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The Battle of Gettysburg began on July 1st 1863. The battle ended on July 3 with Pickett’s Charge, in which a force of 15,000 Confederate soldiers charged through open fields at Union lines but failed to break through them.

This man gives a lecture on the Battle Gettysburg that I found interesting:

 

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Actually General Pickett’s men did breach the Union line at Gettysburg. Gen’l J.E.B. Stuart‘s Calvary had been tasked to make an end run around Gen’l Meade’s army of the Potomac and attack Gen’l Meade’s army from the rear, meeting up with Gen’l Pickett and splitting the Union Army of the Potomic in two.

Unfortunately Gen’l Stuart was stopped by Gen’l Meade’s Calvary commanded by Generals George Custer and David Gregg.

Had Gen’l J.E.B. Stuart succeeded in attacking Gen’l Meades Army of the Potomic from the rear, it is highly likely that day 3 at Gettysburg would of had a far different outcome.
 

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The same is true of "Sam" Hood's attack on Little Round Top. I had a Great-great uncle on LRT and a Great-great Grandfather on Cemetery Ridge. He was captured by the Louisiana Tigers, then rescued by the 10th Ohio. Oddly enough, my wife's Great-great Grandfather was with the 10th Ohio. Oh, and yet another uncle was actually in the Louisiana Tigers. Weird.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Had General J.E.B. Stuart succeeded in attacking General Meades Army of the Potomic from the rear, it is highly likely that day 3 at Gettysburg would of had a far different outcome.
Not from what I heard. I believe the Union forces had over ten thousand reserve troops waiting that they could have used to support the middle of their lines on July 3rd.
 

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Gettysburg is a battle that General Lee should have never fought. J.E.B. Stuart had been out riding around the Union army again and had not been in contact with Lee. Lee went into Gettysburg blind and dumb - no idea of what was happening. The Union army was in a much better position to get to Gettysburg and got to choose the defensive ground.

Seeing that the Army of Northern Virginia was north of General Meade’s Army of the Potomac, General Lee should have moved on Harrisburg. He could of occupied the city and forced General Meade onto the offensive. Could have been a great victory for the Confederacy.

Also General Heth defied General Lee’s orders in the first place by going into Gettysburg "to look for shoes". Why send two brigades into a town on a foraging mission? Two brigades would not have been necessary for such a mission, and indeed General Heth himself said it was a reconnaissance in force. Gen’l Heth knew that General Early had been there a day or two before. And there he ran into General Bufords division and rendered Gen’l Lee’s orders to not engage in a general engagement with the enemy void.

*a bit of trivia. I use the term "Union Army of the Potomac" because there was a Confederate Army of the Potomic. Commanded by General P.G.T. Beauregard. It’s only major engagement was the Batthe of Manassas (1st Manassas). In 1862 it merged with General Joseph Johnston’s Army of the Shenandoah and the two became the Army of Northern Virginia. *
 
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The same is true of "Sam" Hood's attack on Little Round Top. I had a Great-great uncle on LRT and a Great-great Grandfather on Cemetery Ridge. He was captured by the Louisiana Tigers, then rescued by the 10th Ohio. Oddly enough, my wife's Great-great Grandfather was with the 10th Ohio. Oh, and yet another uncle was actually in the Louisiana Tigers. Weird.
I had a great-great grandfather and several of his brothers in Gettysburg as well, but they were positioned to the north of the Union army. Probably had some kin folk positioned south of them too as my family had only migrated to North Carolina from Pennsylvania less than=n 50myears earlier.

A great-great uncle died participating in Pickets Charge.

And a loosely related to this discussion, My great-great grandfather’s brother was killed at Appomattox on the day General Lee surrendered. Sgt Ivy Ritchie of the 14th North Carolina - known as the Stanley Marksmen - was killed by canister shot during the charge of the Cox Brigade. He fought with the Army of Northern Virginia through the war. Was wounded during the battle of Bloody Angle. He was captured, interred at Fort Delaware and patrolled. He is recognized as the last Confederate soldier killed under General Lee’s command. Was buried in a National Cemetary in Petersburg under a headstone marked the 14th New York.

Sucks, doesn’t it?

Some years ago when the cemetery was being renovated there was a trial with the National Park Service where it was found that the grave did indeed hold the remains of Sgt Ivy Ritchie of the 14th North Carolina and the headstone was corrected.
 
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Not from what I heard. I believe the Union forces had over ten thousand reserve troops waiting that they could have used to support the middle of their lines on July 3rd.
Seeing how the Union Army of the Potomac had some 83,000 men in its ranks, you are probably correct. But then again, Pickett’s Division we’re not all the Army of Northern Virginia had either. It numbered some 75,000 men.

Just saying.
 
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Seeing how the Union Army of the Potomac had some 83,000 men in its ranks, you are probably correct. But then again, Pickett’s Division we’re not all the Army of Northern Virginia had either. It numbered some 75,000 men.

Just saying.
Historians - including me - love to play the "what if" game. What if Stonewall Jackson had been in charge on Day 1 instead of Ewell? What if the attack on LRT had succeeded? For that matter, what if Lee had take Lincoln up on the offer to command the Union Army? Bottom line - we can only guess.
 
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Historians - including me - love to play the "what if" game. What if Stonewall Jackson had been in charge on Day 1 instead of Ewell? What if the attack on LRT had succeeded? For that matter, what if Lee had take Lincoln up on the offer to command the Union Army? Bottom line - we can only guess.
This is true. And it is easy to see the mistakes made after the fact.

It is sometimes asked what it General Lee had won Gettysburg? In my opinion, not much. To capitalize on the victory he would have had to move on Washington. A move that would have been hampered by torrential rain. The move slowed the retreat of the Army of Northern Virginia, The same would have happened if Lee’s "victorious" army had moved on Washington, giving Union forces time to fortify.

