AR-15 build

Discussion in 'General Firearms Discussion' started by bigjohn56, Aug 26, 2015.

  1. bigjohn56

    bigjohn56 Member

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  2. It is not a bad idea at all, this set up would get you a decent gun at a decent price. But remember that you will probably have to add some cost to the set up: Shipping, transfer fees, dealer fees, etc. You will also probably want to change out a few parts: Grip, rails, add an optic, magazines, etc. Probably need to add another $200 to this price to get the gun home with you and set up how you like it. Still a pretty good deal, and if you have the money then go for it.

    If you are looking for a "good" AR, you need to build one from "good" parts. And in doing so you can easily drop 2-3 grand on some really nifty stuff. But if you are just going for something "decent" just about any parts (I'd stick with mil-spec) will do you just fine. You may not have a national champion gun, but it will shoot when you need it to and be lots of fun to use. For a vast majority of us, that is good enough.

    There are also some questions I would have about who made the various parts, but assuming that they are all decent mil-spec parts I would day go for it.
     

  3. missiledefender

    missiledefender Supporting Member

  4. moona11

    moona11 King of you Monkeys Lifetime Supporter

    Don't buy a composite lower. You can build one for around $450 to $600 with all mil spec parts shop around. If you want a competition gun or long distance rifle ya spend more on the barrel and trigger. You can get a BCG on sale $100 from Ares. Always buy the full auto BCG not the semi one its to light.
     
  5. moona11

    moona11 King of you Monkeys Lifetime Supporter

    Here's some I built for $500 each.
    AR pistol and AR15. Extras cost more ;-) Anderson lowers cost $39 plus what ever your ffl will charge mine charges $10 from a total order. I got 2 at the time. Uppers the same price as lowers minus ffl charge. Lower kits prices very but the parts are the same don't spend a lot on one. Unless you want a custom trigger which you don't need unless you are a competition or long range shooter past 600 yards. You can find good deals on complete uppers for $299 or more online. Karies? Or red barn have great sales. You will need the right tools if you build it from scratch $$$. Get a completed upper and you will save a lot on tools. And then you just need basic tools and a AR wrench and punches.
     

    Attached Files:

  6. sarahsmom

    sarahsmom Supporting Member

    Moona, what else would be needed? I am toying with the idea of trying to build one.
     
  7. talon

    talon the banned wagon

    Composite lowers are junk. Even with the minor reinforcing they are not up to the task. And you don't even save much money buying one.
    Do it right, by a REAL lower assembly. You'll get a much longer life out of it. If you really want plastic, buy a hard sided gun case to put it in when you finish building it.
     
  8. undeRGRound

    undeRGRound ROLL wif Da MOLE! Supporting Member

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    That upper IS Assembled. It's a PSA (palmetto state armory) econono kit, and PSA has a great reputation. But inquiring about parts is a good idea, like Jed said. I read the descriptions, looks OK to me! It is likely mil-spec but I'd call and ask, if they get back in stock.

    Looks like it is ALL There.
    Tools. You will need a punch set and an AR wrench/combo tool
    [​IMG]
    About the only reason you might need it is to torque the buffer tube nut...
    Punches and the hammer in that set for the pins in various places.
    Some long nose needlenose pliers would be good, probably. For the springs
    in the lower, and trigger group. An assembly vise or rifle holder is nice, but
    not absolutely needed. But one can be made cheaply with wood :D
    GlugGlug built one for like $0 ! :D
     
  9. Rachgier

    Rachgier Administrator Staff Member

    I love my Magna-Matic dead blow hammer with the steel, delrin, and brass tips. It has a removable steel dead blow slug instead of sand so you can store the slug in the handle when you need more finesse when driving pins or tapping a punch. I think I picked it up for around $40.
     
  10. sarahsmom

    sarahsmom Supporting Member

    Might have to do it one piece at a time due to money constraints, but think it would be a fun and fascinating project to undertake.
     
  11. Bull

    Bull Just a Man Supporting Member


    For some reason, my wife seems to think we should buy some IKEA furnishings.... To which I subtly remind her in a ten minute gripe/whine/plead, how badly I hate putting stuff together from little tiny frickin pieces... Half of which I'll misplace, a quarter I'll break, and the rest won't look like the pictures of them... Three beers and several profanity laced tirades later, everyone's pissed, I'm bleeding from at least two fingertips, and borderline psychotic....
    Hence, my desire to buy things damn near done!
     
  12. greg_r

    greg_r Lifetime Supporter

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    I don't see anything wrong with it, except that when I clicked the link, it says out of stock!

