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Ladies and Gentlemen: Let me be clear, I am NOT a Hi Point hater.

I am a newbee to firearms, and have recently purchased a 995TS, a Ruger P95 and three (3) C9 comps (two for gifts to immediate family). I have not fired Walthers, S&Ws, Keltechs, Glocks, clocks or socks. I can only compare what I see and handled in in the gun stores and what I have fired and owned. I have now put about 200 rounds through the 995Ts and P95, and about 100 through the C9 Comps.

Let's face it. The C9 comp is an inexpensive handgun with compromises in materials, design and manufacturing. There is a reason I could buy three C9s for the price I paid for one Ruger P95.

The P95 came with two (2) 15 round stainless steel magazines, a loading tool, and a plastic hard case.

The P95 magazines are manufactured from a lower gage (thicker) metal than the C9s mags. The thicker metal makes the forming of the feed lips stronger, therefore presenting the round correctly to the feed mechanism. This means fewer failure to feeds (FTF). Today I experienced three FTFs from three new HP 10 round magazines.

The P95s feed mechanism positively presents the round into the chamber. The C9 feels less sure.

There are many other differences in materials and manufacturing. However, there is the difference in price.

For the price, the C9 Comp is a functional firearm that needs work to be reliable. I'm willing to do the work to break-in the C9s and magazines to get a reliable firearm.
 

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Granted that I bought my C9 in a heavily used and abused state, but mine works every time I pull the trigger. The only problems I have are from a weak spring in the mag that it came with, causing jams when firing rapidly. With my 995 mags though, I can shoot all day long without problems. That may very well be because mine is broken in already, but basically every weapon has a break in period before it is functioning optimally.

I do like the Rugers though... I have a P345 myself :)

Hope you like that C9 and the P95 also!
 

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Ladies and Gentlemen: Let me be clear, I am NOT a Hi Point hater.

...Let's face it. The C9 comp is an inexpensive handgun with compromises in materials, design and manufacturing. There is a reason I could buy three C9s for the price I paid for one Ruger P95....
A gun's only job is to safely and consistently deliver a round on target. If it does that, what's the justification in a 3:1 price differential? It's not like it's got leather seats, sunroof, and a 1000-watt audio system.

The P95 magazines are manufactured from a lower gage (thicker) metal than the C9s mags. The thicker metal makes the forming of the feed lips stronger, therefore presenting the round correctly to the feed mechanism. This means fewer failure to feeds (FTF). Today I experienced three FTFs from three new HP 10 round magazines.
The C9 has a reputation for flawless feeding after it's been broken in and, in some cases, mods are done the the magazine lips, thinner gauge metal notwithstanding.

...The P95s feed mechanism positively presents the round into the chamber. The C9 feels less sure.
How it 'feels' is irrelevant if it works.

...There are many other differences in materials and manufacturing. However, there is the difference in price...
For around $200, you can get a reliable, accurate firearm. If you want it to have a better-looking finish, it will cost a little more. If you want it small and/or light, expect to pay more. If you want a big-name brand, it will cost even more. If you want it to include a logo'd carrying case and spare magazines, it will cost still more. All of these are incidental to the firearm's purpose.

...For the price, the C9 Comp is a functional firearm that needs work to be reliable. I'm willing to do the work to break-in the C9s and magazines to get a reliable firearm.
Some will say all semi-autos need breaking in. And some Hi-Point are flawless right out of the box. That being the case, the only difference, therefore, is price and 'racing stripes'.
 

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You do get what you pay for when dealing with Hi-Point firearms.

I personally like to class my handguns into different areas. The Hi-Point C9 is what I like to classify as a simple defensive firearm. If you are using it for the purpose of defending your home or using for concealed carry, this weapon will do the job once you break it in. If you take care of the C9, it will take care of you.

My C9 is sitting in my bedroom stoked with 124 grain Eldorado Starfires at this moment (I like those PMC Starfires - good value). I have no doubt the Hi-Point will do the job that I have slated for it.

