Armed Teachers Now Trained in 63 Ohio Counties

Discussion in '2nd Amendment' started by lklawson, Mar 1, 2016.

  1. lklawson

    lklawson Staff Member

    http://www.buckeyefirearms.org/armed-teachers-now-trained-63-ohio-counties

    Armed Teachers Now Trained in 63 Ohio Counties
    7:00am Monday, February 29, 2016

    COLUMBUS, OH - In response to the 2012 Sandy Hook Elementary School Shooting in Newtown, Connecticut, which claimed the lives of 20 children and 6 adult staff members, Buckeye Firearms Foundation launched an emergency response training program here in Ohio for teachers, administrators, and other school staff.

    [​IMG]

    Called FASTER ( Faculty / Administrator Safety Training & Emergency Response), the nonprofit program has to date provide high-level training to more than 400 teachers and administrators from 152 school districts in 63 of Ohio's 88 counties over the last three years.

    "The response from Ohio educators has been more enthusiastic than we could have ever imagined," said Joe Eaton, FASTER Program Director.

    "When we first announced that we planned to train teachers in armed response and emergency medical aid," Eaton continued, "some people said teachers would never sign up. But within days of announcing the program, we had 600 apply for training. In weeks, it soared to over 1,000. Today we have nearly 2,000 faculty members from all over Ohio waiting in line for a chance to get this training. And more are contacting us every day."

    The enthusiasm for this program has gone far beyond Ohio. School staff from 6 other states have attended FASTER training. In addition, instructors from as far away as Colorado have traveled to Ohio to see how the program works and take the idea back to their home state.

    Created by concerned parents, law enforcement, and nationally-recognized safety and medical experts, FASTER is a groundbreaking, nonprofit program that gives educators practical violence response training.
    The program is funded by thousands of small, individual donations to Buckeye Firearms Foundation, a 501(c)(3) charitable educational organization based in Ohio and the sister organization to Buckeye Firearms Association. Classes are provided at NO COST to school personnel or school districts. To date, no tax dollars have been spent on this training.

    The program presents a carefully-structured curriculum with over 26 hours of hands-on training over a 3-day class that exceeds the requirements of the Ohio Peace Officer Training Academy.

    The purpose is not to replace police and EMT, but to allow teachers, administrators, and other personnel on-site to stop school violence rapidly and render medical aid immediately. It is a well-established fact that faster response to school shootings and other violence results in fewer lives lost.

    2016 begins the fourth year of the FASTER program with $150,000 budgeted for multiple classes, which now includes a Level 2 class for advanced training in armed response, trauma medical aid, and crisis and emergency management skills.

    In addition, there is a new Level 3 class that takes place in the actual school district and includes not only armed school staff, but also local and county law enforcement officers, local emergency medical personnel, and other school staff who will be at the school when an active killer event occurs.

    "It is truly an awesome experience to witness an entire community coming together with the one shared goal of protecting the lives of students," said Eaton. "And many of the same school board members who at first chose to continue the same failed practices now are coming to us knowing they have to do something proactive about protecting their students from extreme violence."

    Schools interested in more information about the FASTER program should contact Joe Eaton at [email protected] or visit www.FASTERSavesLives.org.

    Media Coverage:

    Portsmouth Daily Times - Teachers receive firearms training

    WCPO (ABC Cincinnati) - Program to train teachers, school officials for crisis situations reaches 63 of Ohio's 88 counties

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk
     
  2. ajole

    ajole Supporting Member

    34,588
    10,897
    NE Utah
    I like it.

    BUT...and it's a big but...by doing this, the schools have opened themselves up as the one's in charge, so now, they need to administer things, track things, provide training FOREVER, including refresher courses; and are legally liable for "whatever", meaning they "might" be required to provide guns and/or ammo, and "could" eventually decide what teachers are allowed to carry, or not carry.

    Not saying that's "bad" per se, but it DOES open up a whole lot of avenues for budget requirements, risk management issues, and so on.

    Ours is simpler, but probably less "feel good", and possibly less effective. If you got 'em (and a permit), pack 'em.;)
     

  3. lklawson

    lklawson Staff Member

    Given the percentage rise in CC here in Ohio, I'd say that your method is more likely to put a trained and armed teacher in a school, perhaps several.

    But that might not always be the case. Social winds may shift and people may decide to stop packing. The fact is that there are a significant portion of people here in Ohio who get their CC but then never, or only occasionally, carry. And there is an even greater number, the majority IMO, who never get additionally training and seldom-to-never actually practice their basic skills. In an administered program, the concept that "someone" up the chain would ensure both availability and continuing education does have some perceived advantages as well.

    My preference is for your method, of course, but that doesn't mean I can't see both sides. :)

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk
     

  4. Not in Ohio they aren't and don't.

    Source: I taught for five years, still have my licensure and talk with lots of teachers.
     
  5. ajole

    ajole Supporting Member

    34,588
    10,897
    NE Utah
    Aren't and don't ....what?:confused:

    Seeing as it's only been 3 years...things will change. First time someone uses a gun, and people start talking to lawyers...things will get real.

    Source: 22 years in education, watching good things morph into stupidity due to unintended consequence and risk management, lawyers and liability.

    But I DID say it's only a possibility, things don't have to go that way.
     
  6. lklawson

    lklawson Staff Member

    Forgive me. I couldn't resist. :rofl:

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk
     

    Attached Files:

  7. ajole

    ajole Supporting Member

    34,588
    10,897
    NE Utah
    I can't drive...45.:p

    I keep trying to tell kids that I KNOW they don't think they will use algebra, most adults don't, but the fact is, they will and they do.

    The trick is, its usually the same algebra problem over and over, and we know ALL the shortcuts.;)

    Like carpenters use the math to square a door or window...but they have reduced it to matching the diagonals.

    Fleet managers know how to calculate the needs for fuel, fluids and maintenance, they don't sit down and do a different story problem every month.
     
  8. lklawson

    lklawson Staff Member

    <nods>

    I use basic algebra all the time. I use basic geometry all the time. But it's basic Jr. High algebra, not the Algebra I & II that I foolishly took in H.S.

    How many gallons of paint do I need to cover the walls?

    Or just today, how many grains of Benchmark = 1.6cc?

    Basic stuff. If I ever had to solve x/y = A/B I sure don't remember it.

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk
     
  9. ajole

    ajole Supporting Member

    34,588
    10,897
    NE Utah

    Umm...those ARE x/y = A/B problems...:p

    If 1 gallon covers 1200 square feet, then how much is needed for 7500 sq. ft?

    1/1200=A/7500. ;)
     
  10. lklawson

    lklawson Staff Member

    I must have had the extra cranky teachers because back then they told me those were x/y=z problems.

    :)

    Peace favor your sword (mobile)
     
  11. ajole

    ajole Supporting Member

    34,588
    10,897
    NE Utah
    Just remember, on multiple choice tests, when in doubt...the answer is C.;)
     
  12. bscar

    bscar Supporting Member

    do they have a list of which schools have taken the program? It'd be interesting to see which ones in Marion county are on board
     
  13. Tkaldahl2000

    Tkaldahl2000 Member

    6
    0
    As a teacher myself, I think that not arming teachers has the potential to save the lives of certain students. (Really just kidding here, but there are days when I would love to hug their necks with my hands.)