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The Kind you acttually take the time to put together. A BOB is no good if it only resides in your mind.

I am way beyond lazy and not goint to dig my bag out but for starts before the rest jump in. Mine is just a Bag with some simple camoing gear and then ADDED stuff For SHTF. And things I think can help.

Mine is only for a few Days but CAN be stretched to long term as long as water and food are available.
 

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I have several that work together. The largest is a large, heavy-duty, O.D. green nylon tool bag from Sears that has a multitude of internal and external pockets and flaps. The smaller ones were made by Shakespeare as fishing gear totes and are heavy-duty black nylon with rippered pockets. All three have hand and shoulder straps and are capable of heavy loads (such as ammo). They work well together as one package, or as individual ones according to what I need at the time. I pack them according to importance of contents in case I have to shed one or two.

Use your imagination to think outside the box when it comes to a BOB, as everyone may have a little different take on what they need vs what is conventionally available. Aluminum framed backpacks can come in very handy should you find yourself walking out of Dodge. Some items in the luggage department at Walmart may be suitable to your needs. There is no need to spend a ton of money to get what works well for you. Flea markets, Goodwill, and garage sales can produce excellent options at a fraction of the cost of new.

I don't know about everybody else, but my wife & I find the act of preparing for the possiblity of the SHTF more entertaining and enlightening than any other hobby.

P.S. I bought a half dozen more steel military ammo boxes at the gun show last weekend for $5 each. They are great to stash your ammo reserves in, and the rubber seals will keep your powder and other valuables dry. I keep mine securely stacked in the garage in case of a hasty exit in the BO-Van.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Depends, I have one for house one for truck. I try to go low key blend in a little. If you are walking around with an Alice pack and two ammo cans you might catch some unwanted atten. Build your own, items will vary due to location. Use your kit I have bought one or two items that looked really cool but failed; like Gerber hallow hatchet it broke on first swing.
 

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A good plan is to configure a BOB that suits your lifestyle and environment. This is the part where many fail.

Alot of folks think BOB and think "Uber Survivalist" and get all the trimmings that would make a mountain man proud. And, that's great.... Until you realize that you live in the Bronx, or in the Florida Keys or in Bakersfield.

Survival is using the environment to the best of your abilities to survive. And, your tools and equipment should reflect that, as should the method of transport. A huge alloy-framed backpack is great, but as it was pointed out, would look very strange in downtown Chicago and might not be comfortable for your build.

That being said the best way to approach would be to describe my kit: I live in Phoenix, AZ. A VERY large city that suffers from urban sprawl, extremely high tempratures during the summer (120+degrees) and has more mechanical elements than wilderness element to deal with. My BOB is based off of an older Oakley large sport backpack made for motocross use. I used this bag because it's main purpose was as a tool bag. In it I carry a Compact high quality alloy socket set, mini-multimeter, screwdriver compliment, compact bolt cutters, Gerber "suspension" multi tool, LED flashlight w/batteries, universal folding solar charger (about $30 online) with adaptors, FRS 24-channel radios (x2) with rechargable AA batteries, Simple medkit, 5 MRE packs, water purification tabs, Wi-Fi "sniffer" keychain, several bic lighters in a ziplock bag, one ratcheting tow strap, copy of my ID, fixed-blade Gerber 5" knife and it has attachments for two water bottles on the side. Being Arizona, I always have several gallons of fresh bottled water or more in the house all the time (because the tap water is crap here), and I keep at least a litre in the Vespa at all times just for common sense sake.

It's a compliment of equipment that is configured to what I would normally encounter considering that any travel I will be doing is not across barren wilderness, but industrialized urban construction. I won't be contending with rivers, canyons or snow, but with locked doors, gates, fuel pumps and other such mechanical devices. Water is key around here, so that's the biggest challenge. Also, my BOB easily attaches to the utility racks of most ATV's, motorcycles and the like (since it is a Motocross bag, it was designed with attachment loops and straps. Very smart build) and looks more "extreme sport" and less "survivalist". I did not see the need for hatchets, fishing gear, winter gear or the like because that just doesn't apply. I purposely excluded flares because in an urban environment open flames are a bad idea simply because you don't know what event may bring it about. A leaking gas line can occur from a rupture, a flood or even neglect, and Phoenix uses ALOT of natural gas. Also, tools help get you moving if you decide to attempt mechanical transport or come across mechanical transport. (But, to be said, it should only be attempted if you are VERY well versed at it and have the resources. Walking may be slower, but it's safer than making a novice attempt at a motorbike or off road auto, making an error and injuring yourself or others.)

It sounds like alot, but when you think about it, it fits well into the bag. I'll post pics when I get home from work (which may not be till Sunday, so hold tight).
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Wally World has a combo back pack/fanny pack also comes w/2 water bottles. You can put 3 days supply in fanny pack and load top with other essentials.
 