The Ruger P95 falls into a different catagory for me personally. I like to think of the P95 as more of a "fighting" pistol. The Ruger P95 would be the one I would take instead of the Hi-Point in the event of an extended engagement, or some type of fight where I have to be offensive in some form. The higher capacity mags, the higher attention to detail on the ergonomics, the higher quality materials, and the aftermarket support (30+ round hi-cap magazines, tactical lights/lasers, night sights) make it a worthwhile deal for the 300 or so dollars spent.

It's unfair to compare the C9 with the P95 because they are two different things altogether. Compare the C9 with it's direct competition, which is the JA-9 from Jimenez, and something like the FS380 from Cobra Arms, and you'll see where the Hi-Point outshines the competition.
 

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SGT-MILLER -

Your distinctions, while clear, comprehensive, and articulate, are moot for 99% of us. The fact that a P95 would suit one better in an 'extended engagement' is a useless distinction to those of us who will never see anything approaching that. If your livelihood exposes you to those circumstances, then by all means arm yourself with what you feel is necessary, and Godspeed and good luck to you.

A rebuttal to the "you get what you pay for" statement - if that were true, then all $200 pistols would be the same. They're not. All $300 pistols would be the same. They're not. And so on.
 

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My whole point is why compare two pistols in two different classes?

That's like trying to compare a revolver to an auto-loader. It just doesn't jive.

It's up to your personal tastes in the end. I own the C9 and the P95. I also own an XD9, and a few other makes of pistols. The C9 is a great, great little gun, but it's not THE gun. Zamak has it's limitations, the capacity has it's limitations, and the design of the C9 has it's limitations. You gotta keep it real here.

For defensive work, the C9 will do the job, and do it well as long as it's within certain conditions. For the regular civilian sheepdog, the C9 will be enough firepower to get the job done. If you desire more firepower, you can go with the .40 S&W or the .45 ACP chamberings. If you want something that is more versatile, you need to look elsewhere.

If you watch any of my vids on youtube, you'll see how much I like my C9, and how much I defend it. The C9 isn't for everybody or every situation, though.
 

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the hipoints have had a few documented cases of the magazine spring breaking into pieces. i've never seen that with any other firearm manufacturer. most of the time, cheaper mag springs will lose their tension. also i have yet to see so many adjustments that had to be made to factory mags to get them to work. i know aftermarket mags are hit or miss but i've yet to run across another manufacturer with such high failure rates in the magazines.

once you get the bugs worked out i'm sure it's a fine pistol but not everyone that buys a pistol for self defense will run it through it's paces. so many first time gun owners buy a gun for self protection and put it in the nightstand. for those types, i would recommend they spend a little more and get something that has a higher success rate out of the box.

that being said i bought a c9 and it's ok, not really fair to compare to it to my other pistols that cost at least 3x. the zamak slide does add a lot of weight and bulk to it. but it does go bang the few times i've had it out. to me it's a range toy, too big for a ccw and i have better pistols for home defense (in terms of trigger, magazine capacity, sights...)
 

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I don't know about comparing a Ruger to a HiPoint...gee I hope for the price the Ruger would be a "better" firearm. If thats what you need and have the bucks for buy it. I have had zero probs with my hi point .45 besides an initial break-in period to work a few feed issues out..as I understand ,and it's supported by every defensive or combat course I've seen be cause they all practice malfunction/jam drills, even the most expensive autoloader can and will jam. Lets put your p95 up against the cheapest revolver and I will bet you you have a feed/jam before I do. Does that make either firearm beter...no..it's as has been pointed out comparing apples to oranges.

Now really what I want to know because I want one is where the heck did you buy 3 comps and do they have more? Or do you want to sell your lesser performing one to buy ammo or hi cap mags for your Ruger?? Because I want a comp 9 and they're as hard to find as dragon's teeth in these parts :D

Edit to add: In keeping with the spirit of your thread let me ask you in a slightly different way. Considering the price of both guns, did you get as much as you paid for in the ruger as you did the Hi Point?
 

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I have used mine for work in a job where the reliability of the weapon could be my life. I have carried it in confidence for 5 years. Not a problem except for the mag release spring let go and was replaced in 10 minutes. I have outshot Glocks, S&W, Rugars, etc. I will keep my "cheap" gun and use it in battle the mag issue on lowcap isn't a problem [H*ll even our troops in WW2 had a rifle with 8 rounds in it and a pistol woth 7 or 8 in it aqnd THEY won the war on ALL fronts]. The amount of ammo in your weapon is minor Shot placement is all that matters You can have 50 or 100 round mags and if you can't hit the target with the first round YOU ARE DEAD!!
 

