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first :welcome: second the better question is how many DON'T carry cocked and locked.

if you are worried about safety dont, hi-points are very safe and with the manual saftey on there is no way you will get a nd. i even carried mine for a month cocked with the safety off(no round in chamber) and i did alot of running and jumping and the firing pin was never released.
 

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When I carried my C9 it was ALWAYS cocked & locked.
I even dropped it once & I can tell you that the Drop Safety absolutely does work!!!

I may start carrying it again until the weather gets cooler.
My Ruger P95 got a tad of rust on it when I wore it next to my skin & was sweating a lot.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the responses. I meant to elaborate but had to leave in the middle of my post. I don't actually have a Hipoint but have been a fan since discovering them through a friend that had one. I do plan to get one soon and couldn't imagine not keeping one in the pipe but wanted to get some feedback in case there were safety issues that I wasn't aware of. I've got some good lightweight carry options and was thinking that a Hipoint would make a good car gun.

Thanks for the welcome too!
 

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When I carry, its cocked and locked. Hipoints are safe to carry that way. The c9 is a better carry choice though. The .45 is just too heavy for my tastes as a carry piece.

And Welcome to the forum.
 

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I believe the only handgun that can be carried "cocked and locked" is a 1911 or similar. In fact the safest way to carry a 1911 is "cocked and locked".
 

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This may sound silly but, if it's safe to carry in a holster on the hip why wouldn't it be safe to carry iwb? or, if it's not safe to carry iwb, why would it be alright in a holster on the hip? lol
 

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I got a good one. I leave my .40 cocked and locked all the time. How often should I remove the magazine and just push the rounds out, and then reload. Does the spring need a rest period for longevity? Does the firing pin spring weaken over time if it stays cocked?

Just curious if there is a best practice kind of deal.

I take mine down once a week. I unload it, empty the magazine, dry fire it, then leave it alone for a couple hours as long as I don't have somewhere to go, then I put it all back together put it in the holster and put it away cocked and locked.
Is that gonna trash it?
 

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Drew68, holsterless carry inside the waistband is not a good idea for any cocked and locked single action type auto. A proper holster covers the triggerguard so even if the safety accidentally gets bumped off the trigger is protected from getting accidentally pulled. Glocks are especially bad for this type of carry, when the pistol is inserted into the waistband any protruding wad of shirt, a belt loop, etc. can grab the trigger and disengage the safety in it's face. IIRC, a plainclothes cop in FL was cuffing a suspect and shoved his Glock down the back of his pants so he would have both hands free. Boom. Early Fobus Glock holsters got recalled because the positioning of the thumbreak strap allowed it to enter the triggerguard during holstering unless it was held out of the way. One handed re-holstering could result in a "Barney Fife".

Butterbone, a well designed and made spring doesn't wear out or get damaged by continuous compression. All springs, after they are compressed for a while take a "set", that is they shorten (coil) or a slight bend remains (flat). The experienced designer will spec the spring to take this into account when he chooses which one to use. Once this initial set happens, continued normal compression will not increase it if the temper is correct. What damages a spring and can introduce too much set is overcompression. Cycling is what wears a spring out and weakens it. When a manufacturer recommends a spring replacement as preventative maintenance it is always at a round count, not a time period.

In any event, if your spring is going to go "bad" letting it "rest" is not going to improve things and the cycling required to allow this rest period is actually shortening it's life span.
 

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Good to know! Thanks Slim!!!
 
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