C9: Bent Firing Pin or Something Else?

Discussion in 'Hi-Point Pistols' started by apx31025, Sep 21, 2015.

  1. apx31025

    apx31025 Member

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    Started having some feeding problems where spent rounds ended up sideways in the chamber without ejecting completely. When manually working the slide, noticed that the last 1/4" felt like it was dragging because it took extra effort to pull the slide back that last 1/4".
    Called HP and was sent a free new stryker along with the two associated springs. USPS tracking shows that the parts took 12 days from shipping until delivery to me. Put in the new parts, yet the original problem described above continues! :(
    My guess was that the firing pin was somehow bent where the slender part joins onto the base of the stryker. But installing a whole new stryker resulted in the very same problem . . .
    Ideas? I'll be calling HP tomorrow.
     
  2. Think1st

    Think1st Supporting Member

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    It almost sounds like you are have extractor issues, then. If the extractor isn't holding onto the case rim properly, then the ejector/striker would just simply kick the case sideways, without it pivoting out the ejection port around the extractor.
     

  3. ratchowmein

    ratchowmein Member

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    Your main spring and guide rod looked ok?
     
  4. apx31025

    apx31025 Member

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    Could it be that if the stryker drags/resist that last 1/4" of travel then the empty casings might be extracted so that the casings don't get ejected properly/consistently from the chamber?

    Talked to HP tech just a few minutes ago. Was told that the stryker is supposed to drag/resist the last 1/4" of its travel through the small hole in the slide(!). I did not expect to hear that. The tech explained that the last part of travel of the slide has increased resistance because of the effect of the spring compression. I explained that when I remove the slide from the frame that when I use a small screwdriver to push on the back of the stryker that the stryker slides smoothly along its length of travel until the last 1/4". Mind you, this is without using the springs at all. The HP tech said this is what is supposed to do . . .
    I also have a HP JHP, and I removed the slide for it and used a small screwdriver to nudge the stryker towards the firing pin hole. When the stryker is pushed until it is against the firing pin hold, there is no dragging or resistance during its entire length of travel.
    I went outside (I live in the country) and fired three 8-round magazines with the C9. With each magazine there were 1 to 2 ejection incidents. One incident resulted in the empty casing being flipped 180 degrees onto the point of the ejector and required manual clearing. One incident resulted in a jam with an empty casing at the top of the breech and with an unfired round clear of the magazine lips and partially fed into the firing chamber. Another ejection incident resulted in an empty casing getting caught in the slide after turning 90 degrees so that the projectile end of the casing was pointing to the right and with the primer end of the casing still caught in the slide. Also there was an incident when a round was fired and the slide came back and stayed back for a fraction of a second before the slide came forward again and loaded the next round.
    Because the firing pin is used in the ejection process, does it seem likely that the timing of the ejection is being affected when the slide is dragging during its last 1/4" of travel going back and then when the slide is dragging during its first 1/4" of travel as the slide comes back forward again?

    A minute ago I called the HP tech again. He said since parts were sent and didn't fix things then the gun needed to be sent in.
     
  5. Think1st

    Think1st Supporting Member

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    What you're describing, with regards to that resistance in the last 1/4" of compression, is definitely the spring compression building as the slide reaches the rear-most part of the travel. The two springs behind the striker compress pretty heavily at that point.

    The fact that your striker is providing enough force to spin the casings around doesn't really indicate a problem with it. It really does sound like your extractor isn't holding onto the rim as the slide goes back. Try removing the slide, placing a casing under the extractor, against the breech block face, and then see if the casing can move forwards and backwards from the face. If it moves much, then it is not being held by the extractor. Also, make sure that the extractor doesn't have any crud in the groove. This can compromise its grip on the case rim.

    As far as the slide hesitating at the rear before returning to battery goes, I have had that happen with other pistols if they dry out from heavy use (M9) or if the pistol is really new (JHP). You may just need to make sure that you do have the pistol sufficiently lubed and/or keep putting more rounds through it until it smooths out.

    By the way, can you post a picture of your striker?
     
  6. apx31025

    apx31025 Member

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    From observation my conclusion is that the resistance in the last 1/4" of compression was not because of the springs but because of the rubbing of the firing pin along the last 1/4" of its travel through the firing pin hole in the slide. My observation was that as I removed the slide from the frame that I could manually slide the firing pin along its entire length of travel. As I did that, I noticed that the firing pin/stryker piece would slide along without resistance until the final 1/4" of the firing pin was inserted into the firing pin hole in the slide. Also observed that there was the same resistance during the first 1/4" of travel when extracting the firing pin/stryker from the firing pin hole in the slide. All this was done with the springs moved back so they did not make contact with the firing pin/stryker.
    Visual inspection of the firing pin did not detect any bending of the firing pin. Could it be that the base of the firing pin was manufactured out of spec so that it is a smidgen too big to easily slide in and out of the firing pin hole?
    For comparison, I removed the slide from the JHP and also pushed the firing pin/stryker piece along its entire length of travel. On the JHP, that piece moves fully into and out of the firing pin hole without any resistance. I think the C9 should also work like that.
    Also think that it is likely that the dragging firing pin/stryker plays into the ability of the C9 to consistently and properly eject spent rounds.
    Anyway, I've sent the whole C9 to HP.
     
