Canik tp9SA v glock 17 video

Discussion in 'Gun Reviews and Range Reports' started by 841gun, Sep 4, 2015.

  1. 841gun

    841gun Member

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    Hey guys,

    Did a video review of these two great pistols.

    [ame]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B98rAdqkzcI[/ame]
     
  2. Kiln

    Kiln Member

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    The TP9SA has entered the shooting world with a bang, if you'll excuse the expression. The gun has an excellent trigger, great capacity, is inexpensive, and is backed by a lifetime warranty. The decocker turns a lot of people off but it takes quite a bit of pressure to activate. Vif you consider it major problem you can either wait for the SF version to import next year or if you're mechanically inclined you can easily deactivate the decocker.
     

  3. ajole

    ajole Supporting Member

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    I don't get why people complained about the de-cocker on the original model. Are their precious digits too finely tuned to handle a DA trigger pull?

    And then...the new model just...makes the trigger go dead? You have to rack the slide, I assume, to get back in the game?

    I don't know...I think I'd prefer the de-cocker model. Maybe they'll be cheaper, now!
     
  4. Kiln

    Kiln Member

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    The original TP9 trigger sucks, to put it mildly. It's bad enough that it will throw off most shooters' accuracy. The SA model was (in many people's opinions) most likely a lazy attempt to sell a gun with a better trigger without a major redesign of the slide. Problem is that yes, the decocker leaves you with a dead trigger requiring you to reset the striker by racking the slide.

    Thing is, there's a simple fix that involves inserting an object under the decocker in the dual springs to block it from working. It can be done in minutes if it's a big deal to you and is a simple solution that is easily reversable.

    Otherwise the SF model (SA trigger with no decocker) is slated to import in 2016.
     
  5. Come on! If it doesn't have a light switch trigger the tactikewl guys can't shoot it. Let alone a longer DA trigger pull. While I am just kidding, some shooters just seem to be pansies. I thought the DA/SA original was a great idea for a striker fired gun.

    I can see where the decocker would be dangerous, and in a gun grab situation an advantage. Sorta like the mag disconnect on some guns, if someone is trying to snatch the gun, and you can't get control, hit the mag release. It would give enough time to get the backup.
     
  6. ajole

    ajole Supporting Member

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    At what range? At SD ranges, it's simply not an issue, IMHO. I truly believe that first shot in SD will be nearly unaimed point shooting as you get the gun into action. If they are far enough away to require aiming...it may not be SD yet.

    If you were doing 3 gun competition, shooting strings of 14 plates at 15 yards, I might buy the argument.
    But most folks aren't buying $300 guns for that.;)


    Yep, that's a mess, I agree with your theory.


    SF for an actual safety, or are they sticking with the Glock style "safety unless something pulls the trigger" non-safety?
     
  7. Kiln

    Kiln Member

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    1. Plenty of people are picking them up as an alternative to higher dollar guns for target practice and range use. Not everyone who buys one intends to use it strictly for defense. While not absolutely necessary, a good trigger is a major plus point and can help it win out over similarly priced handguns from their competitors. Seems that they're good enough for police/military use overseas but not good enough for the American market that has been spoiled by the very competetive and constantly evolving firearm market.

    2. Still not a deal breaker though as it is easy to disable and seems difficult to accidentally decock anyways.

    3. I think the SF model stands for "Special Forces" and is intended for sale to gun owners who don't want things like a LCI or decocker. I believe the intention was similar to Ruger's "pro" series guns that lack features considered unnecessary by more experienced shooters.
     
  8. ajole

    ajole Supporting Member

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    Neither of which should be a problem for a decocker. Just don't decock it, and there ya go!

    Strange how easy it is to solve other people's problems.:p

    I agree with you about the spoiled American market.


    You mean...they want a Glock copy. Got it.
     
  9. Kiln

    Kiln Member

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    Not exactly, the TP9SA is a true single action. I prefer not to overgeneralize and say "all plastic guns are Glock wannabes" because there are a lot of defining features and differences between the plethora of different makes and models of polymer guns. That's like saying that almost all revolvers are the same because they're metal and are some combination of DA/SA.
     
  10. Almost all guns fire by pulling the trigger. Similar trigger pull, similar firing pin block, similar reset would mean the guns are similar whether they are a Glock or a TP9SA.

    Maybe that is why there are so many ND's, people are more worried about how a guns trigger works than the safety of using it properly.

    A trigger is a trigger is a trigger, if pulled and the gun goes bang does not matter how, IMO. What matters is doing it safely.
     
