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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I acquired two new guns today. A Winchester Model 94 Trapper in .30-30, made in 1981; and a Spencer-Bannerman Model 1890 top eject pump shotgun, at least 102 years old.

The question for the Winchester is "Should I shoot it?" It is 28 years old and has never been fired.

The question for the shotty is "Does anybody know anything about it?" This is what I found so far
"the history of the shotgun goes back to the Spencer Arms Company located in Windsor, Connecticut. Spencer Arms produced the first successful American slide or 'pump' action repeating shotgun back in about 1882. Production continued until 1889 when the inventor, Chistopher M. Spencer, ran into financial problems. The Spencer patents were then sold to Francis Bannerman Sons, a famed military equipment dealer & America's first antique gun dealer, of New York City. Production was maintained with Bannerman markings until about 1907."

And some pics.



Left side of receiver "F. BANNERMAN. MNFR. NEW YORK. U.S.A. MODEL 1890"

Top of barrel "SPENCER RPTG. SHOT GUN PAT.APL.1882"
 

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I don't see any reason why not to shoot the 94 myself. They are super common and aren't really anything as far as collectors go. Makes a great deer rifle though!

As far as that shotgun goes, even if it's not worth anything just the fact that it's that old makes it worth keeping IMO. One of those things you can show people or your kids/grandkids or whatever. Is it a black powder gun or a smokeless powder gun?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Neither will ever be sold or traded they are from a very close friend of the family who I call grandpa who passed away. That's how I know the 94 truly is unfired, he had it since new. And I do not know about the black powder or smokeless question for the shot gun; what I wrote is truly the only info I have on the gun.
 

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After some Googling around it seems that the shottie you have probably has Damascus barrels, which means it's meant for black powder. So definitely don't shoot any modern ammo through it, if you even desire to shoot it at all. With it being that old I'd probably just give it a good cleaning and use it for a wall mount or to keep in the gun safe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I believe I will use the 94 as it was intended. As far as the shotgun is concerned, I will clean it up and put it away for now. Does anyone know a very knowledgable gun smith or guru in the NC, SC, TN area, that may perhaps know more about it or what it may be missing? I think it is suppose to have a wooden foregrip and I would like to find the year it was made.
 

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the shotgun is too old to be smokeless powder unless specifically marked on it. blackpowder only. you may want to post pics on some of the antique shotgun forums they would be able to give you details.

the model 94 is just a plain shooter, nothing special.

SW
 

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That shotty is most definately black powder only, smokeless powder did not become common until the early 1900's and even then it was only loaded to black powder spec's. Modern shot shells, even skeet loads, exceed black powder specs considerably and would be too dangerous to use in that old shotty.

The 16" barrel Winchester 30/30 Trapper commands a higher resale price than standard 20" barrel models but its by no means a collectors item, not yet anyway. The short barrel on the 30/30 would make a very nice low profile scouting rifle, truck gun, bug out rifle or perimeter defense rifle in the event you dont have a tacticool semi-auto. Soo.... get some ammo and enjoy shooting the Winchester!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I did shoot the 94 and is is a very nice rifle. Descent groupings at about 75 yards with the open sights. The shotgun is currently going to sit in the back of the safe, I'd really like to build a glass front box/frame and hang it up somewhere, but the thought of a break-in is deterring me. I would be heartbroken to lose that gun. If there is a way to display a firearm while still keeping it protected, please let me know.

Here are some more pics of the shotgun showing how the top eject action works.

Closed



Slide half way back (from top)


Slide all the way back (from side)



Slide all the way back (from top/front)


Slide all the way back (from bottom)
 

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that Winchester is of a higher quality than those made today. Handy little rifle! They're all right, don't fire the shotgun.
Tough way to get those firearms, but enjoy.
 

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I've got a twin to that shotgun, but yours appears to be in better condition.
I used to have mine hanging on the wall along with a couple other old shotguns, now it's just stashed on a spare room.
Love the Winchester, I've been looking for one of those but the price just keeps going up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I've got a twin to that shotgun, but yours appears to be in better condition.
Could you put up a couple pics just for my own curiosity, and I'd like to see if yours has a wooden forearm stock.
 

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I've got a twin to that shotgun, but yours appears to be in better condition.
Could you put up a couple pics just for my own curiosity, and I'd like to see if yours has a wooden forearm stock.
When i get home I'll try to remember to post a pic of it.
 

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As promised, here's some pics of my Spencer.




 

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Looks like a couple of nice pieces you've got there. I'd shoot the 94 & display the shotgun. They make locking, exposed gunracks (like the one in the livingroom at the Ponderosa or the Sheriff's office in Mayberry). I'm sure they make a horizontal version as well. If you or someone you know are good with woodworking, you could build a real nice custom rack with a glass door. It may be a bit of a duh, but don't do anything to remove the petina from the shotgun. A little (very little) 0000 steel wool is ok to remove light pitting & rust scale, but too much will detract from its value.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
They make locking, exposed gunracks (like the one in the livingroom at the Ponderosa or the Sheriff's office in Mayberry). I'm sure they make a horizontal version as well. If you or someone you know are good with woodworking, you could build a real nice custom rack with a glass door.
Yes, but glass is very easy to break. And I do not plan to clean it at all other than keeping the dust off of it.

As promised, here's some pics of my Spencer.




Can you tell if the front stock on yours is the same as mine; and I am just missing the wood?
 

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I meant you could build one with the bar to lock the guns in, and glass doors to keep the dust off the guns. The glass on my cabinet doesn't really get dirty. The only thing I wish it had is a bar to lock them in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I meant you could build one with the bar to lock the guns in, and glass doors to keep the dust off the guns. The glass on my cabinet doesn't really get dirty. The only thing I wish it had is a bar to lock them in.
Ok, sorry I misunderstood you, I will look into that.
 
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