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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How do you folks pronounce it? I've always called it a carbine, rhymes with wine, fine, line, twine, pine, sign.
Only recently heard it pronounced as carbeen, rhymes with lean, mean, sheen, seen, keen, spleen.

the long E pronunciation just sounds funny to me.
 

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I say it like rhymes with mine, as in I want one to be MINE!!!
 

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Bean for me..
 

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dear god not this again....

SW
AWWWWW be nice SW, there are a lot of new people here since the last time this one has went around ;)

FWIW, I say it carbIne, not carbEEn
 

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Waltham and I are both Okies. He says 'bine and I say 'bean. I guess it's fine, but what does that mean?
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
i believe it is from "karabiner" which i guess circularly is the same as "carbine" which is a term used to describe, for the most part, a shortened rifle that shoots rifle rounds at a lower velocity. as for the 995, it wasn't shortened from an existing rifle, nor does it fire rifle rounds, so i have no idea anymore.
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
according to Dictionary.com

car·bine /?k?rbin, -ba?n/ [kahr-been, -bahyn]
â€"noun 1. a light, gas-operated semiautomatic rifle.
2. (formerly) a short rifle used in the cavalry.
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Re: according to Dictionary.com

car·bine /?k?rbin, -ba?n/ [kahr-been, -bahyn]
â€"noun 1. a light, gas-operated semiautomatic rifle.
2. (formerly) a short rifle used in the cavalry.
Oh shure, get all Dictionary like on us......

I heard the Karabiner thing the other day, had something to do with german tank crews and specially shortened rifles they were issued to fit inside the tank with them.
 

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Waltham and I are both Okies. He says 'bine and I say 'bean. I guess it's fine, but what does that mean?
I dont know where my brain was when I posted, but I say carbeen, not carbine.

Pretty bad when you dont even know how you talk LOL

rileyz you know how us Okies are, we got a language all our own ;)
 

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That IS pretty funny Waltham. And now that I've re-read my post, it sounds like I was channeling Dr. Suess when I wrote it.

Mario, I ran across that same dictionary entry. Apparently, the Lexicographers say there's not really a right or a wrong way to say it. Of course, by their definitions, the 995 and 4095 aren't really carbines anyway: they're not really made for cavalry (although I suppose they wouldn't be bad for shooting from horseback) and they're certainly not gas-powered.

Interestingly, Kel-Tec calls THEIR 9mm and 40cal firearms with a 16 inch barrel a "sub rifle" rather than a carbine. They use the logic that if a pistol-caliber fully automatic "long" barrel such as the MP40 is a "sub-machine gun" then a pistol-caliber semi auto with a rifle-length barrel is a sub rifle.

This actually makes some sense, since a US carbine is, historically, a shortened version of an infantry rifle: chambered for the infantry rifle's ammo. However, there are 19th century examples of long guns specifically called "pistol caliber carbines" such as the Winchester 1894 design chambered for .44-40 or .45 Colt. In this tradition, I think of the 995 and 4095 as "pistol caliber carbines."

Izhmash calls my Saiga with the 16 inch barrel a carbine. It chambers a true "long gun" 7.62x39 round, and as such, is more of a true "carbine" than either the 4095 or 995.

I've already told ya'll how I say the word. I guess my point (assuming I actually have one) is that not everyone can even agree on exactly what the word carbine means, much less how it's pronounced.
 
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