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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just purchased a C9 on Friday and was out to the range today. Using Magtech, Tula, and ZVS ammo of the 115 grain variety. Nothing was done to the gun beforehand other than a check of the bore and keeping a full mag of ammo loaded to work the magazine spring. I did remove the magazine disconnect safety as well.

ZVS and Tula worked with no real issues. Think I had 1 FTF out of 100 rounds combined of these manufacturers.

Magtech was horrendous for FTF early on and even after firing the other brands and coming back to Magtech, still not very reliable. Will skip this brand at this point.

Total amount of rounds was 150. Would have shot more although only ammo that was left was the Magtech.

I was very impressed with the C9 during this range visit and believe that the functionality will be about 100% once I fire some more rounds down range. The trigger was crisp and not gritty at all. I seemed to be shooting low and left. Don't know if I need to adjust the sights or not as it has been a long time since I was at the range and my point of aim might be off. Hope to remedy that issue with this firearm as I do miss shooting.

As for the FTFs, I might tweak the mag lips just a hair before my next session and see if this reduces the problem. Kind of hesitant to do so since the ZVS and Tula fired without any issue. After about 100-200 more rounds, will field strip and also look at the feed ramp to see if this needs to be possibly "polished" to remove any left over powder coating.

Hi-Point has earned another satisfied customer at this point. Am already looking at buying the .40 S&W as well as the .45 ACP handguns. Eyeing those carbines as well :cool:

For those folks "on the fence" about Hi Point, my opinion is to go ahead and make the purchase. I believe you will be very happy with the decision. I know I am!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Follow-up range report

I would not adjust the feed lips right now. I would wait a few hundred rounds more tk see how it does.
2nd trip on Sunday to see if more rounds would help the FTF issues with brass cased ammo. Used Maverick and HSM 115 grain FMJs. Both are re-manufactured ammo types.

The Maverick ammo was not bad although not 100% free from issues. A couple of FTF in 50 rounds. The HSM was horrible. Loading 7 to the mag, first round would fire, 2nd round FTF. Clear and try again, same results. First would fire, 2nd round FTF. Did not even attempt to finish the 50 I had bought.

Switched to Tula and had 0 issues. My gun seems to like steel cased versus the brass. The Tula did not have that copper/brass colored bullet though, it was a silver color.



Any particular reason there is a difference in color?

So based on all the issues with the brass cased ammo, after about 250 rounds through the magazine, would you all recommend "polishing" the feed ramp and tweaking the magazine lips ever so slightly?

Love how the gun shoots as it is accurate so am definitely keeping the gun...just want to make it more reliable!
 

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The Tula did not have that copper/brass colored bullet though, it was a silver color.



Any particular reason there is a difference in color?
The not-quite-copper color on most of those post-communist steel cased imports is "tombac" coated steel jackets.

Tombac is a copper alloy similar to brass. The bullets themselves are steel jacketed (mild, soft steel, practically iron). They coat/bond the Tombac on top of the steel jacket so that they have the strength & durability of a steel jacket and the corrosion resistance of a copper alloy coating.

Some ranges ban steel jacketed bullets. Many will ban them on the basis that (so they say) the steel jacketed bullets damage their bullet traps and stops. I believe this to be untrue based on the relative softness and ductility of the kind of steel used in steel jacketed bullets when compared to copper or brass jacketed bullets. This may be a misconception on the part of the range officers being confused between steel jacketed bullets and bullets with a steel core. Some ranges ban steel jacketed bullets on the basis that they are a sparking source and could potentially ignite unburned gunpowder which literally coats the floors in most indoor ranges. While this is true, I believe it to be much over-hyped due to the fact that many handgun cartridges belch out copious flames and they fail to ignite the unburned gunpowder on the floor.

The only time I've ever heard of an indoor range fire being caused by ammunition was when someone foolishly decided to use phosphorous Tracer rounds at the indoor rifle range. They were shut down for a couple of weeks repairing the damage.

