Can we talk about our favorite finger?

Discussion in 'General Hi-Point Discussion' started by desertrider, Mar 13, 2016.

  1. desertrider

    desertrider Member

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    That's right, our booger hook.

    I know what proper form is for shooting, but in my case, I have found that doing the exact opposite helps me shoot my 4595 carbine more effectively.

    Ideally you should use the first pad of your shooting finger to press rearward on the trigger. With a clean, crisp trigger I find that using the small area between the tip and middle of the first pad on my index finger gives me the best feedback of where the trigger breaks.

    My 4595 does not have a clean, crisp trigger though. I have felt worse triggers, but my carbine's is heavy with a good 4mm or so of creep.

    When using the tip of my index finger I can't consistently gauge where the break initiates. So what I've been doing goes completely against convention, but works for me.

    I have gorilla hands with banana fingers. Big, fat hands. I find that by sticking my index finger through the guard until I'm straddling the trigger with the center of the second pad of my finger, I can curl the tip of my finger back towards the grip and brace it there to keep my finger from over traveling and squeezing the trigger.

    Using the above method I can pull through the creep without jerking the trigger, and I can compose my shot before tripping the sear.

    Honestly, I only use this method when I'm zeroing an optic or during a friendly competition with someone to see who shoots better. When I'm just plinking I don't use this method as it takes more composure on my part.

    I've managed to clean up/smooth out the surfaces in relation to the trigger components and eliminated some of the "grittiness" in the trigger, but I don't know how to shorten the overtravel.

    So what do you folks find works best for you to consistently get good feedback from your Hipoint trigger?
     
  2. undeRGRound

    undeRGRound ROLL wif Da MOLE! Supporting Member

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    I wanna talk about the "stink finger" :D

    Anyway, I was taught that the joint between the tip and middle
    was the best spot, and it feels so natural to place that on the
    trigger. Better tactile feedback on that bone, than a fat pad
    on a finger tip or between joints, I believe.
     

  3. ajole

    ajole Supporting Member

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    There's a lot of things that affect shooting. With rifles I discovered the thumb makes a whole lot of difference, I simply don't wrap it all the way over the stock, it stays on the right side. I don't know how, but it seems to make me more consistent.

    I tend to use the pad of my finger, but I go nearly all the way down to the joint. I also try not to make the finger pivot at the lowest knuckle, I try to pivot on the middle knuckle.

    Of course, that is for slow target shooting. I'm less specific if I'm doing some type of SD training. Then, I use the joint.
     
  4. FirearmFanatic

    FirearmFanatic "The Enabler!"

    I use whatever SHE prefers, that way I usually can go back for more! :rofl:
     
  5. moona11

    moona11 King of you Monkeys Lifetime Supporter

    So many places to go here
     
  6. desertrider

    desertrider Member

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    It's all good!:D

    Next on the topic of fingers is maintenance and hygeine.:p
     
  7. desertrider

    desertrider Member

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    Future topic is proper tongue placement.

    Speaking for myself, whenever I'm really concentrating and doing precision work, I tend to tense up and grit my teeth or hold my lapper in just the right spot.

    I can't be the only person who does this, am I?:blush:
     
  8. desertrider

    desertrider Member

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    I'm gonna try that. I have that strong prehensile urge to strangle a stock or pistol grip when I shoot, probably reinforced by years of riding motorcycles.


    This is exactly what I do when shooting my AR's. I run Geissele triggers on two of my AR's and a Timney on my LR308. All of them have clean, crisp, and consistent trigger breaks. I find that by pivoting my middle knuckle, the "sweet spot" for me is right between the tip of my index finger and the middle of the pad.

    All that goes out the window for plinking and SD training, same here.
     
  9. lklawson

    lklawson Staff Member

    This is an old subject. I can document it going back a fair ways.

    In modern context, the first pad/tip of the finger is really only used for light, SA triggers. For heavier, longer triggers, such as DA, or some sort of quasi-DA, the first joint or the middle-pad, depending on which source you prefer.

    Another issue is that of "training consistency." With a competition grade, light, sweet, SA trigger (like a tuned 1911), theoretically, you can get far better precision with just the first pad. But if you routinely carry a DA/SA or partially cocked semi-DA striker (*coughGLOCKcough*) you should probably just stick with the first joint all the time and accept that you'll suffer some small loss of accuracy which could theoretically be achieved when in SA or with a better trigger. Your groups may be 1" instead of touching. :wah: I'm sure the bad guy will fault you for your slightly lower accuracy and prefer to be shot by a custom 1911 with the shooter using the tip of his trigger finger.

    In the end, practice using several different trigger press methods and stick with the one which gives you the most consistent accuracy under stress across all the firearms platforms you'll be using.

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk
     
  10. desertrider

    desertrider Member

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    See post #6 above.;)

    That's what I do for 90% of my shooting, which is mostly plinking and SD training.

    The 10% of my shooting is for accuracy and when sighting in optics or irons. That's when I take extra time to compose my shots and practice breathing, finger placement, etc.
     
  11. lklawson

    lklawson Staff Member

    With a traditionally shaped stock, sure. But with a pistol-grip stock like DR's 4595? I'm not trying to kibitz, I'm just trying to picture it.

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2016
  12. desertrider

    desertrider Member

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    Actually, I'm willing to give it a shot and see how it goes. Keep in mind, I've got really big hands and a strong grip, so I'm confident I won't be endangering my or anyone else's safety.

    I'm looking for options for that 10% of the time I need maximum accuracy when shooting.
     
  13. Hansj3

    Hansj3 Supporting Member

    Back to the op's post, it's recommended in some da/SA revolver circles to grasp the trigger with the last joint of the index, when fireing da. And being a new revolver owner I cam see why.

    I've got huge hands as well, and am also a mechanic, so I have the whole ham hocks with bratwurst dangling thing going on as well.

    I couldn't fire my 995 with much more than a latex glove on
     
  14. ajole

    ajole Supporting Member

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    Quit trying, I was talking about real rifle stocks, not pistol grips.:D

    On a pistol grip...you grip it.;)

    And then you use the part of your finger determined by the shooting you are doing.

    Light trigger on a target trying to get groups...pad.

    Trying to knock down X targets in Y seconds...the joint, just because it's easier to keep the finger in the right place while transitioning between targets at one station.

    Obviously, that finger comes off when moving between stations.
     
  15. lklawson

    lklawson Staff Member

    Oh good. I was afraid old age was catching up with me finally. :)

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk