"Brass Jacketed"?

Discussion in 'Caliber Zone' started by gman68W, Oct 11, 2014.

  1. gman68W

    gman68W Lemme Show Ya Something! Member

    I'm sure this stuff has been around for a while, but it's the first I've heard of it. I'm not exactly up-to-date on my metallurgy, so would someone explain the differences between brass-jacketed bullets and copper-jacketed? I'd imagine it has something to do with a more rapid expansion due to softer metals, and would be more useful in slower, heavier bullets like 40S&W.
     
  2. bluharley

    bluharley Member

    I'd take a copper bullet over brass any day! Actually, I have no idea, they'll both hurt.
     

  3. ajole

    ajole Supporting Member

    34,512
    10,738
    NE Utah
    Brass is harder than copper.

    Not sure which one you meant as softer.

    But brass bullets are standard dangerous game bullets, low expansion, deep penetration.
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2014
  4. superbeast1098

    superbeast1098 Member

    173
    1
    I know that the Remington Golden Saber is brass jacketed... It expands pretty well...
     
  5. ajole

    ajole Supporting Member

    34,512
    10,738
    NE Utah
    Yeah...they also penetrate well.;)

    From Remington

    "Jacket made entirely of cartridge brass, which releases energy over longer distance while mushrooming"

    Meaning, it's harder, doesn't open too fast, penetrates deep.


    "Spiral nose-cut feature permits mushrooming at lower velocity without sacrificing penetration or terminal performance"

    Had to do that as the harder brass wouldn't mushroom at all without it.
     
  6. sdbrit68

    sdbrit68 Supporting Member

    BY low expansion, do you mean how much it opens up when it hits ?
     
  7. TNTRAILERTRASH

    TNTRAILERTRASH Supporting Member

    Only brass jacket I have bought is Perfecta, BrassMaxx, and UMC. All ball ammo.
     
  8. ajole

    ajole Supporting Member

    34,512
    10,738
    NE Utah
    Yes. Dangerous game solids penetrate deeply, they depend on that instead of expansion, because they are shooting big tough animals, and a soft or hollow point will open too soon, or separate, and not get into the vitals.

    Here is one pic.

    [​IMG]

    Brass jacketed is simply a normal jacketed bullet, using brass instead of copper. Brass is made by using copper and zinc, making it cheaper than straight copper, I think. But it's also harder, which helps some bullets perform differently.

    So a brass jacketed bullet can expand, slower or faster than a copper jacket, depending on design.
    These are the Golden Sabers

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2014
  9. ArmyScout

    ArmyScout Supporting Member

    3,960
    279
    IL
    Brass is an alloy, Copper is an element and softer than Brass. Copper jacketed bullets have a greater expansion rate, oxidizes easily, are toxic, and may leave residue in the barrel. It is generally used for big game, but is available in smaller calibers for self defense. There probably isn't much advantage of Copper jackets over Brass in hand guns until you get into the .45acp ammo.
     
  10. lklawson

    lklawson Staff Member

    You mean the lead core is toxic, not the copper, right?

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk
     
  11. ArmyScout

    ArmyScout Supporting Member

    3,960
    279
    IL
    Copper is toxic. It's official name is copperiedus which is an excess of copper in the body. Chance of getting it from handling copper bullets would be extremely minimal. The main danger to shooting copper jacketed ammo is exposure to any copper residue left in the barrel when cleaning the firearm. But again the possibility is minimal and would take years of exposure. If you reload with copper, good idea to wash your hands when done.
     
  12. lklawson

    lklawson Staff Member

    We still use copper water pipes. The Navy is particularly keen on it.

    Basically, any metal is "toxic" in sufficient quantity, including iron, which is frequently taken and prescribed as a dietary supplement.

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk
     
  13. ArmyScout

    ArmyScout Supporting Member

    3,960
    279
    IL
    That is correct. Any metal can be toxic to the human body. Lead is one of the worse. Some metals are actually essential for human health, in trace amounts of course. Including: iron, zinc, copper, manganese, chromium, molybdenum and selenium. These metals are found in sufficient quantity in soils, and are supplied through plant and animal food sources for humans.
     
  14. Hermitt

    Hermitt Hey! Get Off My Lawn! Member

    It makes you wonder why there are so many copper bracelets and other health/pain relief products that have copper in them....

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  15. gman68W

    gman68W Lemme Show Ya Something! Member

    So, not really worth mentioning in this context as "toxic". In fact, I think you may be confusing "toxicity" with "chemical imbalance". Just touching things isn't going to poison you, unless it's something weird like mercury. For example, copper is an essential trace element, necessary for the development of healthy livers in human fetuses. The fact that a 'toxic' metal is vital for the growth of an organ that does naught but filter out toxic stuff ought to tell you something.

    But that's neither here nor there. My question was about the key differences between the metals used for bullet jacketing.
     
  16. lklawson

    lklawson Staff Member

    I read somewhere that they used to zinc plate bullets and that there was one brand of ammunition that used a zinc gas check (wafer or platter between the bullet and the powder). From what little I understand, the idea was that, like copper and brass, zinc is harder than lead but that, unlike copper, brass, and lead, the zinc adds lubricity and "coats" the barrel and prevents lead fouling.

    I'll have to see if I can dig up a link or something.

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk
     
  17. lklawson

    lklawson Staff Member

    Here's the gas check stuff.

    Harvey's Prot-X-Bore zinc gas checks.

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk
     
  18. TNTRAILERTRASH

    TNTRAILERTRASH Supporting Member

    The smoke from welding zinc can give you a permanent head ache.

    You guy left out magnesium.
     
  19. lklawson

    lklawson Staff Member

    Guys who work in zinc galvanization plants are reported to come down with flu-like symptoms every monday when they go back to work.

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk
     
  20. Bull

    Bull Just a Man Supporting Member


    I seem to get the Asian variety of that.... Dragon ass...