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I couldn't find any recent post about the Gen 2 of the C9 that was announced 2 yrs ago. Any news?
 

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Rumor has it that they should be out by 10:00 next summer. By 3:30 next winter for sure!!
 

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I do believe that one is DOA
 

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I'd agree with @greg_r but quite frankly, if Hi-Point doesn't release a double stack pistol, I believe one of two things will happen:
1) MSRP will have to drop -perhaps to under $100.
or
2) The pistol line itself will slowly fade away.

IMO the guns are too large in a market that's being inundated with smaller and higher capacity offerings.

If Hi-Point resolves the double-stack magazine issue the new design could migrate across their entire lineup and it would be huge.
 

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I agree. With many and sundry 10-12 round compact 9mm out there at $200, the HP pistols at around $180 make zero sense.
The Carbines still make some sense, and would make even more sense with double stacks.
But again...$300 for an HP Carbine, or $400 for an AR? And yes....you CAN buy them for that, right now.
 

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I would get one just for the hell of it. But Not a carry gun. Just something else to go pew pew with. But at this point I don't care if it ever comes out.
 

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I would get one just for the hell of it. But Not a carry gun. Just something else to go pew pew with. But at this point I don't care if it ever comes out.
I like a lot of oddball firearms and own quite a few. Any HiPoint would be a range toy for me anyway. No one in my area except Rural King even carries new HiPoints at this point and used LCPs sell for as little as $179, used Security 9s can be had for as little as $229 (pre-covid they were as low as $199)... considering that average new price for HiPoints in my area was $159-$199 when you could still find them at the local shops, I think there's a closing window in the market for their current handgun products. I really feel like they need to evolve, but that's personal opinion.
 

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If Hi-Point resolves the double-stack magazine issue the new design could migrate across their entire lineup and it would be huge.
The type of magazine they seem to be working toward is notoriously finicky; challenging to engineer with more parts, angles, and machining steps than "normal" magazines. Like drum mags, they sound like a great idea until you have to design or use one. :)

That said, the Russian made 12-round mags for the IJ70 18-AH I used to have worked flawlessly.

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
 
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I like a lot of oddball firearms and own quite a few. Any HiPoint would be a range toy for me anyway. No one in my area except Rural King even carries new HiPoints at this point and used LCPs sell for as little as $179, used Security 9s can be had for as little as $229 (pre-covid they were as low as $199)... considering that average new price for HiPoints in my area was $159-$199 when you could still find them at the local shops, I think there's a closing window in the market for their current handgun products. I really feel like they need to evolve, but that's personal opinion.
Evolve into what? ZAMAK slide, poly frame guns are what their competency is.

What I think they need to do is to start selling "parts kits" so that the Maker Community can zoom up on the Low Point. They've been, literally, begging HP to do so and HP has been ignoring them.

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
 

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Evolve into what? ZAMAK slide, poly frame guns are what their competency is.

What I think they need to do is to start selling "parts kits" so that the Maker Community can zoom up on the Low Point. They've been, literally, begging HP to do so and HP has been ignoring them.

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
I think a competent double stack is the first evolutionary step, a more conventional one that doesn't require the finicky magazine design. From our other convo about this, I know why they went that route, but I think it was an unforced design pitfall that they should have avoided with a clean sheet pistol design.

As far as the parts kits, that would be a brilliant marketing strategy, kind of makes me wonder what their hesitation is. They pay increased taxes on every frame (firearm) they produce, you would think they could cut into those taxes by producing more parts for a home builder market and fewer complete firearms.
 

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I think a competent double stack is the first evolutionary step, a more conventional one that doesn't require the finicky magazine design. From our other convo about this, I know why they went that route, but I think it was an unforced design pitfall that they should have avoided with a clean sheet pistol design.
I think most of us agree, or at least see the advantages of a much more "clean slate" (re)design.

As far as the parts kits, that would be a brilliant marketing strategy, kind of makes me wonder what their hesitation is. They pay increased taxes on every frame (firearm) they produce, you would think they could cut into those taxes by producing more parts for a home builder market and fewer complete firearms.
Hard to say. While one of the core tenets of HP philosophy was to make a reliable gun that anyone could afford. They did that but the market and technology continues to change, making other products with more desirable feature sets closer to their price-point. One theory is that HP is still working under that strategy which simply does not include selling parts to people as a core business practice.

Another theory is kinda along the idea that there are some Fudds in important, controlling, positions in HP. Resistant to change, they have a fixed idea of what their product is/should-be. The fact that there's a bit of Tribal Lore that after the Columbine Tragedy, HP (re)designed their firearms to have a secret, hidden, SN which couldn't be removed and reached out to LE to try to make the guns more friendly for tracing/tracking/whatever. Further there was the whole "let the internet name our new gun a 'Yeet Cannon'" debacle. Both would certainly track with the Fudd theory. Selling parts to a bunch of online nerds that they don't really understand (or want to) fits well into the Fudds-in-control idea.

Another idea is that HP is feeling politically risk adverse. The whole "OMG, it's a GHOST GUN!!!! Ban it! BAN IT QUICK!!!" may just be something that HP doesn't want to get caught up in.

Mix and match? All three? None of the above?

Who knows.

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
 

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I think most of us agree, or at least see the advantages of a much more "clean slate" (re)design.

Hard to say. While one of the core tenets of HP philosophy was to make a reliable gun that anyone could afford. They did that but the market and technology continues to change, making other products with more desirable feature sets closer to their price-point. One theory is that HP is still working under that strategy which simply does not include selling parts to people as a core business practice.

