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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
There was a series of events in the 1660s centered around New Haven Connecticut that is responsible for the belief of some of the founders that these events marked the beginning of the American Revolution and the assurance it would be successful. As it turned out it was a valid belief.

This series of events was caused by the execution of King Charles I and the Reformation. For no other reward than bragging rights can you tell us what those events were and the names of the three men primarily involved? For extra ego boosts can you say why it was so remarkable?
 

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In 1661, the judges who had signed the death warrant of Charles I of England
Charles I of England

Charles I was List of English monarchs, List of monarchs of Scotland and King of Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his capital punishment on 30 January 1649....
in 1649 were pursued by Charles II
Charles II of England

Charles II was the Monarchy of Kingdom of England, Kingdom of Scotland, and Kingdom of Ireland.His father Charles I of England Regicide#The regicide of Charles I of England at Palace of Whitehall on 30 January 1649, at the climax of the English Civil War....
. Two judges, Colonel Edward Whalley
Edward Whalley

Edward Whalley was an England military leader during the English Civil War, and was one of the regicide#The Regicide of Charles I of England who signed the death warrant of Charles I of England....
and Colonel William Goffe
William Goffe

William Goffe was an England roundhead. Goffe's political aims appear not to have gone much beyond fighting "to pull down Charles I of England and set up Oliver Cromwell"....
, fled to New Haven to seek refuge from the king's forces. John Davenport arranged for these "Regicides
Regicide

The broad definition of regicide is the deliberate killing of a monarch, or the person responsible for the killing of a monarch. In a narrower sense, in the United Kingdom tradition, it refers to the judicial execution of a king after alleged due process of law....
" to hide in the West Rock hills northwest of the town. A third judge, John Dixwell
John Dixwell

John Dixwell was one of the judges who tried King Charles I of England and condemned him to death.He was born at Broome Park, Kent. He became a colonel in the Parliamentary army and was active on various county committees....
, joined the other regicides at a later time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Excellent work guys!! Impressive not a lot of people know about this.

Now can any one tell us why it was so remarkable that it was considered the start of the American Revolution and an assurance of success? May have to think about this a bit but perhaps not you guys are pretty sharp.
 

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Charles II felt that the governments of New England was assuming to much sovereignty, some close to him swore that the people of New England were all rebels. The king was assured that the Confederacy of New England states was "a war combination, made by the four colonies when they bad a design to throw off their dependence on England. The colony bad been coining and circulating shillings and sixpences. There was no recognition of England upon this coinage, which was begun in 1652 and kept up for more than thirty years, the money was called "pine-tree shillings." I've had a few professors argue that the regicides fleeing to the colonies and the subsequent "aid and comfort" given to them by the residents of New Haven which enraged the King even more and solidified the colonist against the crown and the hated Navigation Act was one of the first sparks of revolution.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Wow you guys are sharp going to make the next one harder.

That the three were never captured and even living openly under a false identity in one case even though great effort was expended in searching for them placed the colony in a state of revolt against the crown. Well done gentlemen.

If you would like more of these let me know I have a copy of a 1891 text book on the history of the revolution that is full of this kind of material.
 

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Sure throw some more out, fodder for my mind cannon ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Ok will do, bare with me I have the flu not sure what kind but its horrid went straight to my lungs, will dig something interesting up and see what happens.
 

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Ouch, keep that mess down there. Had a co-worker out last week with the swine flu, luckily they caught it soon enough and he did not grow a tail.


Get well soon man, and load up on Echinacea.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
In the year 1774, laboring under two misconceptions, the British Parliament passed a series of five acts for regulating the American colonies in particular Massachusetts.

Who introduced these acts to the Parliament?

What did each act seek to accomplish?

By what name as a whole were these acts know in America?

What were the two misconceptions that led to disaster for Parliament's plans?

Forgive me if this is too easy, I am crashing fast here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Yeah Ive got to hit the sack have fun guys check back tomorrow.
 

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In all that was the "Intolerable Acts" given the late hour i'll be brief and let someone else fill in the details.

Boston Port Bill was intended to close down completely the Port of Boston until the East India Company was paid for their tea and Parliament was paid the tax due on the tea. This backfired when colonist sent supplies into Boston and people marched in the streets.

The Massachusetts Government Act declared that members of the Massachusetts Council would be appointed by the Governor, not elected by the Assembly. Also, town meetings could take place only with the Governor's permission. This act gave the governor full power to appoint local officials and the judiciary, and decreed that in the future, juries would be appointed by the sheriffs, not elected.

The Administration of Justice Act provided that any British official serving in the colonies, who was accused of a capital offense could be removed from the colony and sent to another colony or to England for a fair trial.

Quartering Act for the British Army, colonial citizens would be required to house and feed, in their private homes, British officers and troops.

The Quebec Act, which gave assurances to Catholics of religious freedom, the kicker was it ceded large areas of land to France which the colonist saw as an attempt to re-fire the embers of the French Indian war.
 

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Forgot about this thread, and leadslinger beat me to it... Good job!
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Good deal thought those two would go quickly and they did.

Now only remaining is who introduced them into parliament and what were the misconceptions held by the British.

Man this flu is a beech and a half.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Ok Lord North introduced the "Intolerable Acts" into Parliament

The Misconceptions were

1. The colonists of Mass would not fight
2. Even if they did the other colonies would not support Mass

Slight under estimation, in a year there would be open conflict and the battle of Concord.
 
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