Anti-Theft

Discussion in 'Lounge' started by Flyboy, Mar 5, 2016.

  1. So...what the point of an anti-theft system on a stereo?
    Both my Honda and Ford have one, where if you disconnect the stereo from the battery, you need to enter a code upon reconnecting it, to prove you're the owner and such.
    So I just replaced the battery in my Ford, and the code prompt came up. Normally it's written in the owner's manual (which most people keep in their cars with them, so that's strike one). Mine however had been ripped out by a previous owner. So I didn't have it. Now, Honda in the UK has a rule where as long as you are a dealer of vehicles (as in, doesn't matter what you sell), if you sell a Honda, you can give the code to a customer. Ford on the other hand says it has to be a Ford dealer. Which the dealer I bought my car from is not. Well, it's Saturday, and because this is the UK, where the free market is viewed as a disgusting side-product of the dirty thing capitalism is, most service centers don't work. So what did I do? I got the serial number from the stereo, Googled it, and had my code in five seconds.
    So tell me; why is this a thing when a Google search on the serial number will get you what you need?
     
  2. Maybe that is the factory code and there may be a way to reprogram itwith your own code.
     

  3. cicpup

    cicpup Resident PITA Supporting Member

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    Because there's enough people with no google-fu that the dealers can still make a buck.
     
  4. I checked on that, it's supposed to be an anti-theft code, there's no real way to re-program it without either locking it completely out or rendering some of the functions useless. You're SUPPOSED to be only able to get the code from a dealer, but now as long as you have the serial number, there's a million free code sites that'll give it to you.
     
  5. Dane

    Dane Supporting Member

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    You were supposed to have plugged in a memory backup battery into the cig lighter before changing main battery.
    Good luck on the code! Did the one from the internet work?
     
  6. Code worked fine.
    I didn't do the swap, my dealer did. I have a warranty through them on my car; any parts that were on it when I bought it go bad, they replace for free up to 100 pounds (around $150). So I got the new battery for free. With an economy this expensive, I'll take what I can get. :p
    Anything above 100 pounds gets charged 50% of actual cost and labor.
     
  7. lsi1

    lsi1 Member

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    Flyboy if it saves just one stereo its worth all the inconvenience.
     
  8. cicpup

    cicpup Resident PITA Supporting Member

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    Do people even steal car stereos any more?
     
  9. lsi1

    lsi1 Member

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    I don't know if they ever did.

    I know the detatchable faced cd players I had all had problems losing connection after a while so I never took the faceplates off. I think my ears still suffer from all the bass.
     
  10. cicpup

    cicpup Resident PITA Supporting Member

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    It was a big thing in the 80's in the cities when aftermarkets became popular. People actually started putting "No Stereo" signs in their cars just to keep someone from smashing the window. It's why detachable faceplates came into existence. I lost one in the early 90's but it was poorly installed and I left the car unlocked.
     
  11. Not in the U.S.
    The UK? Whoo-boy, you better believe it. They have a sign when you're driving off-base to lock your doors and windows and "secure your vehicle electronics." At first I thought that meant GPS, cell phones, etc. but no, the inprocessing police dude that did our briefing said that whether you got a '64 Mustang or a '14 Challenger, your stereo is square in the crosshairs. The city we live in luckily is pretty good in that regard, but it's not unheard of. Our Honda came with a factory tape deck, so I swapped it out with a new unit. Not long after that, maybe six months, I walked out to go to work, and the driver's side rear window looked weird to me; it was the only window that wasn't uniformly frosted, it looked like someone had smudged the frost on the window. Then I got in, and the seal on the inside of the window was separated from the glass. Someone has tried to beat the thing in, and the police told me they were likely going after my stereo. They usually try to get in and out without any physical damage (broken glass, dented doors, etc.) because passerby will notice it quicker and it gives them more time to get well clear.
    The fun part was that they said it's likely they didn't follow through because they noticed an envelope on the back seat that had my unit's name written on it. They don't like breaking into Americans' stuff because we're more likely to drain them of their lifeforce before calling the police. :p