  7. apx31025

    apx31025 Member

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    Yesterday HP got the C9 that I shipped to it. I called HP and spoke to the lady who confirmed that it was received. I asked what the expected turn-around time would be for the repair. She said 2-3 weeks. I replied 2-3 weeks? She said yes. I said OK, then.

    2 - 3 weeks???
     
  8. talon

    talon the banned wagon

    2 likely reasons.
    1) your not the only customer
    2) better to tell you longer and return it sooner, then tell you sooner and it take longer because of reason 1.
     
  9. FlashBang

    FlashBang I Stand With Talon Lifetime Supporter

    Sounds more like a wrist issue then a firing pin issue.... just saying. :)

    .
     
  10. ajole

    ajole Supporting Member

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    This isn't a "feeding problem", it's an extraction/ejection problem.

    Seriously...you ignored all advice and just sent it in?

    Did you try other types of ammo?

    Check the "ejector key", commonly known as an extractor?

    Let someone else shoot the gun?

    Oh well...in a few weeks, (which is an EXTREMELY short time to get a gun repaired by a factory, BTW) then you will be able to start over.
     
  11. apx31025

    apx31025 Member

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    Maybe.
    Additional information - I'd sent the C9 back to HP twice during the last two years. In both those instances, I'd gotten it back in about a week. Which was close to what HP said it would be.
    There's the adage that "Past performance is not a guarantee of future performance".
    Some fellow posters have described "the way things are now" at HP compared to "the way that they remembered it used to be". I've posted what was told to me now compared to what was told to me at earlier times.
    Maybe it'll come back in about a week, irregardless?
    It's not a big issue to me, even if it was a surprise.
     
  12. talon

    talon the banned wagon

    Right, exactly what i said.
    Better to tell you it will take longer as return it early.........
     
  13. moona11

    moona11 King of you Monkeys Lifetime Supporter

    Remington takes about 6 weeks to get a weapon back. LEO weapons about 2 weeks. So 2 weeks for HP is good. Got that little info from the head of the union at Remington.
     
  14. ajole

    ajole Supporting Member

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    So basically, an organization that got a price cut and has lots of resources and spare weapons to issue, or the individual that works for them and should have access to a spare gun, gets preferential treatment, while individuals that payed full retail and may not have a backup get pushed to the rear of the line?

    Nice.:cool:
     
  15. apx31025

    apx31025 Member

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    The C9 was shipped to HP because the stryker would not travel freely because it would drag when the last 1/4" of the stryker (when 1/4" from the base of the stryker) would travel through the firing pin hole.
    The shipment made it to HP on September 28.
    On October 11, I called HP to inquire about the repair. Was told it was shipped back that day and would be delivered the next day. Was told that an adult had to sign for the delivery.
    It was delivered on October 12. A short note was handwritten that explained that the frame was rebuilt and a new slide was installed. Also said it was test-fired and a extra magazine was added for my trouble.

    Loaded two 8-round magazines and two 10-round magazines with FMJ. The C9 fired flawlessly except that the two 10-round magazine each had one instance when the third round from each of those two magazines completely cleared the magazine but did not load into the chamber. The two 8-round magazines had no problems at all.
    However, the slide action is working great. When the slide is removed and the stryker is manually cycled through its full travel path by pushing with a small screwdriver, the stryker moves without dragging during its full travel length. Before this repair, it would drag badly during its last 1/4" of travel when fully inserted into the firing pin hole.

    It is great that HP solved the problem. It is a mystery how only the 1/4" of the firing pin closest to the base of the stryker would drag when pushed into the firing pin hole.
     
  16. I'm afraid that it is that way with most business. Group buys even at reduced price often get preferential treatment, it may even be in the contract.

    Not a problem with HP, I don't think they get any government contracts.
     
  17. ratchowmein

    ratchowmein Member

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    So this was the third time back. What was the diagnosis from the other returns, was it related?
     
  18. ajole

    ajole Supporting Member

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    I just can't stand it any longer....


    STRIKER: also known as a firing pin.

    [​IMG]


    STRYKER: you can't fit this inside an HP gun, no matter how hard you try.;)

    [​IMG]
     
  19. ratchowmein

    ratchowmein Member

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    Uhoh, the RED PEN came out!
     
  20. apx31025

    apx31025 Member

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    This third time was different, with both the symptoms and the solutions. This time, the slide was replaced and frame was "rebuilt". "Rebuilt" was not explained.
    Checked it out and could tell that the problem was addressed by removing the slide and pushing the :hyper:STRIKER:hyper: with a small screwdriver to verify that the firing pin effortlessly traveled its full length through the firing pin hole without any detected dragging.
    Operates great with the two eight-round magazines. The two ten-round magazines often (maybe 50%) result in a single "failure to load" per loaded magazine (usually with the third round in the magazine) where an unfired round has cleared the magazine but won't get loaded into the barrel. All this happens regardless of brand of ammo (all 115g FMJ standard pressure, brass or steel). Those two ten-round magazines have never been 100% because they've always been like that for me. I expect the problem to be solely with those two 10-round magazines (and not the gun) because the two 8-round magazines haven't "failed to load" the unfired round into the barrel at all.