cowboy guns

Discussion in 'General Firearms Discussion' started by greg_r, Jan 23, 2016.

  1. greg_r

    greg_r Lifetime Supporter

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    I have got a hankering for a lever action rifle/carbine and a single action pistol. Thinking about a Marlin 1894 and a Ruger Blackhawk. I know about the Remlin quality control issues, but understand those have been corrected in the past year or so.

    I'm pretty sure a member here has purchased a Marlin recently. Would sure like to hear from them about their experience.

    Another option would be a Henry and a Ruger, but I really like the 1894 a little better.

    Yet a 33rd option would be a Rossi R92 and a Heritage Big Bore. Would save me about $300 or so, but I have heard of feeding issues with the R92 and its hard to find reviews on the Heritage.

    An advantage to the Henry or Rossi is they are available in 45 Colt. The Marlin would be probably a 357. Ruger dosent make a Blackhawk in 44 Mag, and I don't really want a Super Blackhawk.
     
  2. ghostmonky

    ghostmonky Member

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    ImageUploadedByHi-Point Forum1453589529.595241.jpg
    ImageUploadedByHi-Point Forum1453589546.543704.jpg
    Here's a couple of single action Remington 1858s
    Both converted to fire cartridges.
    The blued is .45 ACP
    The SS is .45 LC.
     

  3. Bull

    Bull Just a Man Supporting Member

    I really like the stainless GM!.... That's an awesome piece...
     
  4. rickm

    rickm Member

    I got a ruger blackhawk convertible a year ago for 350, has both the 45lc and the 45acp cylinders and almost picked up a henry golden boy in 45lc today for 550 but had to walk away since it loaded from the tube instead of the side load.
     
  5. greg_r

    greg_r Lifetime Supporter

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    I kind of like the tube loading on the Henry. I like the square bolt on the 1894 though.
     
  6. duster066

    duster066 Supporting Member

    It's kind of important, but only for appearances, that both guns match cal. I have 2 mod 94 winnys in 30-30, an 1899 and a 1965. I also have a Marlin 94C. I have 2 SAA clones in 357 and a S Blackhawk in 44m.

    The win 94 looks more 19th century. The Marlin 94 is far easier to tear down and comes drilled for a rail, mine came with a weaver rail to. All shoot great. The Marlin is kind of heavy for an 18" But handles great.

    My first SAA is basically an 80s version of the Bounty Hunter. The real Colt is a medium frame gun. The Bounty Hunter is a large frame gun, so it is not a clone. Some have said due to the larger size it should be more durable. Maybe, but I shot mine out over 25 years. New parts won't fit, they've changed the base pin arrangements. But over sized Colt parts hand fit fixed the gun. It got mostly 357 and lots of honking hunting loads in the last thousand rounds. That finished it off. The rebuild was successful and it shoots good again. I've seen and shot modern Bounty Hunters. They've changed a lot all for the worst. I would not buy one.

    The other SAA is a Pietta, and is a beautiful gun. The Pietta like Uberti are true Colt clones with minor changes for import law. Mine is a cowboy action tuned model, and is so nice I'm afraid to shoot it. I save it for formal wear with rare light 38 plinking. So I can't talk to their endurance except to say no SAA will blast heavy loads for long. It's a weak design by today's standards. No need to talk about the Ruger. It's a tank.

    I will buy the first 357 Blackhawk, or New or old Vaquaro that comes along at a killer price. They are tanks and will do heavy shooting for a long time.

    The Rossi was the only gun that I saw crap out in the 2 truncated cowboy action years I did. They look good and are inexpensive. If it's just the look and cool plinking you are after I'd think one would work good. They can also be slicked up to work better.
     

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  7. rickm

    rickm Member

    I like the side loader cause its easier and faster to load than the tube load, I will more than like hold out for a rossi unless something else pops up that i like
     
  8. greg_r

    greg_r Lifetime Supporter

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    The Heritage is put together from Pietta parts and finished in the US. The firing pin has been removed from the hammer and a transfer bar installed. I can get them for just under $400. The Rossi is selling here for just under $500. I can add just under $250 to that and get a Henry and a Ruger. I like the Henry Steel. Have not priced the Marlin, but I would expect it to be a bit under the price of the Henry. I like the 45, because, well it's a 45! The 357 would probably serve better just because I already have dies and a whole bunch of boolets cast. I would need to purchase 45 colt dies, I already have the molds, I cast 250 grain wad cutters and 200 grain rf for my 45 auto rim.
     
