Can somebody please explain powders?

Discussion in 'Reloading Room' started by mrgreen, Jan 10, 2015.

  1. mrgreen

    mrgreen Member

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    Just would like to know the basics and what to use for say .45 ACP and basic .223 and stuff for types and kinds.

    TIA
     
  2. SWAGA

    SWAGA No longer broke... Lifetime Supporter

    I hate to be a stick in the mud here but no offense....buy a couple of books.
    Reloading ( which I don't) is not something you learn from a couple of posts on a forum.
    We also do not allow the posting of "recipe's" aka bullet weights and powder loads as this is a tremendous liability if you have a ka-boom as a result of somebody maliciously posting BS.
    Maybe this is helpful:

    https://books.google.com/books?id=b...eloading&pg=PP1#v=onepage&q=reloading&f=false
     

  3. undeRGRound

    undeRGRound ROLL wif Da MOLE! Supporting Member

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  4. That's a reloading book and not a powder book. I've yet to see reloading book that had very much information of powder. About the only thing about powder that is in a reloading book is the charts that show the relative mass burn rate of powders.

    I'd love to find a reloading book that gave the pressure range for a given powder. Even an old reloading book that didn't have the new powders in would be nice.

    Easy of ignition and the pressure the powder ignites at would be nice also.

    A book on powder that is useful would be something like:
    "Propellants and Explosives Thermochemical Aspects of Combustion" by Dr. Kubota. A book like this would require most to do a little studying other sources to figure out what is being talked of.
     
  5. undeRGRound

    undeRGRound ROLL wif Da MOLE! Supporting Member

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    That is a good one, WW! If you had about 3 powders to choose from, you can find their relative spots on the chart and then decide.
     
  6. mrgreen

    mrgreen Member

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  7. mrgreen

    mrgreen Member

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    This is a great post and i agree!

    I was not looking for a reloading book but info about powders, hence the title but i will look elsewhere i did not realize i was asking to break the rules:rolleyes:
     
  8. You didn't ask anything that is break the rules. The owner of the forum merely doesn't want detailed load data posted on the forum.
     
  9. SWAGA

    SWAGA No longer broke... Lifetime Supporter


    That really reads like you're looking for recipes but we'll chalk that up to static in the atmosphere or something.......;)
     
  10. undeRGRound

    undeRGRound ROLL wif Da MOLE! Supporting Member

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    There are plenty of other forums that do offer loading data, however, they are very much more geared towards that level of expertise. They do, however, have disclaimers and warnings! :eek:
     


  11. Take a look at a Lyman manual. They go into a lot of detail on all aspects or reloading. That's why I think they are the best choice for a beginner. An even better choice is to learn from an old timer, who still has all his fingers. :D
     
  12. I've read the Lyman manual. Got my first Lyman manual when I was 14 years old. They really don't have anything about powder that is helpful beyond the most basic of information.

    Lee's book is more helpful, as it at least tells one how to go about picking a powder to try and expect a good result.
     
  13. lklawson

    lklawson Staff Member

    I don't know if it's what you're after, but The American Rifle: A Treatise, a Text Book, and a Book of Practical Instruction in the Use of the Rifle, Townsend Whelen has a full chapter on "Modern Powders" but it's old stuff. No "Titegroup" or "Red Dot" or anything like that. It has some discussion of ignition rates and primer ignition but I don't know if it's what you're looking for. Has a number of the powders pictured under significant magnification. In his section on reloading, he has a fair number of rifle cartridges and ballistic charts for powder charges and bullet weights, as well as an independent chapter on "The A.B.C. of Rifle Ballistics."

    He also wrote a manual specifically on ballistics, though that doesn't appear to be available digitally. :)

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk
     
  14. Kirk,

    Thanks for the link has reading anything by Whelen is time well.

    Personally, I'm not looking for a book on commercial powders. Over the years I've learned what I need to know about them from a reload aspect.

    What I am interested in with powder is DIY smokeless. Currently those made from RDR, HMX, etc.
     
  15. mrgreen

    mrgreen Member

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    yes, and no. The title which you read first asked for a explanation of powders, there are different types are there not?

    I see where in the post it sort of asks for a what type to use and i did specify a caliber but not really sure i really asked for a recipe and if i did sorry
     
  16. FlashBang

    FlashBang I Stand With Talon Lifetime Supporter

    The primary types of powders are ball, stick, and flake. The manufacturers of powders make different formulations for use in reloading based on burn rate, pressure curve, and other variables. To give an explanation of the differences in all these formulations and types of powders would be near impossible as they will also perform differently based on caliber being used in, grains being used, whether it is used with a magnum vs normal primer, and whether you are using them for subsonic, supersonic or compressed loads.

    Each manufacturer publishes a general load chart for their powders, but even they do not have an all encompassing list of all possible loads, calibers, and/or uses.

    .
     
  17. lklawson

    lklawson Staff Member

    Sounds interesting, but a little scary.

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk
     


  18. AHHH, you are interested in losing some fingers, or possibly worse. There is a BIG difference between smokeless powder (which a propellent) and explosives. :eek:
     
  19. It is interesting, but it's not scary at all. Just don't hold the rifle when testing a charge that there is ever a remote possibility of a problem.

    FWIW. I've made and used pounds of DIY smokeless powder and have never had a problem. But there is always the future for the opportunity of a problem. IMO, one should never let their guard down.