General Meade was berated for not following after General Lee’s defeated army and destroying it. Again, the weather prevented it.

I got one of my favorite sayings from the poem "IF" by Rudyard Kipling. If is the middle word in life.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
For that matter, what if Lee had take Lincoln up on the offer to command the Union Army? Bottom line - we can only guess.
Likely the Civil War would have been over quicker if General Robert Lee took command of the Union armies. I think General Lee realized at the end of the war it was God's will that the Confederate army lose to rid America of slavery.

Looking through his history it is interesting Robert Lee married Mary Anna Randolph Custis, who descended from the line of Martha Washington.
 

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Likely the Civil War would have been over quicker if General Robert Lee took command of the Union armies. I think General Lee realized at the end of the war it was God's will that the Confederate army lose to rid America of slavery.

Looking through his history it is interesting Robert Lee married Mary Anna Randolph Custis, who descended from the line of Martha Washington.
This ^^^^^is a prime example of history being written by the victors.

General Lee inherited his slaves, then freed them by his own free will. By contrast, General Grant kept his slaves until he was forced to free them by the 14th amendment. Ever wonder where the phrase "Because good help is hard to find" came from?

Abraham Lincoln did not free the slaves with the Emancipation Proclomation. Read his words.

"Arkansas, Texas, Louisiana, (except the Parishes of St. Bernard, Plaquemines, Jefferson, St. John, St. Charles, St. James Ascension, Assumption, Terrebonne, Lafourche, St. Mary, St. Martin, and Orleans, including the City of New Orleans) Mississippi, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia, (except the forty-eight counties designated as West Virginia, and also the counties of Berkley, Accomac, Northampton, Elizabeth City, York, Princess Ann, and Norfolk, including the cities of Norfolk and Portsmouth[)], and which excepted parts, are for the present, left precisely as if this proclamation were not issued.
And by virtue of the power, and for the purpose aforesaid, I do order and declare that all persons held as slaves within said designated States, and parts of States, are, and henceforward shall be free"

From the text of Lincoln’s executive order it is clear that Lincoln freed the slaves in areas that he had no control over, but kept in bondage the slaves in areas that he did have control over. And read the Lincoln Douglas debates. Lincoln said that he had no desire to make people of color the equal to the white person.

Lee was torn by his commentment to the United States Army and to States Rights. Lee, being a citizen of Virginia, chose Virginia.

To say that slavery was not a part of the war of 1864 - 1865 would be wrong. But slavery was not THE cause, just a spoke in the wheel. States Rights was another spoke. Money was the hub. The agrarian southern states before 1861 was the richest part of the country. The industrialized northern states wanted tariffs, which would benefit the area, but would penalize the south. The south has never enjoyed such prosperity since.
 

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This ^^^^^is a prime example of history being written by the victors.

General Lee inherited his slaves, then freed them by his own free will. By contrast, General Grant kept his slaves until he was forced to free them by the 14th amendment. Ever wonder where the phrase "Because good help is hard to find" came from?

Abraham Lincoln did not free the slaves with the Emancipation Proclomation. Read his words.

"Arkansas, Texas, Louisiana, (except the Parishes of St. Bernard, Plaquemines, Jefferson, St. John, St. Charles, St. James Ascension, Assumption, Terrebonne, Lafourche, St. Mary, St. Martin, and Orleans, including the City of New Orleans) Mississippi, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia, (except the forty-eight counties designated as West Virginia, and also the counties of Berkley, Accomac, Northampton, Elizabeth City, York, Princess Ann, and Norfolk, including the cities of Norfolk and Portsmouth[)], and which excepted parts, are for the present, left precisely as if this proclamation were not issued.
And by virtue of the power, and for the purpose aforesaid, I do order and declare that all persons held as slaves within said designated States, and parts of States, are, and henceforward shall be free"

From the text of Lincoln’s executive order it is clear that LiNicole freed the slaves in areas that he had no control over, but kept in bondage the slaves in areas that he did have control over. And read the Lincoln Douglas debates. Lincoln said that he had no desire to make people of color the equal to the white person.

Lee was torn buy his commentment to the United States Army and to States Rights. Lee, being a citizen of Virginia, chose Virginia.

To say that slavery was not a part of the war of 1864 - 1865 would be wrong. But slavery was not THE cause, but was just a spoke in the wheel. States Rights was another spoke. Money was the hub. The agrarian southern states before 1861 was the richest part of the country. The industrialized northern states wanted tariffs, which would benefit the area, but would penalize the south.
Thank you Professor Ritchey. I have argued these same points more times than I can remember. Which is why the current states rights arguments about the 2A get my attention.
 
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Thank you Professor Ritchey. I have argued these same points more times than I can remember. Which is why the current states rights arguments about the 2A get my attention.
(y)
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Slavery was not the initial cause of the Civil War but it became a big issue of the war. The Emancipation Proclamation helped pave the way for the 13th Amendment to be ratified on the 6th of December 1865 which abolished slavery.
 

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Slavery was not the initial cause of the Civil War but it became a big issue of the war. The Emancipation Proclamation helped pave the way for the 13th Amendment to be ratified on the 6th of December 1865 which abolished slavery.
What the emancipation proclomation did was keep England from entering the fray on the southern side. It was a political move. If Lincoln wanted to free the slaves a good start would of been to free the slaves in areas he had control over, don’t you think?
 
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What the emancipation proclomation did was keep England from entering the fray on the southern side. It was a political move. If Lincoln wanted to free the slaves a good start would of been to free the slaves in areas he had control over, don’t you think?
And that move would have cost him the border states, especially Maryland. So, yeah, political move to keep the English textile industry from forcing England into an economic war.
 
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