Hi-Point Firearms Forums banner
1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've seen a post describing using a stack of wet phone books to test penetration and expansion of various bullets. I'm thinking of setting up a short basement range and was wondering if anyone has experience using a stack of newspapers as a bullet stop? Stack, as in 12"-14", tightly bound or clamped in a wood frame.

Thoughts? Suggestions?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
799 Posts
I was wanting to find a way as awee to shoot my gun without having to go pay to shoot at the
firing rang.i have a small shop in the back yard but would need material to try to make it as
sound proof as possible.maybe we will get some great advice.actually im pretty sure we will,
thanks for making this topic!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
127 Posts
when i got my ccw, we did the firing test in the instructors garage/shop. his walls were 2x6 insulated with 3/4" plywood on the inside and outside, he then had drywall on the inside too. when shooting it just sounded like a hammer hitting a piece of metal if you were standing right outside. he had neighbors less than 200ft away and you could not hear it standing beside their houses.

for his backstop, he had... 1" thick steel plate angeled at like 15 degrees off vertical, then a couple pieces of 3/4" plywood, then 5 pieces of 1/2" industrial belting. His backstop was 4' wide and 8' tall. the wall behind the backstop was a triple wall just in case someone would miss the backdrop. He said he had never had a bullet make it to the steel plate. when a 22lr bullet would hit it, it would just hit the first layer of belting and fall to the ground. my 45lc went thru most of the belting.

hope that helps
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
for his backstop, he had... 1" thick steel plate angled at like 15 degrees off vertical, then a couple pieces of 3/4" plywood, then 5 pieces of 1/2" industrial belting. His backstop was 4' wide and 8' tall. the wall behind the backstop was a triple wall just in case someone would miss the backdrop.

This is a help. Thanks for your reply.

That is a super back stop but 'way beyond my budget and resource level. My "target" wall is cinder block, below ground/no windows, so I'm not concerned about escaping bullets. I do need an economical (read, cheap) means of absorbing impact and containing the bullet. I doubt that I'll shoot the .223 or 9mm indoors often. Smaller caliber and air guns more so. Probably the first shots after mounting a scope or sight to find the initial zero. Yeah, I know about bore sighting but this is more fun. ;-)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
26 Posts
FWIW, I'm lucky that I can shoot out doors, but the target I made can be set up in the basement.

Simple, really, I have 8 railroad ties stacked to 5' high. They will stop a 9mm at 5 yards, and I know they'll stop a 30 06 at 50 yards (I've done it).

Get 4 ties, cut them 4' long, haul 'em in the basement, two 2x4's attached to the wall where you want your target (or tie the 2x4's to the ceiling joists), attach the ties to the 2x4's with L brackets, and you're good to go (just don't experiment with armor piercing rounds).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
224 Posts
Do you have proper ventilation? The lead in the bullets can be a very bad thing to breath without good ventilation. The ventilation would probably have to be up to gun range standards. You might want to consider shooting steel BB's in you basement. It works for me. Just be sure that the entire backstop area is soft so that he BB's don't come back at you.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,862 Posts
+1 on the ventilation, just a few shots and the powder smoke will have you wanting fresh air. For .22s and airguns, Champion makes a nice bullet trap target holder.

http://www.midwayusa.com/viewProduct/?productNumber=744831

For your sitch, I would put up a few 2X4s mounted directly to the wall and then nail a sheet of 3/4 plywood to them to prevent spatter or bounceback if a round should miss or penetrate the other layers. For extra insurance. fill the voids with sand. Then put your newspapers, railroad ties, sandbags or whatever in front of that as the main bullet absorber. Just be aware that once a bullet hits something more solid than air they can start to yaw and tumble, often exiting the solid at an angle to which it entered. A hit on your box of newspapers could fly out the top and go through the floor above.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Just be aware that once a bullet hits something more solid than air they can start to yaw and tumble, often exiting the solid at an angle to which it entered. A hit on your box of newspapers could fly out the top and go through the floor above.

HHMmmm... Didn't consider that angle (pun warning). Seriously, you make a good point. I had considered that the 14" of newspaper would absorb all the bullet energy but not that it might cause the bullet to change direction. The floors above are solid 2x6, (actual 1.5") but I wouldn't want to trust the well-being of my wife to the floor alone.

Thinking, thinking...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
799 Posts
What about sandbags?wouldn't that make a great stopper?im scared to even try now where i was goin to
set something because not because the building is brick.my 40 might not go through brick i dont know but
i rememberd a long time ago me and a friend was shooting a 357 and he shot a tree we were infront of by like8 feet
and the bullet bounced backed and hit me in the stomace.didn't really hurt but i never told anyone.he's a sheriff]
now workin at the courthouse with a 45 i forgot what kind,it's been awhile but anyway go figure.hope he's a
better shooter now lol.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
26 Posts
You sure you're remembering that right?