    Doubt it is milspec, if for no other reason than it is a slick slide. A closer look at the individual parts would be in order to determine that. At the end of the day, what does it matter? Milspec or not, it will get the job done. You will most likely tinker with it, when you do, you can replace the parts with milspec parts if you wish.

    I prefer some parts not to be milspec, namely the upper receiver, I prefer a slick side, and the barrel, I do not like a chrome lined bore. Agreed, they are easier to keep cleaned, but the come lining will magnify any imperfections in the barrel, negatively effecting accuracy. Anyway, I'm not shooting anything corrosive anyway. Make mine melonite coated!

    The forward assist? Never used it during my tenure with the Marine Corps, except to train. It simply was never needed. Besides E. Stoner designed a forward assist integral to the BCG. It has a scallop in the side, you simply use a finger to push the bolt forward if needed. Actually if a round does not chamber, I am not going to force it anyway, I want it out of there!

    My feed ramps? Definitely want those.

    As to the poly lower receiver? Agreed with everybody else. Stay away, too many negative reports of them breaking at the buffer tube. That's a weak spot in the design anyway.

    I learned to hate the M16 during my time with the Marine Corps. When I needed it it fired one round then jammed so badly it could not be cleared. The round missed the chamber and jammed tightly between the gas tube and receiver wall. When I tried to use it fir something besides a bullet shooting device it broke in half. Enough said about that.

    Took me a long time to come around to owning one, my preferred platform was the Ruger Mini 14, but I am liking my MSR's now!
     
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2015
  13. greg_r

    greg_r Lifetime Supporter

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    Nothing wrong with that! I bought my first one as a complete entry level rifle. Built my 300 blk upper a piece at a time, then my lower for the second upper a piece at a time, then my target upper a piece at a time..........it just keeps going!:D
     
  14. bigjohn56

    bigjohn56 Member

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    Both deals are out of stock already.

    Thanks for all of your input.

    My guess is that there will be plenty of deals going forward and with Black Friday less than 3 months away it won't hurt to wait.

    From the reading I've done it seems clear that the sky is the limit when it comes to upgrading parts on these builds. For $350 you can build a basic gun. For $500 you can build a nicer gun. But there is a 40+% difference in cost. Feature creep kills the budget.
     
  15. Atomic_Ed

    Atomic_Ed Member

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    I put one together just to figure out what all the fuss over the AR-15 was all about. Now I get it. Very easy to assemble and a wide range of possibilities. Even assembling the upper isn't that hard.

    That said, the prices for a fully assembled AR-15s are dropping quickly around here. Not much savings building your own when its all said and done. I'll probably put another one together, but I want to try my hand at finishing an 80% receiver.

    I would also buy pieces in kits. The cost of individual items will drive the overall price up.

    Give it a try!
     
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2015
  16. sarahsmom

    sarahsmom Supporting Member

    I would have to do it pieces at a time, that would be the only way I could afford one. But for me, this is 2 or 3 projects away. After I get my 995ts set up, I want to get a ccw (leaning toward a Bersa Thunder .380 or maybe a lcp). Then I want either a Mosin Nagant or 308 so I would have something long range. Would also like a JHP and 4595ts along the way somewheres. Then to build an ar. Oh, and want to get a 22lr that my daughter could shoot, also.
     
  17. planosteve

    planosteve Lifetime Supporter

    Sarahsmom, go with the 308. Ammo is a bit more expensive, but hunting ammo is a bit less than the Mosin hunting ammo. Ruger Americans can be had on sale for a bit over $300. The savage is a good inexpensive choice too.
     
  18. Atomic_Ed

    Atomic_Ed Member

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    :)
    Nice to see someone with their priorities straight :)
     
  19. undeRGRound

    undeRGRound ROLL wif Da MOLE! Supporting Member

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    The $350 unit will do the job. :)
    The $500 unit may last a bit longer... ;)


    This is where they get you! Especially with "packages", just like a new car.
    The fun part is swapping and changing the parts as the budget allows. It's also a big part
    of where the 'pride on ownership' and 'I did it myself' comes in. One could segregate
    the assembly steps into difficulty levels, like 1 through 5. Level One would be like
    changing grips and adding pic rail options. Level Five is more like assembling an upper.
    Not that it is so difficult, but a bit more skill and custom tools are needed, or at least
    make the job easier to accomplish. A LOT easier than doing many automotive mods :D
     
  20. bigjohn56

    bigjohn56 Member

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    The kits came back in stock so I bought one. Sounds like a good winter project. Will probably buy the Anderson stripped lower later today. Then start looking for deals on basic build tools.

    There seems to be a ton of videos out there on how to build and that should help.

    Thanks again to all who responded.
     
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2015