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Discussion Starter #1
Ordered a Marlin 1894 CSBL. I finally got the call that it was here and went to pick it up today. On first impression, it was a beautiful rile. Upon inspection I found no canted barrels, sights were straight, as were the sling swivels. But I rejected it.

Why?

Because the wood to metal fit on the right side where the stock met the receiver was off. Not bad, but enough that I could wedge a business card between the wood and metal. That alone probably would not have kept me from accepting it.

But the bolt was not flush with the receiver. Again, not much, but you could feel it and once you knew it was there it was one of those things that you saw. And once you saw it you could not un-see it.

Had this been a standard 1894, I probably would of taken it home. But this was a premium model 1894, and I was paying a premium price, only $15 short of the $1214 MSRP. Maybe I was being anal, but at the price I paid being anal was reasonable I think.

Maybe the next one will be better. And maybe it will be here by the end of the year. This one was here in just a couple of weeks, but there are no more in stock.
 

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No, you did it right. They want better than good money, they need to hand over a better than “mostly good enough” rifle.

For that money, you could get a BLR. Yeah, I know that’s a completely different gun, with no King gate and no PCC offerings and no large loop.

I’m just saying if Browning can make a ridiculously good stainless lever gun for a grand, then RemMarlington should have stepped it up a bit to play in that same price category.

They didn’t, so....good luck finding one Greg.
Maybe a Henry would make it all feel better? I know, the side loader is plastic stocked, and the large loops are carbines with no King Gate. But you get a threaded barrel with the plastic X model...:banana:
 

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Discussion Starter #3
No, you did it right. They want better than good money, they need to hand over a better than "mostly good enough" rifle.

For that money, you could get a BLR. Yeah, I know that's a completely different gun, with no King gate and no PCC offerings and no large loop.

I'm just saying if Browning can make a ridiculously good stainless lever gun for a grand, then RemMarlington should have stepped it up a bit to play in that same price category.

They didn't, so....good luck finding one Greg.
Maybe a Henry would make it all feel better? I know, the side loader is plastic stocked, and the large loops are carbines with no King Gate. But you get a threaded barrel with the plastic X model...:banana:
The Henry Steel Carbine is my second choice. And it's cheaper. I was sort of going for the Scout Rifle look. Which the Marlin gave me. For $150 I can get the XS rail and sights for my Mossberg 464 Brush gun. That's always been an option, I just wanted a 357 to pair with my SP101.
 

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Maybe Ruger will turn out some decent Marlin lever guns once they get the equipment and employees.
 

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Good call, Greggy
That is about as much as I have ever paid for a gun too, and it had better be correct when I pick it up.
 

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I was disappointed in that Christensen Arms 22 ranger I had to send it back to them once they changed out the receiver cause I could not get scope to zero out. Got it back went out and shot it was still not impressed with the bolt thought in just needed some rounds to smooth in out put 500 down it that day. Took it out yesterday screwed on the can. Shot at a 16”X16” target at 40 yards and missed it. Checked the scope thinking it might have loosened up everything was tight. It was sill tight. Tried to sight it in with the can on. No luck. Screwed the can off got it sighted in. Screwed the can back on zoomed the scope back to 6.5 power shot at a target on the ground. Saw my bullet splash 3’ high and 2’ left of the target. Took it back to the store today and got a full refund. No to find a replacement 22lr
 

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If you want to put a can on a .22 rifle, I'd buy a 10/22 take down, or a CZ 457, the American is full size, or the Scout is a smaller stock and 16" barrel, on the full size action.

All are threaded from the factory, both are $300-$400, and both are worth it.

Or just spend $1300 and get that 10/22 that's integrally suppressed.
https://www.silencercentral.com/products/ruger-silent-sr-isb-10-22/
 
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You need to look at the Winchesters. The Miroku products are great. I have been very impressed with the Model 1873 saddle ring carbine I got, and the wood went right up to the metal.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
You need to look at the Winchesters. The Miroku products are great. I have been very impressed with the Model 1873 saddle ring carbine I got, and the wood went right up to the metal.
No doubt that Winchester makes a fine rifle, they just sort of lost me when they went from USA made to Japanese made. Still, I think the Model 70 featherweight is one of the best looking rifles made.
 

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No doubt that Winchester makes a fine rifle, they just sort of lost me when they went from USA made to Japanese made. Still, I think the Model 70 featherweight is one of the best looking rifles made.
I really don't understand why they had to make their iconic West-winning rifles in Japan. The quality certainly is great, but it's kind of like manufacturing Hatori Hanzo swords in Alaska.
 

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I really don't understand why they had to make their iconic West-winning rifles in Japan. The quality certainly is great, but it's kind of like manufacturing Hatori Hanzo swords in Alaska.
Cheaper labor and materials apparently for the same "quality"? :rolleyes:
Edit. There's a reason pre 1964 Winchester rifles and shotguns are so much more valuable and sought after... even though some were still US made, the feeling is that quality noticably went down after 1965 for Winchester, until it moved some production to Japan.
 

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Cheaper labor and materials apparently for the same "quality"? :rolleyes:
Edit. There's a reason pre 1964 Winchester rifles and shotguns are so much more valuable and sought after... even though some were still US made, the feeling is that quality noticably went down after 1965 for Winchester, until it moved some production to Japan.
Don't think Miroku Japan uses inferior materials at all, and I do believe that labor costs in Japan are close to USA levels.
 

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Don't think Miroku Japan uses inferior materials at all, and I do believe that labor costs in Japan are close to USA levels.
I don't mean "inferior" . I mean cost of materials may be lower in Japan versus the cost of the same materials in the US; at least for manufacturers; in the 1970s that is. Its probably much different now and is why Toyota opened US factories :rolleyes:
 

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I don't mean "inferior" . I mean cost of materials may be lower in Japan versus the cost of the same materials in the US; at least for manufacturers; in the 1970s that is. Its probably much different now and is why Toyota opened US factories :rolleyes:
They're re-opening a steel plant in Pueblo. New foreign owners and scrap sourced from the rust belt.
 

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Cheaper labor and materials apparently for the same "quality"? :rolleyes:
Edit. There's a reason pre 1964 Winchester rifles and shotguns are so much more valuable and sought after... even though some were still US made, the feeling is that quality noticably went down after 1965 for Winchester, until it moved some production to Japan.
I'm not so sure about labor and material costs in Japan, anymore. There has to be a reason why more manufacturing isn't outsourced there.
 

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The cost of labor in Japan is on par with the US.
 
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The cost of labor in Japan is on par with the US.
They are known for great glass.

Back when my uncle worked for General Tire and their quality sucked he called them them the JA Pan manufacturing company.
 

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Yet you get so much higher quality.
I could be wrong, Swags (I often am), but I think that's a cultural thing. Not going into a "Kirkesque" dissertation - just fairly certain it has much to do with ingrained culture of duty, honor and loyalty in Japan.
 
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