I've got a 38sp snakecharmer (two shot derringer), and at 8', there's no way the bullet's gonna bounce off a tree - and if it did, seems like there'd still be enough velocity to do more than hit you in the stomach.

Wait, I guess it coulda been a rubber tree (sorry, couldn't resist).
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,862 Posts
I shot a .45 1911 at the side of a barn once, hardwood flooring was used as siding. Bounced back and hit me, hurt like hell. The boards were just hard enough, and mounted just springy enough, that the bullet impact was mostly absorbed by the siding and the bullet bounced back. On youtube there is a vid of a guy poping off a .50BMG rifle and he is hit in the head by the bullet bouncing back from downrange. It can and does happen.

Sandbags work, but after they get holes in them they leak all over the floor. ;)

BTW, watch the History Channel "Lock and Load with R Lee Ermey" episode on ammunition. He is firing rifle loads into gelatin blocks, the hollowpoints do some damage but when he fires the FMJ it yaws and exits the top of the block.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
On youtube there is a vid of a guy poping off a .50BMG rifle and he is hit in the head by the bullet bouncing back from downrange. It can and does happen.

I may have to re-think this low-cost indoor range idea. I thought that it might be simple to contain bullets with the right kind of absorbent backstop material. The post that I saw on the PAFOA forum in which the shooter used wet phone books as a bullet stop in order to test bullet expansion and penetration started this process. He was at an outdoor range so safer than indoors. Now I'm not so sure about this idea.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,862 Posts
Firing a firearm is inherently dangerous, you just do everything to minimize the danger. Bounceback happens because the bullet hit something it can't penetrate, the force behind the bullet is dissipated by hitting the solid material. The "give" or springiness in the material with possibly some residual velocity from the shot is what spits the bullet back along it's original path. Unlike a ricochet, the bounceback usually has very little velocity/power behind it compared to the original trip going downrange. Soft backstop material backed up by an impenetrable final layer is designed to minimize both bounceback and ricochets.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
224 Posts
You sure you're remembering that right?

I've got a 38sp snakecharmer (two shot derringer), and at 8', there's no way the bullet's gonna bounce off a tree - and if it did, seems like there'd still be enough velocity to do more than hit you in the stomach.

Wait, I guess it coulda been a rubber tree (sorry, couldn't resist).
I had a 32 round come back at me just this past week and hit me in the stomach. That was out of an 1858 percussion cap revolver. It bounced off a chopped down tree I was shooting at. It was just one out of 50 or so rounds I shot. Slim chance, but it happens. It just felt like someone threw a stone at me. Not a big deal, but makes a good point about always, always wearing eye protection. I think the biggest problem you would have with a basement range though might be lead poisoning and smoke inhalation problems unless you have serious ventilation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
basement backstops- my theories

If you keep your shooting to 22's and lower power, I'll be you can do fine, without a lot of money. Powerful center fire pistol, especially with heavy lead and full metal jacket, ups the price of being forever safe.
*********************************************************
Someone- Outers, or someone, made a 12" x 12" backstop that would take 22's pretty well. Angled them down into a little trap pan.
If I was going to stay with 22's only, I would put a plenty big enough area nearby (say Floor to ceiling & 16' wide) of 1" MSD (medium density particle board). The board is pretty cheap, darn heavy, and consistent in its ability to absorb energy. Those boards would be insurance, NOT your regular backstop. Put on the basement ceiling, they might accomplish the same thing. Get damaged, but you would see the damage and repair it, no house or people damage done!
Heavy steel plates could come in quite handy with center fire stuff.
Properly layered rubber, as in used tires, and known to stop stuff well, and reduce noise.
Would like to hear more on this discussion. I hear some on "mass loaded vinyl" helping a lot with loud music. You drape heavy vinyl between studs and allow it to disperse the sound energy while it is loose between studs.

Back to lead.... I've heard of people shooting rubber bullets, wooden bullets, and even 100% copper bullets, there has got to be away around the lead thing.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
360 Posts
Build a 3/4" plywood box and fill it with playground mulch the rubber kind. The key here is the bigger the box the better if you wanna play it safe you can attach a steel plate on the back and sides. If you want to try a sample to prove this works use a 5gallon bucket with a lid filled with the same rubber mulch lay it on its side and shoot threw the lid. On my bucket test 22lr fired from 15 feet went in 6in. 2 out of 100 rounds tumbled and came out the side and landed on the floor 5 feet away.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top