Bail out bag?

Discussion in 'Lounge' started by talex22, Sep 21, 2014.

  1. talex22

    talex22 Member

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    Watching a show on American heroes channel about the most daring raids of ww2. Talking about the formation of the S.A.S and their efforts in North Africa. They used modified willys jeeps that had bags that had essential survival supplies in then strapped to the side of the jeep in case it became stuck or inoperable. They called them bail out bags. Is this the first knows use of the term, and where bug out bag comes from? It is the earliest use of it I have heard of.


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  2. ajole

    ajole Supporting Member

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    They called it bail out because they were bailing out of jeeps, planes, etc.

    You don't bail out of a house or location. You bug out. It came from Korea, and maybe WW2.

    Bug out as a term can be seen as early as 1950, popularized in the Korean War (1950–53) in such phrases as “bug-out fever” (rout) and “the big bug out” (November/December 1950 retreat) and entered civilian slang by mid 1950s.[1] Likely originated in World War II, perhaps based on 1930s cartoons featuring bugs fleeing an impending foot or boot.[2] Ultimately based on the rapid, disorderly flight of bugs when discovered, particularly their scattering if several are discovered at once, such as under a rock or can.

    Mountain men used the term possibles bag. The idea has been around a looooong time.
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2014

  3. talex22

    talex22 Member

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    Okay thanks. I knew of the difference between bug out and bail out, but was just curious if the term bug out had stemmed from bail out bag as that was the oldest reference to a term of that like that I had heard. Very interesting info about the 1930s bug fleeing the boot. I had never though about it that way.


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  4. greg_r

    greg_r Lifetime Supporter

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    Interesting, never thought of it that way. A Bug Out Bag would be on my back. My possibles bag on a bag strapped over my shoulder. I've always kept them separate. Wonder how many frontiersmen combined them? Makes sense, except maybe a separate possibles bag would be quicker to get to.

    Bug out bag I always thought of as something to keep me going. Possables bag was to keep my black powder guns going. Patches, patch worm, ball starter, bullet puller, etc. And I'll add range bag, containing items to keep my modern firearms going.
     
  5. ajole

    ajole Supporting Member

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    Remember, mountain men used horses and mules as pack animals, chances are they didn't carry a back pack at all.

    But there are things you don't want strapped to the animal that falls off a cliff, runs off across the canyon, or buried under 60 lbs of stuff on the animal's back. That went into the bag on your person.

    Fire starters, supplies and tools for a weapon, basic stuff like a handful of jerky, a tin cup to cook in or drink from, maybe a pouch of salt, spare or smaller knife, some cordage, tools for your traps...all of those could go in a possibles bag.

    That's not much different from a bug out bag, the idea is, they WERE to keep him going, as those were the things he needed to ensure he could get everything else. We think we need a sleeping bag, or a tent, or a stove. They needed none of that, or they would use the possibles bag contents to create them. Need a blanket? Shoot an animal and skin it. Need shelter? Cut some saplings, create a wikiup or lean to. A stove? Nope, you make a fire, and use your tin cup or an animal part to cook in.
     
  6. wganz

    wganz Supporting Member

    Not so sure of possibles bag == BOB

    The possibles bag was the size of large woman's purse of today. And you've seen all the stuff that granny can put in that.:eek: The possibles bag was a working item for daily life of a mountain man that was living a nomadic almost Iron Age style existence. Today's BOB is more of a backpack with the goods needed to get out of a disaster/SHTF area to a safe area/home.

    Interesting enough has been the increasing popularity of Sling Bags that take individual load carrying towards the old possibles bag. Note this 5.11 Tactical RUSH MOAB 10 from the US Cav store. What was once old is now new again('nothing new under the sun' I think is what The Good Book says)
    [​IMG]
     
  7. greg_r

    greg_r Lifetime Supporter

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    That's the way I always thought about it.
     
  8. ajole

    ajole Supporting Member

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    That's kind of my point. What we think of as SHTF, they thought of as just another day in the life. They lived daily in what we would call a SHTF situation most of the time, with no running water, no power, no fuel, no law, no infrastructure.

    Their entire existence between rendezvous/town visits, and the time in their cabin in the mountains was in conditions that we would think of as disaster conditions. The possibles bag was to help them get back to the cabin, or back to the town, both safe areas.

    Obviously, it's not a bug out bag if you aren't bugging out. We'd call the thing that fills the same function in our daily lives a tool box, or a car trunk. But we have an entirely different level of civilization to deal with.

    We have the luxury of the way our lives work, with gas and electrical appliances, so the idea of living like they do requires us to make the distinction between normal life and life after a disaster. After the disaster, our normal stuff..the car trunk or tool box...won't work, so we need a bag full of the things they used, things that don't require modern stuff like fuel, electricity. We call that bag a go bag, or a bug out bag, to distinguish it from the normal stuff.

    The mountain man didn't do that. He had one level, no need to distinguish levels of comfort.
     
  9. Eh just call it your alien abduction bag. It seems to be accepted better by the Libtards. Not Liberals you notice just a small vocal percentage of them.