Hi-Point Firearms Forums banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
17,727 Posts
Not usually something that I share with the masses, but I think I may have something to add, so here goes.


Welfare... Do I agree with it? No. I believe that everyone should be able to go out and get a job, earn a living, and provide for themselves and their families. In a perfect world right?

Is it a necessary program? Does it serve a purpose? Yes, for those that are either mentally, physically, psychologically *mentally ill* unable to work or the elderly.

Now, saying all that, which is my opinion of welfare, the reality is quite different.

Growing up in Minnesota, my stepfather had a good job and we were very well provided for. However, when I was 9 years old, myself, my twin sister and older brother went to school one day and he was there, when we got home, he was gone and I haven't seen him since. Now, my mother at that time had no marketable skills, no professional education to allow her to get a good job. So, welfare it was. AFDC, or Aid for Families with Dependant Children, was our bread and butter. We got government commodities, as did 90% of the people that lived in the area we did. Personally, I hated the hell out of it, as the "haves" like to look down on the "have nots" and kids are cruel. So, we got food stamps, commodities and $600.00 a month to live on.

Now, while this was going on, my Mom started college to get a degree in Small Business Management, and started a home business, and we got off the system. But trying to raise 3 kids on her own, it was too much for her to do, so it was back on welfare. This was when I was around 12 I think, and so, during the summer, my brother, sister and I all took summer jobs just to help out. Joe worked on the pig farm a mile from the house slopping pigs, I worked at the Dairy right across the street, and Sarah took a job cleaning rooms at the Super 8 Motel that was managed by members of our church. Us kids didn't make much, I was paid $20.00 a week, as was my brother, and Sarah made the most money. Anyway, on Fridays, I'd always get my check, take it to the corner store to cash it and buy myself a pack of baseball cards, my brother a pack of football cards, my mom a candy bar, and my sister an ice cream cone. It was usually less than $3.00 back then, so I still had at least $15.00 or more left over. As soon as I'd pass out the goodies, I always gave the rest of it to my mom to help out with bills. It wasn't anything I had to do, but I did it so it would make it easier on her, and on the rest of us. As a teenager, I always had a job, and I'd always give most of my pay to my mom, because I detested being subject to buying food with food stamps, eating that nasty ass government cheese, and just the general feeling as if I wasn't doing my job to provide for my family. For a man, or even a young boy, it's a pride thing, and my pride really got in the way for me to actually enjoy my teenage years. In High School, I had a full time job and went to school, being that I was home schooled, it was easy to do. Of course, that was back when the minimum wage was $5.00 a hour or less, I don't exactly remember. Since then, I have ALWAYS had a job, and even when times were ROUGH, I refused to do 2 things: 1, I refused to take any government assistance of any kind. 2, I refused to sell my guns, pawn them, whatever just to buy the things I needed. I always went out and found extra work, even mundane odd jobs, just to put food on the table. I've had hard times even when I was running my own business, and it was tough to buy food for my wife and myself. Hell, I'd go from one job for my company, then go to the local Labor Finders just for the work today, pay today check. I'd work 5 hours just to buy a box of cereal and a gallon of milk so my wife could eat breakfast the next day. This was while my wife had a full time job working for Wal-Mart, so it's not like we were lazy and didn't want to work, times were just that hard.

The thing I hate about the welfare system is that it makes people lazy. As long as they can sit on their fat asses watching the boob tube and get paid enough money to pay their rent, utilities and pay for food, what motivation do they have to get off their ass and get a job? What sense of pride does it instill in them or their children, who I guarantee are watching their parents, wondering WTF they are thinking to do nothing with their lives?

Ya know, for years after I moved out of my Moms house and was on my own I resented her for the decisions she made. For putting us on welfare, for the government cheese, for the embarrassment of sending me into the store to pay with foodstamps in front of all of my friends. I resented all of that, even though, at the time, there was nothing else we could have done to survive. As the years have passed, I realized that my Mom did the best she could with what she had to work with and I have blessed her for being such a great Mom, even though it was the hardest thing she's ever had to do. I've talked to her about it, and she has admitted to me that the reason she had us kids go pay with the foodstamps, is because she felt as if she'd failed us by putting us through it. Of course, going through it, I felt the same way but the reality of it was quite different. I also never took into consideration her feelings on it, as she never offered us her opinion, we were left to wonder what exactly it was she was doing and why. Of course, we all were forced to deal with the abandonment of the male figure in our lives, us kids as a father figure, and my Mom, a husband. This whole situation stemmed from that one act, and I've realized that he's the one I should resent for it, and justifiably so. I don't resent him to on one hand, as the reason he left was something that I won't share, as it's something personal that I don't like to talk about, but it was motivated out of guilt. On the other hand, the situation that caused the guilt was something that was totally his fault, and something that I alone have had to live with for years since. Because of that, I'll hate that man forever. I don't know where he is, what he's doing or what he's done with the rest of his life, but I hope beyond hope that he's pushing up daisies for what he did to my family. Is that harsh, or whatever adjective you'd use to describe the feeling? Yep! Do I care? Not in this lifetime, or the next.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
17,727 Posts
Again, it's a pride thing. I have to further thank my Mom for instilling that sense of pride in me at an early age. She always told us that it was tough right then, but it wouldn't always be so.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
17,727 Posts
Not the stuff we got in Minnesota, that stuff tasted like crap and plugged your intestines up for a week!
 

· Registered
Joined
·
17,727 Posts
The free school lunches weren't that bad, as everyone had lunch tickets, and they were all the same. So, no matter if you paid for it or got them free, nobody could tell the difference.

I think the most embarassing thing that ever happened to me during that time was my Mom sending me in the store with foodstamps to pay for some stuff, and my girlfriend walked up behind me in the checkout line. I had to pretend that I'd forgotten something just so she wouldn't see me with that damn coupon book. She asked me about it later, and I didn't say anything but I know she knew what was up.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top