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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Me and some buddies broke it in a bit (while also shooting his tanfoglio EA witness .45 and a .22 mag rifle) with 180 rounds through it jammed about 12 times, which is certainly less than ideal, but considering I didn't leave the mags to break in for a week (I got it friday, shot it sunday) I'm sure the next trek will be better. Way fun to shoot though, both my buddies enjoyed shooting it the best. The jams I got were either a double feed (2 rounds trying to share the chamber, or nose of the bullet pointing upwards in the chamber.... is it fair to say this is a magazine issue and not a feed ramp issue?
 

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Buffing the feed ramp will help loads, as will "seating" the magazine for a while (a week or two) fully loaded with rounds to take the stiffness out of that spring. Also, stiffen your grip a *bit* tighter: Being a blowback-actuated pistol, it requires a firm hand to take advantage of the kinetic energy used to cycle the round.

But (and I can't see how I missed a handle like YOURS! See...there are more than just me who shoot from the other side of the aisle!!!) :welcome:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Buffing the feed ramp will help loads, as will "seating" the magazine for a while (a week or two) fully loaded with rounds to take the stiffness out of that spring. Also, stiffen your grip a *bit* tighter: Being a blowback-actuated pistol, it requires a firm hand to take advantage of the kinetic energy used to cycle the round.

But (and I can't see how I missed a handle like YOURS! See...there are more than just me who shoot from the other side of the aisle!!!) :welcome:
esh, I'm frighted to handle buffing my own feed ramp (heh), I'll leave my mags seated and will take a picture of my mag lips and post to see if they need to be bent in or out? Thanks again guys.

(you can never have too many voices of reason :) )
 

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It's actually quite easy. Just set your dremel at a lower speed setting (I used 5k RPM) with a light alloy buffing compound and a dense cotton buffing wheel. Move it in a figure eight motion without letting it sit on the metal static for any period of time, and when it looks shiny, you're done! Hardly a minute of work and the results are flawless!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It's actually quite easy. Just set your dremel at a lower speed setting (I used 5k RPM) with a light alloy buffing compound and a dense cotton buffing wheel. Move it in a figure eight motion without letting it sit on the metal static for any period of time, and when it looks shiny, you're done! Hardly a minute of work and the results are flawless!
Won't I need to take the gun apart? I doubt id be able to do that through the ejection port.
 

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Yep. But, it's not as scary as it seems. The whole assembly is held together with a pin at the lower back of the slide, accessible when the slide is locked back via a notch in the alloy slide. There used to be a breakdown on how to disassemble the weapon on here somewhere...lemme see if I can dig it up. Either that or try our super-duper search function.

Oh, just remember that when you remove the slide, cover it with a medium sized carton or box, since springs tend to fly off if you're not careful!!! The box makes them easy to find instead of hunting around in the carpet for a half our looking for the bugger.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yep. But, it's not as scary as it seems. The whole assembly is held together with a pin at the lower back of the slide, accessible when the slide is locked back via a notch in the alloy slide. There used to be a breakdown on how to disassemble the weapon on here somewhere...lemme see if I can dig it up. Either that or try our super-duper search function.

Oh, just remember that when you remove the slide, cover it with a medium sized carton or box, since springs tend to fly off if you're not careful!!! The box makes them easy to find instead of hunting around in the carpet for a half our looking for the bugger.
Yes yes I read the guides. I'm still scared. I guess I'm worried about the putting it back together part more than the taking it apart part. heh.
 

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Yep. But, it's not as scary as it seems. The whole assembly is held together with a pin at the lower back of the slide, accessible when the slide is locked back via a notch in the alloy slide. There used to be a breakdown on how to disassemble the weapon on here somewhere...lemme see if I can dig it up. Either that or try our super-duper search function.

Oh, just remember that when you remove the slide, cover it with a medium sized carton or box, since springs tend to fly off if you're not careful!!! The box makes them easy to find instead of hunting around in the carpet for a half our looking for the bugger.
Yes yes I read the guides. I'm still scared. I guess I'm worried about the putting it back together part more than the taking it apart part. heh.
+1 taking the thing apart is the easy part! It's once you have all your parts spread out in front of you that it's hard to figure out where everything goes again. :p although a firearm might be a little simpler than my bike was to put back together once it's apart, heh..
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
well, second time to the range, jamming about as much as before...suppose ill have to track down a pin punch (1/8th?) and a dremel with a polishing wheel. Though would the feed ramp be causing the double feeds and the stovepipes? I've been having so many different jams they are hard to categorize (and yes, I'm quite sure im not limp wristing)
 

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Hi, my name is Broomhead and I am a Hi-Point addict.
Everyone said:
Hello Broomhead.
Welcome to our support group.
There are five steps in our program.
Step 1: Buy ammo and send it down range.
Step 2: Buy more Hi-Points.
Step 3: Laugh at all the Gun Snobs for paying way too much, then out shoot them at the range.
Step 4: Happily spread your addiction to others whenever possible.
Step 5:Repeat steps 1 through 4 endlessly.
Unfortunately, these are not steps to recovery.
There is no recovery.
:devilsidesmile::devilsidesmile::devilsidesmile:

-->Go Here and read. My compilation of common malfunctions, their causes, and fixes.<--
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Hi, my name is Broomhead and I am a Hi-Point addict.
Everyone said:
Hello Broomhead.
Welcome to our support group.
There are five steps in our program.
Step 1: Buy ammo and send it down range.
Step 2: Buy more Hi-Points.
Step 3: Laugh at all the Gun Snobs for paying way too much, then out shoot them at the range.
Step 4: Happily spread your addiction to others whenever possible.
Step 5:Repeat steps 1 through 4 endlessly.
Unfortunately, these are not steps to recovery.
There is no recovery.
:devilsidesmile::devilsidesmile::devilsidesmile:

-->Go Here and read. My compilation of common malfunctions, their causes, and fixes.<--
yes, ive read that everytime you've posted it on one of my posts, no offense, but if I keep asking questions past that, or you obviously dont read what I wrote then it comes off as pretty rude.
 

