Apple refuses to hack terrorist phone

Discussion in 'Lounge' started by SWAGA, Feb 17, 2016.

  1. SWAGA

    SWAGA No longer broke... Lifetime Supporter

  2. lklawson

    lklawson Staff Member

    GOOD!

    Apple's position is that putting in a back door would decrease security and open up attacks by crackers. They're right. I saw the story on FOX & Friends this morning. The eye-candy babe was blathering that Apple should be able to both put in a security compromised back door AND find other ways to keep us safe from evil hackers.

    This is the techno-speak equivalent of "the shoulder thing that goes up." It's clear evidence that she has NO FRIGG'N CLUE what she's talking about and should STFU. Her uneducated opinion is less than worthless.

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk
     

  3. MarkWS

    MarkWS Member

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    Mixed emotions. I don't have anything to hide and I'm pretty boring so if somebody wants to peek into my life they won't stick around long. On the other hand I can't imagine these 2 were mixed up in a "grander plot" against America so I don't know why they'd want to look for any data. The only thing I can imagine is they may learn how they missed identifying these 2 and if it helps them stop future terrorists then go for it. Frankly I'm shocked the US doesn't already have someone capable of hacking it.
     
  4. I agree with Apple, this is more about spying then it is about a shooting. We have already seen what happens when the feds get their hands on these tools, they spy on innocent people.
     
  5. SWAGA

    SWAGA No longer broke... Lifetime Supporter

    I'm no technogeek or Intel analyst but this digging after the fact seems a little superfluous.
    Like what's the purpose? Fill holes in a timeline?
    They dumped the hard drive from their computer. What makes the FBI think there's still something nefarious on their phone?
    Phone records can be attained under a warrant as well as all text messages.
    I don't see what additional useful Intel could be on the phone
     
  6. lklawson

    lklawson Staff Member

    It's entirely possible that there might be some data stored on the phone which was not stored anywhere else. Text files, spreadsheets, etc. A contact list doesn't actually have to be stored in the Contacts. There might be additional plans stored in a Word Processor file. There might be info about sleeper cells in a text file. There might be a geo-cache list of chemical precursors or stolen radiologicals in a spreadsheet.

    There could, potentially, be anything on that phone. Or maybe nothing.

    They have the right to look for it and lots of justifiable reason to do so. They don't have the right to force Apple to reduce its security posture, expose everyone else to blackhat shenanigans, and generally trample about battling like Bilgesnipe.

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk
     
  7. undeRGRound

    undeRGRound ROLL wif Da MOLE! Supporting Member

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    It will be soon, everywhere there are "security measures", there are
    "counter-measures" being developed. :eek:
     
  8. MarkWS

    MarkWS Member

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    Totally agree Mole. Everybody has to stay one step ahead.
     
  9. ajole

    ajole Supporting Member

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    I agree Apple shouldn't have to do it without SOME evidence that there might be some specific thing there that is worthwhile, but I absolutely think it's BS that Apple doesn't already HAVE a way to get in there.:rolleyes:

    Seems to me the way to handle this would be to hand the phone to Apple and say hey, we need this and that off this phone, could you get that for us?

    But what SEEMS to be happening is they want Apple to GIVE them the code or the backdoor, probably an issue with the chain of evidence and control of access.

    As much as I despise Apple, I don't think that's how it should go down.:cool:
     
  10. lsi1

    lsi1 Member

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    I find it hard to believe that the US government doesn't already have the tech ability to break the iphone encryption. I think this is being used to shove a manditory backdoor path through the court system to cause apple and others to have to make it easier to retrieve data from your phone in the future.

    They say its because the data will self erase after a certain number of attempts to unlock the phone.

    Now we are talking about one of the most advanced law enforcement agencies on the planet Earth If I can sit here on my desktop and think of building an iphone emulator that sends all the right signals to the data backup I could clone this data and keep trying passcodes until it eventually breaks them.
     
  11. lsi1

    lsi1 Member

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    what would be next the TSA looking through your phone while they jiggle your junk.
     
  12. undeRGRound

    undeRGRound ROLL wif Da MOLE! Supporting Member

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    :rofl: :rofl:
     
  13. Bamaboy

    Bamaboy Member

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    The phone info is on the cloud, which is a computer harddrive that you can get with the Patriot Act, so this fish story about the FBI needing the phone open is silly.
    iPhones update and back up to the cloud so its there and the phone is just a misdirect.
    And unless your a complete moron you take the phone to an apple store and get them to open it for you and yes it is just that easy folks.
    Come on people this stuff might fool the M generation but we're older and smarter.
     
  14. ajole

    ajole Supporting Member

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    Not if you tell them not to.;)


    Seriously? You think the cops/feds just take a piece of evidence down to the Apple store and let some tech dweeb tear into it?

    Puuuhleaase.:rolleyes:
     
  15. I see it as the camels nose under the tent that is on a slippery slope! :stir:
     
  16. SWAGA

    SWAGA No longer broke... Lifetime Supporter

    I can tell you nothing from my iPhone or iPad makes it to the cloud.
    Not from my home PC either.
    That has got to be the dumbest thing you can do..... put it all "securely" on a big sever 'in the sky'
     
  17. lklawson

    lklawson Staff Member

    I believe that there are still some of Kevin Mitnick's data files which are, to this day, still encrypted.

    Good encryption is just that: good.

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk
     
  18. lklawson

    lklawson Staff Member

    Except when it's not.

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk
     
  19. lklawson

    lklawson Staff Member

    Depends on my personal "classification" of the data in question. My grocery shopping list can go on an internet servers, no problem. Someone wants to know that I buy pre-moistened adult butt-wipes? Have at ye. My bank routing numbers I'm a bit more picky about but, let's be honest, they're already on a server connected to the internet.

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk
     
  20. lsi1

    lsi1 Member

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    I agree about the encryption being good but there would be ways around it. they may not be able to crack the encrypted data itself but that doesn't mean that they can't repeatedly try passcodes keys. As I said all they have to do is clone the phone try 5 keys till it locks up dlete that file and load in a fresh copy of the source data. since the iphone uses a numeric code it would be possible.

    They want to force apple to put in a backdoor so your average police officer can just plug your phone into a computer and examine your data through a basic search warrant. But of course law enforcement agencies have never ever abused their powers or maybe just simply lost a computer.

    once there is a backdoor what stops anyone from looking through your phone even while its in your pocket?


    Personally I'd like Apple to open the phone so that the fbi could possibly wrap up even more terrorists but I know that they would not stop there.