Another theory is kinda along the idea that there are some Fudds in important, controlling, positions in HP. Resistant to change, they have a fixed idea of what their product is/should-be. The fact that there's a bit of Tribal Lore that after the Columbine Tragedy, HP (re)designed their firearms to have a secret, hidden, SN which couldn't be removed and reached out to LE to try to make the guns more friendly for tracing/tracking/whatever. Further there was the whole "let the internet name our new gun a 'Yeet Cannon'" debacle. Both would certainly track with the Fudd theory. Selling parts to a bunch of online nerds that they don't really understand (or want to) fits well into the Fudds-in-control idea.

Another idea is that HP is feeling politically risk adverse. The whole "OMG, it's a GHOST GUN!!!! Ban it! BAN IT QUICK!!!" may just be something that HP doesn't want to get caught up in.

Mix and match? All three? None of the above?

Who knows.

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
The Fudd issue is an interesting one, I only recently came across the whole North American Arms PR debacle with the owner going off on some portion of his customers and then not really apologizing for the worst of it. I think some people are so slow to adapt to the modern market (and the speed information travels) that they really aren't able to keep up. I guess the Fudd thing really comes into play here. Whether they are affordable and reliable or not, the HiPoint pistols are much more competitive with automatics from the early-1900s. The age of the SNS has been over since at least the introduction of the Keltec P32 and I view HiPoints more like larger and more reliable SNS firearms than I see them as competition for modern entry-level automatics. But, to a risk averse Fudd, a single action, single stack pistol that's proven in the market and still selling in sufficient numbers would be hard to displace from an active production line.

With HP parts kits sometimes selling for as much as a used complete pistol, I have to believe that the financial incentive is there for selling parts, but you're likely correct. Political winds can change rapidly and if HiPoint were to get the same combative reputation as Intratec had, combined with deliberately feeding the GHOST GUN market, that might just lead to more in depth attempts to put them out of business... or at least the fear of something like that occurring might be keeping them from taking that leap into a new market segment.
 

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ROLL wif Da MOLE!
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But again...$300 for an HP Carbine, or $400 for an AR? And yes....you CAN buy them for that, right now.
But ammo at 80c a round is what dropped the AR15 prices... no one is buying the guns.
 

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Calm, rational discussion w/ good points on a gun forum? Say it ain't so!

Ruger's MAX, the higher capacity Makarovs & Tokarevs, and the vaunted HK P7M13 are all examples of coffin mags standing in for a proper redesign of the trigger linkage. Clearly, for Ruger and HK to shy away from it, that re-engineering is far more expensive than designing a coffin mag.

Given HiPoint has released dolla bill hydrowrapped and the G1 Yeet Cannon editions, I don't see the G2 Yeet Cannon brand as a hold up. I think a reliable coffin mag across the wide variety of ammo that HiPoint users will stuff in that mag is not particularly easy, particularly w/ the fixed bbl and the relatively high slide velocity of a blowback 9x19mm.

Clearview Investments has some good prices on steel 5.56 & 9mm.
 

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ROLL wif Da MOLE!
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The Fudd issue is an interesting one, I only recently came across the whole North American Arms PR debacle with the owner going off on some portion of his customers and then not really apologizing for the worst of it. I think some people are so slow to adapt to the modern market (and the speed information travels) that they really aren't able to keep up. I guess the Fudd thing really comes into play here. Whether they are affordable and reliable or not, the HiPoint pistols are much more competitive with automatics from the early-1900s. The age of the SNS has been over since at least the introduction of the Keltec P32 and I view HiPoints more like larger and more reliable SNS firearms than I see them as competition for modern entry-level automatics. But, to a risk averse Fudd, a single action, single stack pistol that's proven in the market and still selling in sufficient numbers would be hard to displace from an active production line.

With HP parts kits sometimes selling for as much as a used complete pistol, I have to believe that the financial incentive is there for selling parts, but you're likely correct. Political winds can change rapidly and if HiPoint were to get the same combative reputation as Intratec had, combined with deliberately feeding the GHOST GUN market, that might just lead to more in depth attempts to put them out of business... or at least the fear of something like that occurring might be keeping them from taking that leap into a new market segment.
Lots of good points Bummy

1. Reliable DS magazines are an absolute necessity. They should go the route that so many have taken since the Browning Hi Power started that trend, probably more brands use that exact same magazine design than any other... nearly all European DS 9mm and 40 S&W handguns use the same body. Plus many US native brands.

2. Modernize the old girl.
The YC9 looks much more modern, it would be fine for 2022

3. (Kirk) cater to the makers...
It's already a gun cheap enough to customize and even destroy, so take it to the next level.

Here's my thought, one guy makes a sleek and modern STEEL SLIDE and puts it on an HP frame, or converts an aftermarket glunk slide... BOOM instant makeover. Then they will scream for the glunk magazines right after

I looked at doing a DS Carbine, not impossible but not dead simple. I almost think I could do it at home, but the linkage on the left(?) side of the receiver is the main hurdle. Then one could clearance the receiver for a Browning Hi Power 32 round DS and let the wet dreams begin!
 

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ROLL wif Da MOLE!
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Clearview Investments has some good prices on steel 5.56 & 9mm.
Not afraid of steel case.

The coffin mag, got any pix?
Does it look like the long nosed Hybrid Makarov DS?

They need to just pay Mec-Gar to do the mags, kills the whole flock of birds (mag troubles) in one fell swoop. That was always the biggest real problem with any HP, likely still is the main problem. We just know how to fix the stinkers...
 
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