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Thanks Neo, now I am singing the Rolling Stones' "Faraway Eyes"--love that song.

Just a question really about AZ water: is it unhealthy or does it just not taste so great? Water is one our best resources in AR. (Coke bottles central AR tapwater and sells it, Dasanti, I think it is, one of those brands anyway).

anyway, my BOB is pretty nondescript, to the point where you could never guess what all I had in it. FAK, water tabs, ammo, pistol, flashlight and niMh batteries and charger, crank radio with outlets for charging, knives, compass, saw, fire stee/mag block, screwdrivers, socks, jacket, lighter, canteen, lock pick set, zip ties, 550 cord and ziplock bags
 

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Thanks Neo, now I am singing the Rolling Stones' "Faraway Eyes"--love that song.

Just a question really about AZ water: is it unhealthy or does it just not taste so great? Water is one our best resources in AR. (Coke bottles central AR tapwater and sells it, Dasanti, I think it is, one of those brands anyway).

anyway, my BOB is pretty nondescript, to the point where you could never guess what all I had in it. FAK, water tabs, ammo, pistol, flashlight and niMh batteries and charger, crank radio with outlets for charging, knives, compass, saw, fire stee/mag block, screwdrivers, socks, jacket, lighter, canteen, lock pick set, zip ties, 550 cord and ziplock bags
Arizona water used to be questionable, but these days it is pretty good.... it just tastes like crap! There's alot of minerals that make the water more "hard", and therefore not very palatable. I find it difficult to drink because of that quality, and that's a bad thing if you're talking about keeping hydrated: You have to WANT to drink and drink often. Anything that prohibits that action could be dangerous.
 

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Just noticed a great ammo bag/BOB bag on outdoorbunker.com for $22.95. It's called the Deluxe Shooter's Case and looks to be well built and rugged, just the type of bag needed to carry ammo and small arms equipment.

Their shipping seems to be very reasonable as well.
 

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"do u have a bug out location or not"

This can be quite a tough question for some to answer, such as myself. Our first choice is to stay put, where we have all our resources and supplies. The further we go, the less supplies we'd have, and the more at risk we'd be.

We've always known that we live 40 miles downwind of a prevailing wsw wind flow from two nearby nuclear power plants that may require us to BO at a moment's notice. Then the other day I was on a website that showed we are actually within 200 miles of 8 nuclear power plants all in the northern Illinois area near Chicago. Any major release of one or more of these plants could cover quite a bit of southern Michigan and force us to make some long distance plans.

If only we could click our heels three times and be in a safe place...
 

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"do u have a bug out location or not"

This can be quite a tough question for some to answer, such as myself. Our first choice is to stay put, where we have all our resources and supplies. The further we go, the less supplies we'd have, and the more at risk we'd be.

We've always known that we live 40 miles downwind of a prevailing wsw wind flow from two nearby nuclear power plants that may require us to BO at a moment's notice. Then the other day I was on a website that showed we are actually within 200 miles of 8 nuclear power plants all in the northern Illinois area near Chicago. Any major release of one or more of these plants could cover quite a bit of southern Michigan and force us to make some long distance plans.

If only we could click our heels three times and be in a safe place...
If chicago had to evacuate, would it be faster on foot or in a car? How quickly could you and yours get out of town on foot with supplies for 5 days?
 

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I don't live in Chicago, but from having driven through there numerous times, I would imagine it to be a nightmare to try & leave by any means other than helicopter.

If we were both home, we could be on the road from here in 15 minutes or less, but there are numerous variables involved with planning for any scenario - especially with how much advanced warning we'd have.
 

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My wife started it. The idea of a BOB or SHTF bag. I ended up gettting two awesome backpacks with internal frame. Lots of compartments. I just soaked the hell out of them with Scotch guard so they should be extra waterproof now.
 

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I dont have a BOB I have a GHB :D I plan on bugging in if SHTF. But in an effort to seem less crazy and to get away from all the MF'ing abbreviations I call it a survival kit. Commercial readily available, and very expensive, 72hr survival kits are becoming pretty common place since Katrina. Putting your own together at the dollar store and walmart are much better Ideas.
Basic crap you need
1 food 3600 calories worth per person.
2 water 60 oz per person
3 First-aid Kit
4 Tools, Fixed blade knife and multitool
5 98.6 maintainence, keep warm, keep cool, keep dry gear. This can range from tents to panchos , space blankets ect.
6 a bag
everything else is icing IMHO
 

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Kudos Neothespian,


I am gonna add a set of bolt or chain cuttters to my bag. I live in the country, but that seems like a great idea.
 

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For the urban survivalist.

Instead of a mini bolt cutter... Dyno Kwick Pick

Here's a link to a cheesy video that shows how it works... http://www.fisherindustriesinc.com/fisherindustriesinc/sell.aspx
(yes there's a cut in the video, but with practice, padlocks are that quick... door locks a bit slower) ~$20.00 available all over.
 

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