  9. undeRGRound

    undeRGRound ROLL wif Da MOLE! Supporting Member

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    The Henry is OK for a plinker or hunter, but for SHTF or :zombie::mumy:
    a gate loader (side loader) is of extreme importance. I like to think of it
    as a "Cowboy Assault Rifle" kind of :D It can be reloaded easily, one shot
    at a time, topped off as much or as little as needed. Almost as good as a
    mag fed rifle, maybe better in some instances. My Henry is really SWEEET!
    but fast reloading is NOT part of the deal. Not at all. :eek: :(
     
  10. duster066

    duster066 Supporting Member

    I read a review that compared the Uberti, Bounty Hunter, and Heritage SAA. The Heritage came out on top. The bottom line Uberti and Pietta are available at my local cabelas for under 400 all the time. I don't like them though because the are parkerized with a brass grip frame. Both mine are blued, color case hardened frame, hammer, and trigger, with a black aluminum grip frame. I also like the 5.5" barrel, but that's just because that's what my first one is. They are loads of fun, and it takes real learned skills to use one like you know what you are doing. They can be reloaded faster than some young bucks might think.
     
  11. Fracman

    Fracman Member

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    I love some cowboy guns
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2016
  12. ajole

    ajole Supporting Member

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    Why not the Super Blackhawk? It's the same as the Blackhawk, but with steel instead of aluminum or alloy parts, as far as I have read.

    Regardless, I think I'd go .357 just due to cost.
     
  13. duster066

    duster066 Supporting Member

    The super Blackhawk is much larger than the Blackhawk. It only looks like a Colt, and then only if you are on the other side of a parking lot. It doesn't load or handle anything like a Colt. The New Vaquaro is the way to go if you want Colt looks, handling, and toughness. The old Vaquaro looks like the Colt, but is bigger, the same size as the Blackhawk. For that reason they didn't sell well to cowboy action shooters. The New Vaquaro has become the most popular SAA alternative.

    A funny unofficial rule I was taught. If you are going to use a Colt or clone you need 4 guns. 2 to shoot, 1 spare, and 1 in the shop.
     
  14. greg_r

    greg_r Lifetime Supporter

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    The super Blackhawk is larger than the Blackhawk, plus I do not like the non-fluted cylinder. I like this one.
     

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  15. ajole

    ajole Supporting Member

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    This one? It's a Super....

    [​IMG]

    I'm reading that some versions of the SBH are the same size as the Blackhawk.

    Same deal with the Vaquero, the New Model is smaller.
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2016
  16. duster066

    duster066 Supporting Member

    Looks like Ajole is about half right. The frame size appears to be the same, but there are several other variations between the two, unfluted cylinder, larger grip frame, hammer and trigger differences, and barrel differences. Most of the changes are to increase the supers weight for reduced recoil in 44mag.
     
  17. greg_r

    greg_r Lifetime Supporter

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    I would go with this one if I bought the Super Blackhawk. Don't really like silver or stainless. But they are nearly 1/2 pound heavier than the Blackhawk, and just don't feel as good in the hand to me, plus they have that ugly cylinder.

    The Vaquero was downsized for CASS. Good move by Ruger, as they now dominate there! I'm not looking for CASS though, I just want something to shoot bowling pins with, maybe a deer or a hog or two.
     

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  18. ajole

    ajole Supporting Member

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    I'm not trying to persuade you, I like the Vaquero too.

    But your reasons are just...wrong. And I am MORE than half right.

    Do you guys NOT see the fluted cylinder on the Super in my last post?:confused:

    And, it comes with a fluted cylinder in blued as well.;)

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2016
  19. duster066

    duster066 Supporting Member

    It matters what you want the gun for. The SAA is the most well balanced, natural pointing, and accurate gun I have. They almost aim themselves sort of like a goast ring sight. Because they are round and our brains naturally finds the 4 90 degree points of a circle they aim fast. The S Blackhawk is terrible compared to the SAA in all those shooting respects imo. Mine is a 7.5" so that makes the balance way off, but the weight, the square top, the cowboy grip with 44mag, the damn trigger guard eats the fingers...I don't like shooting it. Heck it took Hogue grips to even be able to shoot full house loads with any accuracy and that further dorks the balance and makes it look stupid. The Blackhawk "looks" like it'll have many if not all of those undesirable handling characteristics, but have never shot one. I'll keep the 44 and want a 357, but only because of their legendary toughness.

    If it's the cowboy experience you want you probably don't want a Blackhawk. The SAA will shoot 38spc for a long time, and can handle 357 for trail defense purposes. I was warned to stay away from them in hot 45 Colt and 44.