200 grain lead in Hipoint .40 carbine

Discussion in 'Hi-Point Carbines' started by thumbs, Dec 2, 2014.

  1. Can I run 200gr lead bullets in my .40 carbine. I always loaded plated 180grain. I went to by some hard cast and by mistake I picked up a box of 200r. I found a load for them but am wondering if they are to much for the carbine. What I mean is will it cause undue wear to the carbine??

    thanks
     
  2. Bull

    Bull Just a Man Supporting Member

    All HPs are +p rated, so I'd say you should be fine...... The hardcore reloaders will clarify.
     

  3. The weight of the bullet has little to nothing to do with wear, sometimes if the bullet weight is to far off from what the twist rate range is it can cause issues with stability but you should be fine running 200 to 230gr bullets.
     
  4. rickm

    rickm Member

    All i have run in mine is 200gr swc fixing to start with the 230 gr rn as soon as i get the swc's shoot up
     
  5. Well that's good news. I was going to take them back but decided to check out some loads for hard cast. As it turns out as long as the 200's aren't to heavy they are the only ones I have powder for with hard cast.

    Thanks guys saved me a out 2 hours on the road.
     
  6. undeRGRound

    undeRGRound ROLL wif Da MOLE! Supporting Member

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    They will be fine! They have reduced powder loads, because the extra boolit weight will accelerate slower, causing a higher relative pressure. Therefore, they reduce powder, and this does 2 things: makes more room for lead, and same pressure with less powder.
     
  7. Yep. When looking in the load book the powder charge is pretty light. It also didn't indicate a compression load even with 4+ grains of powder. Pressure is about normal acording to the book and that was max. I'll be running in the mid range of the charge. My only concern, not now though, was the added weight would have an adverse effect on the carbine.
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2014
  8. Rachgier

    Rachgier Administrator Staff Member

    Thought you were working up for the carbine? I've run some pretty solid shooting loads with 200gr projectiles for my 4095. I dropped back to 180gr plated because that's what was readily available in my AO. I don't have my notes with me, otherwise I could give you a better response than, "Yup, I done did it."
     
  9. Your right I did mean carbine. I actually cought that and thought I corrected it but apparently I didn't. I'll try now to avoid more confusion.LOL
    Yea I hear whats available. I guess I am kinda lucky to a degree. There is a bullet castor, actually a factory, about an hour away. They had other weights but I picked up the wrong weight. Actually as it turns out they will be better than the 180's for me.
    thanks
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2014
  10. Rachgier

    Rachgier Administrator Staff Member

    I live in NY and most online vendors won't ship here even if the components are still legal to purchase. I don't blame the vendors though, I blame the politicians. As far as the pistol though, you can still work up the same load for either. Your velocity will be a bit greater with the carbine because of the added barrel length. I would just suggest, as I am sure you are aware, to inspect your shell casings with each recipe as you move along to check for signs of overpressure. +p rated or not, I would prefer not to have a KB due to my stupidity for not paying attention.
     
  11. undeRGRound

    undeRGRound ROLL wif Da MOLE! Supporting Member

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    Somehow that does not even bother me, Rach, coming from you. I saved this article about how even 180gr bullets are not really "safe" in a 40 S&W case, but it was mostly referring to factory ammo (and they cope with it just fine) and it's mostly a caution for novice reloaders...


    http://www.greent.com/40Page/ammo/40/180gr.htm

    The dates on the page (bottom) show this article to be at least 12 years old.
     
  12. Rachgier

    Rachgier Administrator Staff Member

    I'm sorry, I haven't had my coffee yet. What was your point?

    EDIT: I think I got it now, you should quote me more often so I don't confuse myself. Yes, I run the 180's because I get good performance out of them. Talon got a batch of them from me in trade for that bow and fell in love. I stick to my loading manual specs but stay on the hotter end of the recipe. If I can get the same velocity as the 165gr with a 180gr projectile and still maintain the same levels of consistency and accuracy, why not right?
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2014
  13. Ok let me ask this.

    I have the 200 grain hard cast. I have a published load in the Lee Modern Reloading book. They say the load should be (x)gr to (y)gr. of 231. At max load the say the pressure is 33200psi. I plan to load on the light side, at or under (Z)gr. Just want to make sure the carbine will cycle. If it will cycle under 3.5gr that's fine with me. These are plinking loads. I would think this load should be well below max pressure.

    I checked the loads for 175gr. hard cast and the pressure was 3400 psi and up.
    So it "seems" the pressure is the same or higher. I know the weight of the bullet will have an effect on pressure. I'm trying to learn something not trying to down play anything just trying to stay safe.

    Again seems the pressure of the 200gr is actually a little under the 175gr. I am assuming the pressures they are posting are max takeing in to account the different weight bullets.

    I guess the question is why is it safe with 175gr at 3400psi and not so safe with 200gr at 3300psi. Both are published loads.

    Again just trying to understand the differances.

    thanks
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 3, 2014
  14. Both are safe at the same pressure but .1 of a grain raises the pressure a lot more with the heavy bullet because there is less case capacity.

    My 995 will cycle (X)gr of aa2 behind a 170gr slug so I'm guessing your will work but only one way to find out ;)
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 3, 2014
  15. yeah the more i think about it i think it will be fine if i run lite loads. Now the pressures i stated were the heavy loads.
     
  16. Rachgier

    Rachgier Administrator Staff Member

    Sorry for the edits guys. I was reminded that we can't post specific load data per the rules.
     
  17. Has anyone run swc through their 4095? just wondering if they will cycle.

    looks like i put a little to much in also. Sorry about that
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2014
  18. Rachgier

    Rachgier Administrator Staff Member

    Yes, I have run FMJ RNFP's, JHP's, and 200gr Cast SWC's through mine. It has eaten up everything I've fed it. I've actually referred to it as "the fat kid" quite a few times.

    Edit: I forgot to mention the 205gr cast RNFP's I got from a buddy who reloads and needed a test run from a longer barrel.
     
  19. undeRGRound

    undeRGRound ROLL wif Da MOLE! Supporting Member

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    My point was that despite that article, you as an experienced reloader know what to look for and that was a very generalized article anyway. Ka-BOOMS in 40 S&W Glocks (unsupported chambers) and other wild cards are what drives these over-generalized warnings. A dedicated and studious reloader will bother to check OAL of special reloads, when pushing the limits.

    As for less case room (with a 200 grain bullet) {re: ThompsonCustom} that is definitely a big part of the equation, but the heavier bullet will have a higher pressure spike due to the greater mass taking longer to accelerate, also.
    Similar to a performance engine, with high compression. That same engine will react differently in a light car, and a heavy truck. The heavier vehicle will cause the engine to "detonate" and "ping" because of over pressure in the combustion chamber. Pretty close analogy.
     
  20. Rachgier

    Rachgier Administrator Staff Member

    Yeah, like I said, I was about two pots shy of my morning coffee. I've been dealing with a stomach bug that's had me camped out in the throne room with a wicked bad case of the bubble guts.