7.62x54r for Deer Amo recomendations

Discussion in 'Vintage Topic Archive (Sept - 2009)' started by Super_Virgil, Mar 10, 2008.

  1. Ok I am going deer hunting for the first time in nearly a decade later this year. I know that natalia, yes i named my mosin, has the power to take down a deer, but i dont want o shoot fmj's. Any brand recomendations???
     
  2. Honestly, that military surplus FMJ stuff will probably out perform any of the JHP ammo out there. WWII snipers and their kill counts don't argue... for long anyway... :wink:
     

  3. Check your states regulations, I know here in Okla it is illegal to use FMJ ammo for hunting, it has to be soft tip ammo.

    Wolf would probably be about as good as any other ammo for hunting.
     
  4. I have never lived in a state that has ammo restrictions for hunting... I didn't even think about that. Hell, if you're gonna shoot them anyway, what difference does it make what bullet you use?
     
  5. It basically is that the soft tip will expand better and give more of a chance of a clean kill, while the FMJ can just pass right through and leave a small hole and not give a good kill.

    Its funny, civilians worry about clean kills with animals but armies have no problems shooting people with FMJ ammo
     
  6. Under the Geneva Convention, JHP rounds are illegal... :roll:
     
  7. Carbin8r

    Carbin8r Member

    That's actually a common misbelief which I also heald until being corrected:

    The Hague Convention of 1899, Declaration III, prohibits the use in warfare of bullets that easily expand or flatten in the body. This is often incorrectly believed to be prohibited in the Geneva Conventions, but it significantly predates those conventions, and is in fact a continuance of the St. Petersburg Declaration of 1868, which banned exploding projectiles of less than 400 grams, and weapons designed to aggravate injured soldiers or make their death inevitable. NATO members do not use small arms ammunition which is prohibited by the Hague Convention.

    Despite the ban on military use, hollow-point bullets are one of the most common types of civilian and police ammunition, due largely to the reduced risk of bystanders being hit by over-penetrating or ricocheted bullets, and the increased speed of incapacitation. In many jurisdictions, it is illegal to hunt game with ammunition that does not expand, and some target ranges forbid full metal jacket ammunition. Some indoor shooting ranges prohibit the use of hollow points, as the rounds can create shrapnel.



    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hollow_point_bullet
     
  8. Well, then someone must have made a misprint, cuz in my Airman's Manual, it states

    "Under the Geneva Convention, use of expanding hollow point bullets are illegal in warfare."
     
  9. JasonJ

    JasonJ Member

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    maybe both are true.
     
  10. They used to tell us that the M2 .50 cal was illegal to use on infantry, so you were instructed to engage his field gear instead :?

    So much for rules
     
  11. Mike_AZ

    Mike_AZ U.S.S. Member

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    You mean other than New Mexico? ;) From http://wildlife.state.nm.us/publications/documents/rib/2008/BigGame.pdf

    Ammunition
    Hunters may use only soft-nosed or hollow-point bullets. Fullmetal-
    jacketed and tracer bullets are not legal. Use of sabots in
    muzzleloading rifles, except restricted muzzleloaders, is legal. See
    page 6 for definition of restricted muzzleloaders.

    It Is Illegal to:

    • Use tracer or full-metal-jacketed ammunition to take or try to take
    game mammals, game birds or protected furbearers.
     
  12. Yeah well, since the draw hunts are so effed up in this state, the only thing I've ever been able to hunt is Turkey and Mourning doves. If I ever do get a chance to draw a hunt tag, most likely it will be an archery hunt, so ammo restrictions don't really matter do they?

    It takes years in this state to draw a rifle tag or an "any legal sporting arm" tag. So, therefore I didn't have a need to know that law. Regardless of what the NM law states, after looking through my ammo cache, all I have for my hunting rifles are hollow points, so I guess I am covered anyway. Thanks for the heads up though, that's definately need to know info... :D
     
  13. neothespian

    neothespian Member

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    That's if you have the "fortune" (not that it's much of one" to be fighting in a war that honours such conventions.

    Otherwise, from experience when I was a kid, the less-well funded side uses whatever it can grab.

    Interesting how the Geneva conventions were quite the point back in the day, but these days who knows what forces are going to be up against. Also, these days those who don't give a *insert explitive here* really don't care what the Geneva conventions say are still using "dirty" tactics to their heart's content. That, and it just happens to be that FMJ would, by logic, penetrate past armour slightly better than a soft tipped bullet. Convienent for the NATO nations in combat I say....not that I have anything against it.
     
  14. Dave_H

    Dave_H Member

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    Well deer are minding their own business, the criminals aren't. That earns the deer some leeway on ammo selection.


    All joking aside, I use hollowpoints in the guns that can handle it.
     
  15. GlockMan

    GlockMan Member

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    The Wolf Gold Line makes a nice Sotf Point in 7.62x54r
     
  16.  
  17. Ok to answer your original question, the Missouri fish and game says:
    1. That the bullet must be an expanding type bullet.
    2. That Full hard metal case projectiles are prohibited.

    You can download that manual here:

    http://mdc.mo.gov/hunt/deer/genregs.htm

    As far as if soft points are allowed, it seems like you would be safe to use them. Check with your local Fish and Game to double check. I have not seen an actual hollow point in 7.62x54 or any other type of hunting point except the soft point.
     
  18. Yes it is a misprint.

    "The Hague Convention of 1899, Declaration III, prohibits the use in warfare of bullets that easily expand or flatten in the body.[4] This is often incorrectly believed to be prohibited in the Geneva Conventions, but it significantly predates those conventions, and is in fact a continuance of the St. Petersburg Declaration of 1868, which banned exploding projectiles of less than 400 grams, and weapons designed to aggravate injured soldiers or make their death inevitable. NATO members do not use small arms ammunition which is prohibited by the Hague Convention."

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hollow_point_bullet
     
  19. It makes a difference when that little guy in green asks to see your license, ammo, and gun while he is leaning against your truck when you walk out of the woods.

    Silver bracelets, loss of licenses, and fines are so not cool.
     
  20. Wolf S&B and Winchester I know make SPs but Ive never used them.