  11. ajole

    ajole Supporting Member

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    Sure. And like a Glock, has no safety except the bladed trigger, and must be racked to reset the trigger.

    See what I mean.;)
     
  12. Kiln

    Kiln Member

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    Now I see what you mean. The RG40 and Colt Detective special are actually identical because they're both double/single action! You've opened my eyes!

    The Raven MP25 and Baby Browning are the same gun too! Wait till I tell THR!
     
  13. The Colt python, and the S&W 586 are both DA/SA revolvers, but the the 586 has a full barrel lug CLEARLY copying the python. Same thing for the Ruger GP100 that followed the 586, and Python, and now Taurus, and Rossi have a full under barrel lug.

    I don't know of any gun made before the Glock with a bladed trigger. The trigger pull is near identical between the TP, and the Glock, and same with the reset. I would say it is a safe bet they copied the Glock trigger feel to entice that market.
     
  14. ajole

    ajole Supporting Member

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    Geeze...you obviously don't get what I mean, and I'm sure the guys at THR wouldn't get it either, you seem to have your heads too far up Gaston's hind end to see reality..:rolleyes:

    It has nothing to do with SA or DA...it has to do with the cute "safe action trigger" that Glock introduced, which is about as pointless as anything anyone put on a gun, ever. :cool:

    Honestly...how in the freak is that "safe"? How have millions of people been persuaded that that stupid blade makes any sense at all? Especially considering the number of ND's that have occurred, 90% of which could probably have been prevented by an actual safety. I mean, its so bad, they invented a name for the resulting wound!:D

    Nearly everything that will pull the trigger is going to pull that blade, too.

    As far as the way Glock uses the trigger to finish cocking the firing pin/striker...cool beans! Somehow they persuaded everyone that having a single action trigger that is a bit mushy and requires you to rack the slide to reset it is a great thing!

    Guess Sig and CZ and Taurus and Tanfoglio and Beretta are crazy to actually incorporate a DA/SA trigger and possibly decocker that actually improves safety, improves function, and feels better as well!:rolleyes:
     
  15. ajole

    ajole Supporting Member

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    Oh..good review by the OP as well!

    Kinda got lost in the discussion about the Canik.

    Notice...he likes the Canik trigger better than the Glock, even with that stupid blade.:p
     
  16. lsi1

    lsi1 Member

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    its just another striker fired semiautomatic service sized handgun with a safety system better suited for a hammer fired double strike capable gun.

    If i didn't already own glocks i'd be interested in the new model they are talking about with the sa trigger and no decocker.

    I am interested in possible aftermarket support for these guns as well because Glock has it for sure you can rebuild all the wear parts of a glock for about $30 and buy mags that actually work for $13 each and ones that might for $10.
     
  17. ajole

    ajole Supporting Member

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    That sums up my ideas as well, if I had a Glock, I wouldn't bother with the Canik.

    But for a first gun, at under $300, I'd buy it before dropping $400 on a used Glock. Sounds like it is a better deal, if you ignore the aftermarket support...and I do ignore that.:p

    I'd like to play with their original decocker version though. It offers something the Glock doesn't.
     
  18. My Glocks are the only guns I have that I sometimes think about selling. It is not the trigger, it is the grip angle. I point shoot a lot, and I always have to point low with the Glocks or I shoot about a foot above the target.

    I would probably buy a couple TP40's and sell the Glocks, but I have not seen them on any gun sales sites so far.
     
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2015
  19. Kiln

    Kiln Member

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    I actually dislike Glocks too and sold the only one I ever had. Unlike the old timers here, I seem to comprehend that the blade exists mainly as a drop safety, similar to the passive blocks in basically (a few exemptions) ALL modern handguns from striker to hammer fired ones.

    Also, don't blame the design of the gun because YOU fear that you will somehow manage to cap yourself in the leg like the countless idiots that have managed to do so in situations that were almost definitely avoidable. I've owned a dozen or more striker fired handguns and have never gotten close to shooting myself with one. The trick is training and avoidance of holsters that may trip the trigger.

    I am also not so biased that when I see anything plastic, I assume it is a Glock clone without noting major differences in design or aesthetics.
     
  20. lklawson

    lklawson Staff Member

    This is the thing right here.

    How is it a safety? The point of having a manual safety switch is to keep accidents from happening when the trigger is "accidentally" pulled. That is not prevented from having the safety switch integrated into the trigger. :p

    Oh, it's a "drop safety" is it? Lots of guns manage to put a drop safety in without actually needing a switch. Heck, Hi Point managed to figure out how to do that!

    If it's a safety then it's the stupidest safety ever thought up.

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk