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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Any of you ever use J B Bore Polish? I got some from Brownell's to polish my Mark II Savage, but I've never used the stuff. Might try it on a couple of the newer rifles and see if it smooths the bore much. Yeah, moonz, I know - now is a poor time to ask if its any good. I never claimed to be smart
 

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I‘d think that if metal bullets sliding down the barrel at 1000 fps aren’t polishing it, not much else will do it.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I‘d think that if metal bullets sliding down the barrel at 1000 fps aren’t polishing it, not much else will do it.
.22 LR are mostly lead, though - softer than steel by a jug full. I'd think they would be too soft to polish a barrel
 
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.22 LR are mostly lead, though - softer than steel by a jug full. I'd think they would be too soft to polish a barrel
True.
So here’s the question.

Do you want a shiny bore? We’ll assume yes.

Ok, so......why? To make the gun more accurate?

Would a SMOOTH bore that isn’t necessarily shiny be better at doing that?

Especially since, in the .22 world, people shoot bullets specifically to “foul” or “unpolish” the bore before shooting for record?

Polishing removes material. Minute amounts, but....some.
Do you REALLY want to remove parts of that carefully crafted dimensionally critical barrel using a brush and some paste on the end of a rod?
 
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.22 LR are mostly lead, though - softer than steel by a jug full. I'd think they would be too soft to polish a barrel
Caveat:

During the polishing process, progressively softer and finer grit materials are used to create a higher quality finish....
 

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True.
So here’s the question.

Do you want a shiny bore? We’ll assume yes.

Ok, so......why? To make the gun more accurate?

Would a SMOOTH bore that isn’t necessarily shiny be better at doing that?

Especially since, in the .22 world, people shoot bullets specifically to “foul” or “unpolish” the bore before shooting for record?

Polishing removes material. Minute amounts, but....some.
Do you REALLY want to remove parts of that carefully crafted dimensionally critical barrel using a brush and some paste on the end of a rod?
I would think a polished chamber would be more beneficial than polishing the bore for reasons.
 

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As the Marines discovered in Vietnam in the first few months of issue of the M16.
It’s sad that men died because some bean counter saved a few bucks.
 
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I would think a polished chamber would be more beneficial than polishing the bore for reasons.
Not to mention that polishing the bore just wears it sooner than it might otherwise be worn through normal use. If done wrong, there's also a risk of creating variations in the contours of the muzzle, and all of the performance enhancements sought from the polishing process will be lost--or made worse.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Well, gents, I appreciate all the comments. If I'm getting this right, clean the bore, but forget the polishing compound. Polish and clean the chamber. Right? Experiment with ammo until I find the most accurate rounds for MY gun (not easy right now, but worth the effort) @Rachgier - good way to polish a .22 lr chamber without removing the barrel? @ajole - thanks for pointing out that smooth doesn't equal shiny. I want smooth, shiny isn't important. I'm old, I get confused about....you know.....the thing.
 
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Well, gents, I appreciate all the comments. If I'm getting this right, clean the bore, but forget the polishing compound. Polish and clean the chamber. Right? Experiment with ammo until I find the most accurate rounds for MY gun (not easy right now, but worth the effort) @Rachgier - good way to polish a .22 lr chamber without removing the barrel? @ajole - thanks for pointing out that smooth doesn't equal shiny. I want smooth, shiny isn't important. I'm old, I get confused about....you know.....the thing.
If you are talking about your new SW Victory 22, it will be fine as is. Both of mine certainly are. Ask ajole about his SW Victory perhaps. However, I break them in with copper plated rounds. But, if you decide to shoot a bunch of only plain lead bullets, you will get some lead build up. No doubt about it in a .22. But, that requires a bit more barrel cleaning when the time may come you lose your accuracy. For these pistols I mostly only shoot copper plated rounds most of the time.
NOW, if competion was the case, only then would I go to the all lead bullets, if you believe their accuracy claims. So far, I see little to no difference unless I shoot some low velocity rounds of either type bullet. They don't work as well for me at all.
 

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Well, gents, I appreciate all the comments. If I'm getting this right, clean the bore, but forget the polishing compound. Polish and clean the chamber. Right? Experiment with ammo until I find the most accurate rounds for MY gun (not easy right now, but worth the effort) @Rachgier - good way to polish a .22 lr chamber without removing the barrel? @ajole - thanks for pointing out that smooth doesn't equal shiny. I want smooth, shiny isn't important. I'm old, I get confused about....you know.....the thing.
Bolt action or AR type? Pull the bolt.

Semi-auto, non removable bolt? Crown protector, extra rod sections, mark the tip end for depth.


Electric drill, cleaning rod, bore brush (I prefer nylon) marked for chamber depth at the base end so the tip does the work, cleaning patch wrapped around the brush, a line of polish on the contraption, then let'er eat. 30 -60s, then change patches until they come out clean. Inspect with bore light. Repeat until desired result is achieved.
 

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Not to mention that polishing the bore just wears it sooner than it might otherwise be worn through normal use. If done wrong, there's also a risk of creating variations in the contours of the muzzle, and all of the performance enhancements sought from the polishing process will be lost--or made worse.
Covered in Ajole's post, which is why I didn't mention it myself.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Bolt action @Rachgier, so it is what I thought. Thanks. @OldOutlaw - in this case its a rifle. Still working with the Victory - hoping for competition in the fall. All this smallbore competition is new to me, though the same air rifle basics apply. Don't see me buying a high end precision rifle any time soon, though
 

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Bolt action @Rachgier, so it is what I thought. Thanks. @OldOutlaw - in this case its a rifle. Still working with the Victory - hoping for competition in the fall. All this smallbore competition is new to me, though the same air rifle basics apply. Don't see me buying a high end precision rifle any time soon, though
I agree with Rach regarding the chamber polish using a drill and nylon brush.

That said, if I had a match chamber or a Bentz chamber, I wouldn’t mess with it, the tolerances are intentionally tight, and I don’t want to loosen that up at all. I see no advantage to polishing a .22LR chamber, unless it’s having trouble chambering rounds even when cleaned properly. Assuming springs and etc are all in proper working order.

When you get to the rifle point, you don’t HAVE to go high end to get solid precision. Spending the money makes it more of a sure thing, but a lot of the $300-$500 rifles will shoot pretty well. And if you buy 50 or 60 cheap rifles, you can get two or three $120 rifles that do it too.:ROFLMAO:
 
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