses, but service stations don't have temperature compensation at their pumps.

    2. If a tanker truck is filling the station's tank at the time you want to buy gas, do not fill up; most likely dirt and sludge in the tank is being stirred up when gas is being delivered, and you might be transferring that dirt from the bottom of their tank into your car's tank.

    3. Fill up when your gas tank is half-full (or half-empty), because the more gas you have in your tank the less air there is and gasoline evaporates rapidly, especially when it's warm. (Gasoline storage tanks have an internal floating 'roof' membrane to act as a barrier between the gas and the atmosphere, thereby minimizing evaporation.)

    4. If you look at the trigger you'll see that it has three delivery settings: slow, medium and high. When you're filling up do not squeeze the trigger of the nozzle to the high setting. You should be pumping at the slow setting, thereby minimizing vapors created while you are pumping.

    Hoses at the pump are corrugated; the corrugations act as a return path for vapor recovery from gas that already has been metered. If you are pumping at the high setting, the agitated gasoline contains more vapors, which is being sucked back into the underground tank, so you're getting less gas for your money.

    Hope this will help ease your 'pain at the pump.

    5. Do not top off your gas tank, when the pump shuts off, do not keep trying to add more gas..................a friend who owns a gas station says that by doing this, you are actually giving the next customer a $1.00 worth of gas. The gas you pump stays in the hose and never makes it to your tank...........good to know.
     
  2. PrimalSeal

    PrimalSeal Well-Known Member

    When I get home from work, I'll try to add more to this post as I am in the Fuel career field in the USAF and I can give some technical information regarding the subject.

    Good post!
     

  3. pills

    pills Guest


    If this is true wouldnt you get the previous 1.00 from the previous user?
     
  4. PrimalSeal

    PrimalSeal Well-Known Member

    Well, in the interest of making this a good discussion thread, what is it that you guys have always wanted to know about the properties of fuel? Ask me anything.
     
  5. z71silverado98

    z71silverado98 Well-Known Member

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    if thats true should you only put the tip of the fuel pump in your gas tank enough to push the spring loaded door down. instead of shoving it as far as it will go.
     
  6. 1inthechamber

    1inthechamber Well-Known Member

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    Wouldn't it fall out by the pressure?

    If I'm pumping my own gas, I push it as far in as it'll go and let it run on "auto pump".

    If I'm out on a trip, I top off the tank and add gas treatment. I've gotten over 40 MPG (highway) with my '91 Imperial. :)
     
  7. neothespian

    neothespian Well-Known Member

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    Seriously....

    With all these "tricks" and what not that MIGHT save you, what, 6 ounces at MOST on a full 15 to 20 gallon tank is it really worth this much thought?

    I honestly think that most of these "tricks" are more like canidates for Mythbusters than actual gas saving tips. When prices are high, there are all sorts of attempts to beat the system. But, when it comes down to it, a freshly tuned car that has to work less to get from point a to point b will always win out.
     
  8. nicadflyer

    nicadflyer Well-Known Member

    Tomorrow I will give out some tips for saving gas while driving.
     
  9. elguapo

    elguapo Guest

    Not only that, but driving habits DO impact MPG. Even I can attest to that, myself.
     
  10. SHOOTER Z

    SHOOTER Z Well-Known Member

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    2. If a tanker truck is filling the station's tank at the time you want to buy gas, do not fill up; most likely dirt and sludge in the tank is being stirred up when gas is being delivered, and you might be transferring that dirt from the bottom of their tank into your car's tank.


    This one is an absolute true. I used to work at gas stations and most times gas was delivered at night when we were closed for this very reason.

    3. Fill up when your gas tank is half-full (or half-empty), because the more gas you have in your tank the less air there is and gasoline evaporates rapidly, especially when it's warm. (Gasoline storage tanks have an internal floating 'roof' membrane to act as a barrier between the gas and the atmosphere, thereby minimizing evaporation.)


    Also good in cold weather keep tank full keeps out condensation and keeps fuel lines from freezing. Had a sister once who would NEVER put dry gas in during winter then we had a cold snap and her car froze up from that point on she remembers the dry gas every winter
     
  11. 1inthechamber

    1inthechamber Well-Known Member

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    She should try gas antifreeze.
     
  12. SHOOTER Z

    SHOOTER Z Well-Known Member

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    That's what Dry gas is.
     
  13. 1inthechamber

    1inthechamber Well-Known Member

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    LOL Oh. I never heard it called that before.
     
  14. minidriver

    minidriver Well-Known Member

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    yeah,,,,, fill up when the air temp is lowest,,,,,,,,,, my wife's C-store has tank several feet underground,,,,,,, the soil around it makes for one LARGE thermal mass. takes a lot of energy to change the temp much at all. Feel free to com down to her store and check the probe readouts,,, they give temp readouts all the time.
    The deal about not refilling if a tanker is there has some,,,, some merit, as all the pumps (at least the ones at her store) are equipped with filters that are changed rather frequently.
    As far as the corrugated hoses for the vapour recovery system,,,,, no idea as we here in SW MO are not required to have that so we don't. But remember,,,, all newer cars (like after 1975) have a carbon canister that is part of a vapour recovery system. some of that vaporized fuel is actually introduced into the intake manifold and burned in the combustion chamber.
    Driving habits,,,, as mentioned earlier in this thread,,, make a much larger impact upon mileage than when or where you refill your tank...

    And Please,,,,, don't march into your nearest C-store and start ranting and raving about the cost of gas,,,,,,,,,, the folks behind the counter have nothing to do with the overall price. AND PLEASE stop yer griping if you are driving some giant SUV that gets like 14 mpg. sell it and get something more efficient. Unless you tow a huge trailer for a living you probably don't need that huge vehicle,,, you want it. There is a giant chasm between want and need. I WANT a 50 BMG, I need a new roof on my house. Can you guess which I will prolly buy first?