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yes, ive read that everytime you've posted it on one of my posts, no offense, but if I keep asking questions past that, or you obviously dont read what I wrote then it comes off as pretty rude.
A. You don't have enough rounds through your gun to say without a doubt that it isn't the feed ramp, as stated in my guide.
B. The feed ramp can cause nose-up jams, as stated in my guide.
C. Stove-pipes are almost always caused by limp-wristing, the magazine will not cause this. As stated in my guide.
D. The nose-up jams can be caused by the mag, but more likely are caused by the feed ramp. See letter A. Also stated in my guide.
E. In my guide I also stated that it is not a good idea to modify anything until you are positive you have enough rounds to consider it broken in, approximately 200-500rds, or more.
Broomhead said:
You may find that an unwarranted adjustment may cause issues after the break-in period is completed. The adjusted part also may not have been the cause of the problem, but was in fact caused by limp wristing. It is much more difficult to undo any adjustment than it is to be patient with your HiPoint, and yourself, and correctly diagnose the problem.
These were not just idle words. This happened to my Dad. He was sure that his problems were caused by the mag feed lips. However, when he reached 700-800rds his problems began to occur again. He undid the modification and the failures went away.

I have tremendous trouble believing that the mag feed lips are everyone's problems. I have a 10rd mag that I carry as a spare. This last trip to the range I discovered that the feed lips had become so crimped that I had difficulty loading even a single round. However, to my surprise, all 10rds fired, multiple times. They fed correctly with rapid fire, slow fire, intentional limp-wristing. This mag performed flawlessly before and after being crimped. I have never adjusted a single feed lip or even buffed the feed ramp.

So, not to be rude, but you obviously hadn't read everything that I wrote.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
yes, ive read that everytime you've posted it on one of my posts, no offense, but if I keep asking questions past that, or you obviously dont read what I wrote then it comes off as pretty rude.
A. You don't have enough rounds through your gun to say without a doubt that it isn't the feed ramp, as stated in my guide.
B. The feed ramp can cause nose-up jams, as stated in my guide.
C. Stove-pipes are almost always caused by limp-wristing, the magazine will not cause this. As stated in my guide.
D. The nose-up jams can be caused by the mag, but more likely are caused by the feed ramp. See letter A. Also stated in my guide.
E. In my guide I also stated that it is not a good idea to modify anything until you are positive you have enough rounds to consider it broken in, approximately 200-500rds, or more.
Broomhead said:
You may find that an unwarranted adjustment may cause issues after the break-in period is completed. The adjusted part also may not have been the cause of the problem, but was in fact caused by limp wristing. It is much more difficult to undo any adjustment than it is to be patient with your HiPoint, and yourself, and correctly diagnose the problem.
These were not just idle words. This happened to my Dad. He was sure that his problems were caused by the mag feed lips. However, when he reached 700-800rds his problems began to occur again. He undid the modification and the failures went away.

I have tremendous trouble believing that the mag feed lips are everyone's problems. I have a 10rd mag that I carry as a spare. This last trip to the range I discovered that the feed lips had become so crimped that I had difficulty loading even a single round. However, to my surprise, all 10rds fired, multiple times. They fed correctly with rapid fire, slow fire, intentional limp-wristing. This mag performed flawlessly before and after being crimped. I have never adjusted a single feed lip or even buffed the feed ramp.

So, not to be rude, but you obviously hadn't read everything that I wrote.
Obviously Broom, you haven't read everything I've written, since I've fired 450 rounds through the gun. So it is broken in. I never said it wasn't the feed ramp, in fact I polished it today. Like I said, I read your guide. I never said the mag lips were all my problem, in fact, the mag lips were most other's suggestion to my problem. You're guide also seems to contradict what you stated in this post but hey, I told you I read your guide a few times put I suppose that doesn't stop you from posting the form post to it again. I appreciate your effort and time, I don't appreciate your attitude. If I'm mistaken about your attitude and it's just the internet getting in the way of clear communication again I sincerely apologize.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
It's actually quite easy. Just set your dremel at a lower speed setting (I used 5k RPM) with a light alloy buffing compound and a dense cotton buffing wheel. Move it in a figure eight motion without letting it sit on the metal static for any period of time, and when it looks shiny, you're done! Hardly a minute of work and the results are flawless!
buffed my feed ramp, got it lookin shiny, (though I couldn't get two crevices to the bottom of my feed ramp, but I dont think those are an issue), so that pretty much narrows it down to mag issues (which ill admit, ive been shooting it so often I haven't left the mags fully loaded for a week.)
 

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:D You GOTTA leave the mags loaded at least a week... 2 weeks is better, all the time is a good as it gets. Don't shoot up everything at the range. Save enough rounds to fill up your mags. It will really make a difference!
Jim
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
:D You GOTTA leave the mags loaded at least a week... 2 weeks is better, all the time is a good as it gets. Don't shoot up everything at the range. Save enough rounds to fill up your mags. It will really make a difference!
Jim
yeah, I think I just needed to get over the initial need to break in the gun itself and now im out of money to spend on ammo anyway....so now im breaking in the mags with my last 20 rounds (id never use all my ammo at the range...what's the use of having a gun if you might need it only to be out of ammo!?) but yeah, last time I shot it which was about 6 days ago, I went through 6 magazines with 1 jam, so things are certainly getting better, im optimistic.
 
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