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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I saw a post on here last week and thought it would be a great idea for my C9. I'm not a huge fan of the powder coating(mostly because mine is dinged up a bit), I was wondering if it is possible to blue the zamak slide. Does anyone know how that would turn out? I didn't even know if it would work the way it's supposed to. I was thinking that I could blue the slide and the barrel, use plastic bonding paint to paint the frame flat black, and automotive pearl paint for the grips. Or just paint the grips white. I also want to do white dots for the sights. I know that I would have to strip the slide and prep it but didn't want to do it and the bluing not take or really f*** up my gun. So I guess I'm looking for advice and the link that was posted on how to blue correctly.
 

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I've thought about doing something similar. I think you'd have to sand off all of the powdercoat first. You might also consider duracoat, instead of cold bluing. You could certainly get a finish close to bluing, and you'll probably get a better result than DIY bluing.

but I'd like to see that link also, if someone posts it.
 

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Cold blueing wont work on Zamak. You can sandblast and paint or leave it bare for a blasted stainless type finish (think AMT). It wont rust. You can also sandblast the frame and it will lighten it up some. This would also be a good Idea if you intend to paint the frame as it will help the paint adhere to the plastic. Zamak is kind of a neat material to work with. If you blast it you will have a matte grey color. If you wipe it down with oil it will be a little darker. I have blasted a few slides and boiled them in some slightly salty water to get them to oxidize a little before putting oil on them.

If you go with paint get some paint made for finishing firearms that is solvent resistant. Brownels has some good stuff. Even the stongest paint I have found locally (appliance epoxy) with not stand up to some bore cleaners. Along with that it most paints you will buy at a local store will be too thick for firearms.

The original paint hi-point used before they started powercoating was an epoxy based paint that is very tough.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I thought about doing the duracoat but didn't know if it would have that parkerized flat black look. You would definately have to sand all of the powdercoat off before doing any changes to the finish. I saw a .25 on another thread that looked amazing after the bluing was done. It looked black and brand new. I have painted plastic many times and have around 12 years experience painting. I haven't painted many guns before. I do know that you have to be very particular about how you prep the surface before you paint and what paint you use because of the oils. I don't understand why bluing wouldn't work on zamak. I would think that after 5 coats of blue that any metal would change color. Has anyone tried to cold-blue a hi-point before?
 

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I tried oxpho blue on a blasted zamak raven slide once. It was ok. Real blotchy even after a ton of applications. Just could not get it looking right. I think some of the element in the zamak have a reaction and some dont. I could not get a uniform finish on it. It was blasted and soaking in acetone before application. Give it a shot, your results may be different. The cold blueing will come off very easily if you dont like it.

Just a tip. Cold blueing always comes out better if the metal is blasted first. On a polishied surface it can get blotchy. Blasting hides it a little better. Useing degreased steel wool to apply the cold blue helps as well. The friction help the cold blue get a better reaction to the steel.

I may try again with a hi-point slide. I am not a huge fan of painted guns. Its kind of like makeup for guns and not an actual finish.
 

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if you cold blue always put the parts in an oven and heat them up to atleast 200 degrees or close then clean them with soap and water and heat them up again and then blue them the heat helps with the blueing .if you got a heat lamp it works better i say 200 degrees but i would put the oven on warm setting and thats about 180 maybye don't cook the parts though your not powder coating them.lol
 

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You cannot blue Zemak or aluminum... the only chemical that works is aluminum black from Birchwood casey... I tried it on some nicks in powder coat and on the side stripes when I got tired of them shiney... on my C9 ...I polished the side stripes myself but after a time decided I don't like the look!

The black works but is not very durable due to the soft nature of the zemak!
 

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The reason cold bluing does not work on Hi-Points and other Zinc Alloy metal parts is because "bluing" is actually a form of controlled oxidation that keeps Rust (another form of oxidation) from occurring. ZAMAK-3 alloy does NOT rust, so therefore other forms of oxidation will not occur on the slide, including the cold bluing technique.

So, powdercoating and other poly based finished have to be employed, or you can polish the slide and it will retain it's finish pretty well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Ok. Thanks a lot guys. maybe I will try the Aluminum black and just rough the powdercoat first. That might be close enough to the look I want. Is it a flat black or glossy? I really don't want it to shine.

Has anyone ever sanded the sides of the slide more flush?
 

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I sent a picture of a CZ75b as an example to Lauer, the makers of Duracoat. They said that it was a good match for their matte black finish. My thinking was to sand the HP smooth and then duracoat it. This would give it a much more traditional "blued" look.

Just an idea, at this point.
 
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