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If you feel comfortable using it as a "battle" pistol of sorts, that's great. Keep in mind that the Hi-Point was not designed for that.

The Hi-Point (all pistol models) is a great quality weapon. They have taken the formula that other SNS companies (i.e. Jimenez, Cobra, etc...) have tried to use, and made it actually work well. You won't find a better quality firearm out there for the price offered, and I encourage everyone out there to purchase at least one to see how fun and dependable these firearms can potentially be.

BUT,

The Hi-Point is NOT the pistol for everything. It's just not designed that way.

I have to say that you didn't outshoot Glocks, S&W, Rugers, etc... You outshot the owners that had them. Most pistols have about the same mechanical accuracy at 10-15 yards or so. What comes into play is the ammo used and the skill of the shooter. I have bench tested my C9, my Ruger P95, and my Springfield Armory XD9, and the C9 did come in last (but only by a very, very small margin). I believe the main reasoning for that is because the barrel is only 3.5 inches in the C9, when the barrels for the Ruger and XD9 are at 4 inches.

Your point regarding WWII doesn't really apply here, I have to say (I'm a WWII history buff). Our troops then had no issues with low-cap weapons because the opposing side had the same low-cap weapons. The Germans did have some hi-cap automatic rifles, but they weren't fielded enough to make a difference. The German Mauser rifle held 5 rounds, and the American M1 Garand held 8 rounds. What helped win the war was the amount of troops we used and the better fire rate of our M1 Garand, among tons of other reasons.

In the end, it's up to your individual tastes. If the Hi-Point works for what you are using it for, then the more power to you. Be sure to stay educated on what the pistol was designed for in the first place.
 

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Wow shooter why the sarcasm? The man isn't bashing hi point and his points seem rather well thought out with field experience to back up his own conclusions. I certainly can't make those tests because I don't own any other autos besides my hp butI certainly acknowledge there are different firearms with better fit and finish. My point about "better" was based on my own experience, I bought it to shoot paper and for HD, and I didn't have alot to spend on a pistol..did my homework and found hp fit my budget and had good word of mouth beyond the gun snobs.

That's really my point always ..buy and enjoy what you can afford but don't bash me or someone else because hp is that gun for us. I am only commenting directly on the ruger here because the OP made the comparison and to me that is the only fair comparative question. Did you get as much for the $ with each gun?
 

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I will be the first to say that I'm not the expert. I am not even close.

I am just stating my opinion for the sake of educated debate, that's all.

I assure you that I am not purposely trying to offend you or play the "I'm smart and you're not" game.

SHOOTERZ, I respect your opinion on things even if they differ from mine. Your personal experience is your personal experience, and that's that. I cannot change that, and no one here can/should try to change that.
 

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sgt-miller ,keep in mind you are saying that high-point is not designed for battle.again that's your opinion
not a fact.remember how you respond to this sound's like your a high-point designer or something.you speak
as if you know what hp guns are for.come on man,these guns are just as good as a freaking old glock which
is soo out dated in my book.stateing opinions are fine but dont make hp out to be a go and shoot for fun gun.
mine is for protection myself,i trust it and that's that.
 

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I never stated that the Hi-Point is just a "shoot for fun" gun.

From my original post on this subject:

The Hi-Point C9 is what I like to classify as a simple defensive firearm. If you are using it for the purpose of defending your home or using for concealed carry, this weapon will do the job once you break it in. If you take care of the C9, it will take care of you.
Here's another quote from an earlier post I made in this thread:

For defensive work, the C9 will do the job, and do it well as long as it's within certain conditions. For the regular civilian sheepdog, the C9 will be enough firepower to get the job done. If you desire more firepower, you can go with the .40 S&W or the .45 ACP chamberings. If you want something that is more versatile, you need to look elsewhere.
I'm not trying to make my opinion sound as fact. I have an educated opinion on the subject, and I am stating that opinion. Take that as you will.
 
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