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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone with firsthand experience in using one of these? I've got a 50 caliber muzzle loader barrel with a bit of surface rust on it.
IMG_1356.jpg
 

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King of you Monkeys
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Used it on several occasions. And keep it on hand. Prep work and cleaning make the world of difference. If it's just spots touch up is easy whole rifle needs a lot of work. Use a hair dryer to heat up spots to apply the blue, card and repeat till you get the color you want
 

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It works well enough. Leaves a thin bluing that will fade with cleaning when new. Apply to a clean surface with heat like @moona11 says. Apply several coats, wipe with oil and let set. Time is your friend.
 

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Used it on several occasions. And keep it on hand. Prep work and cleaning make the world of difference. If it's just spots touch up is easy whole rifle needs a lot of work. Use a hair dryer to heat up spots to apply the blue, card and repeat till you get the color you want
I use a heat gun...
 
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King of you Monkeys
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I use a heat gun...
I use a torch on a full gun. Lots of people don't have heating or a torch. But most have a hairdryer.
 

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I use a torch on a full gun. Lots of people don't have heating or a torch. But most have a hairdryer.
Guess I've been lucky. Everything I've done has fit in the oven.
 

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Guess I've been lucky. Everything I've done has fit in the oven.
That doesn't screw up the temper of..... Never mind. Old guy moment
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Used it on several occasions. And keep it on hand. Prep work and cleaning make the world of difference. If it's just spots touch up is easy whole rifle needs a lot of work. Use a hair dryer to heat up spots to apply the blue, card and repeat till you get the color you want
I might have to draw file and sand to bare metal. Thinking about a light plum bluing.
 

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Anyone with firsthand experience in using one of these? I've got a 50 caliber muzzle loader barrel with a bit of surface rust on it.
View attachment 68357
I bought a surface rusted Marlin Model 25 bolt action rifle from a pawn shop in Maryland during the middle 1990's for $40.
I used the Birchwood-Casey rebluing kit. Just followed the enclosed instruction.
The rifle came out so beautifully that I redid the stock.

It's was the most accurate rifle I ever owned.

eldar
 

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King of you Monkeys
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I might have to draw file and sand to bare metal. Thinking about a light plum bluing.
I have 2 or 3 different kinds from Brownell. They turn out pretty good
 

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W
You're not supposed to tell her.
Wet tumbled brass one time and used the oven to dry them. Was not allowed after that. I have a small toaster oven I use in the shop now. Makes drying paint so easy
 

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You should go the youtube channel Mark Novak The Anvil. He advocates boiling rust off to oxidize it. That will leave what is left of the original bluing which is much better than removing the exiting blue and rust and then applying cold blue. Cold blue will not have a long life.
I have boiled, carded off the oxide, and then cold blued the entire gun to fill the bare spots where the rust used to be. You will still have the remaining factory finish. This has worked well for me.

I have a long piece of PVC pipe that is capped on one end. I pour boiling water in the pipe and drop in a rusted barrel to oxidize it.
 

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I might have to draw file and sand to bare metal. Thinking about a light plum bluing.
Don't do that.

You're planning on taking it down to parts anyway. Do that. De-grease it. Then submerge it in boiling water. This will convert the red oxide to black oxide; i.e. "gun blue." Lightly card the converted area with 0000 steel wool. Make sure it's dry. Oil it. Put it back together.

This is actually what field armorers used to back from WW1 through Vietnam, particularly with 1911 pistols. They were parkerized but would sometimes rust underneath the park because parkerizing really doesn't protect the gun from rust it is just kinda an open-cell hard foam-like sorta-sponge surface to hold oil. So the field armorers would boil the part and convert the red rust underneath the parking into black oxide ("gun blue").

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
 

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I've used Big 45 Frontier Metal Cleaner with success on one of my Colt 2nd Generation percussion revolvers that had a couple of small rust spots on it. It got rid of the rust spots but didn't hurt the bluing as advertised.

https://www.big45metalcleaner.com/
Just ordered some, $6.00 including shipping, I bought 2.

I have some older AKs with "spots" I just keep oiled, but hopefully this does the trick.

Thank you!!
 

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I bought a surface rusted Marlin Model 25 bolt action rifle from a pawn shop in Maryland during the middle 1990's for $40.
I used the Birchwood-Casey rebluing kit. Just followed the enclosed instruction.
The rifle came out so beautifully that I redid the stock.

It's was the most accurate rifle I ever owned.

eldar
They are incredibly accurate rifles...
I have the same rifle...1972 vintage that was passed on to me from my grandfather.
I kept that one in lieu of a Winchester model 1895, .35 caliber ..
Since my Glenfield Marlin needs some mild cosmetic, I just may well get one of these bluing kits and give 'er a go.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Don't do that.

You're planning on taking it down to parts anyway. Do that. De-grease it. Then submerge it in boiling water. This will convert the red oxide to black oxide; i.e. "gun blue." Lightly card the converted area with 0000 steel wool. Make sure it's dry. Oil it. Put it back together.

This is actually what field armorers used to back from WW1 through Vietnam, particularly with 1911 pistols. They were parkerized but would sometimes rust underneath the park because parkerizing really doesn't protect the gun from rust it is just kinda an open-cell hard foam-like sorta-sponge surface to hold oil. So the field armorers would boil the part and convert the red rust underneath the parking into black oxide ("gun blue").

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
It's the barrel that needs it.
 
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