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The not-quite-copper color on most of those post-communist steel cased imports is "tombac" coated steel jackets.

Tombac is a copper alloy similar to brass. The bullets themselves are steel jacketed (mild, soft steel, practically iron). They coat/bond the Tombac on top of the steel jacket so that they have the strength & durability of a steel jacket and the corrosion resistance of a copper allow coating.

Some ranges ban steel jacketed bullets. Many will ban them on the basis that (so they say) the steel jacketed bullets damage their bullet traps and stops. I believe this to be untrue based on the relative softness and ductility of the kind of steel used in steel jacketed bullets when compared to copper or brass jacketed bullets. This may be a misconception on the part of the range officers being confused between steel jacketed bullets and bullets with a steel core. Some ranges ban steel jacketed bullets on the basis that they are a sparking source and could potentially ignite unburned gunpowder which literally coats the floors in most indoor ranges. While this is true, I believe it to be much over-hyped due to the fact that many handgun cartridges belch out copious flames and they fail to ignite the unburned gunpowder on the floor.

The only time I've ever heard of an indoor range fire being caused by ammunition was when someone foolishly decided to use phosphorous Tracer rounds at the indoor rifle range. They were shut down for a couple of weeks repairing the damage.

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
Thanks for that info klawson, much appreciated. In the meanwhile, I did polish the feed ramp and ever so slightly, tuned the magazine. At the range today and it was almost flawless. Had a couple FTF with Magtech although I had loaded 8 rounds rather than 7. Both times it was the second round that did not feed. HMS and Tula ran with no issues. Was even hitting a steel gong at 50 yards which might not be impressive for others however I was fairly stoked. C9 continues to get better and better. Might start adjusting the back site now as I seem to be hitting low.

Will hopefully have the JHP or JCP within the next couple of weeks. So glad I decided to try Hi-Point...no turning back now!
 

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Some indoor ranges have shredded tires in the bases of their traps these can ignite but I doubt that a steel or steel core bullet could cause it. The range fire in Dallas was due to some idiot shooting tracers. Needless to say he is being sued by the range.
 

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crap I'm getting my C9 next week and thought I would stock up on some ammo so I would be ready to go to the range and guess what I bought.... yep Magtech just my luck guess I will have to grab a few other brands when I pick it up.
 

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For those folks "on the fence" about Hi Point, my opinion is to go ahead and make the purchase. I believe you will be very happy with the decision. I know I am!
Welcome to the Forum! I had a similar experience, and I have no problems recommending the C9 to anyone.

I'm not yet sure why some ammo feeds better than others, but I haven't used that many variations... I've run 50 rounds of Magtech, 200 rounds of Perfecta, and another 200 rounds of Federal Champion Aluminum case with a no problems.

The only FTEs I had were due to limp-wristing, which was quickly corrected.

Enjoy your new gun!
 

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ok so went out to the range and shot 150 rounds 50 magtech rest herters all fired very well I did have 3 ftf but think it was my fault.
 

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Some indoor ranges have shredded tires in the bases of their traps these can ignite but I doubt that a steel or steel core bullet could cause it. The range fire in Dallas was due to some idiot shooting tracers. Needless to say he is being sued by the range.
Our range excludes anything a magnet will stick to. When asked, what you just posted was the reason. Although only a remote possibility, it's still a possibility.
 

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The FTF isnt caused by the magazines. Some ammo had hard primers, alot of the European Ammo has Military/Hard Primers. The Civilian/Commercial Ammo has softer primers. Hard primers lead to FTFs

The ammo is just a cheaper steel case instead of aluminum or brass.

Pick the ammo that works 100% of the time and stick with that brand.
 

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Steel jacketed bullets? Do they increase barrel wear or is the steel soft enough to be ok?
Very soft steel. Unhardened/unquenched.

It probably does wear the barrel a tiny bit faster but not so much that any of us are likely to notice it during normal use. Someone who does daily mag-dumps in their AR or something might see a somewhat shorter lifespan, but otherwise, not a big worry.

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
 
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