Ford adds armor piercing round stopping power to pursuit-rated Police Interceptor

Discussion in 'Lounge' started by lklawson, Mar 14, 2016.

  1. lklawson

    lklawson Staff Member

    From:
    http://www.gizmag.com/ford-police-interceptor-ballistic-panels/42257/

    Ford adds armor piercing round stopping power to pursuit-rated Police Interceptor
    David Szondy | March 11, 2016

    Getting shot at is, unfortunately, one of the occupational hazards of being a police officer and modern law enforcement vehicles need to keep up with potential threats. In response to police feedback, Ford is now offering optional ballistic panels for its latest Police Interceptor sedan that provide protection against so-called armor-piercing rifle rounds.

    If you watch enough old television cop shows from the 1970s, you've probably seen the police crouching for protection behind their car doors while in a gunfight with the baddies. Since the average production door panel provides about as much protection from a bullet as a tin baking sheet, this is known as "asking for it."

    In real life, pursuit-rated police vehicles in the United States use specially designed panel inserts. These are usually Type III panels that can stop handgun rounds and ammunition up to the equivalent of 7.62 mm x 51 mm NATO M80 ball ammunition and special threat rounds identified by the Los Angeles Police Department.

    The problem is, Type III ballistic plates aren't very effective against high-velocity rifle rounds (often erroneously referred to as armor-piercing bullets). Though the use of such rifles are rare by criminals, Ford says that they are becoming more common and they are a factor in dealing with terrorist incidents. To meet this threat, Ford is offering Type IV panels for the Interceptor, which can stop a .30 caliber armor piercing round with a specified mass of 10.8 g (166 gr) and traveling at 878 m/s ± 9.1 m/s (2,880 ft/s ± 30 ft/s).

    The new Ford ballistic panel is made of a lightweight ceramic with a fabric backing. The idea is that when a high-velocity bullet hits the ceramic, the round shatters and the force is dissipated by the material. Meanwhile, the fabric catches any fragments, preventing them from entering the car cab.

    Introduced in 2015, the Ford Police Interceptor is built along the lines of a 4X4 and sports advanced safety technology with a 75-mph (121 km/h) rear crash test rating, as well as strategically placed crumple zones. Under the bonnet is a 3.7-liter V6 engine generating 304 hp (227 kW) and 378 Nm (279 lb ft) of torque, or the 3.5-liter EcoBoost with an additional 61 hp (45 kW) and 96 Nm (71 lb ft) of torque.

    The move by Ford makes the Police Interceptor the first pursuit-rated vehicle in the US to meet the Department of Justice's (DoJ) National Institute of Justice standard Type IV.

    Not really sure what to think about this one. I get that the 30-06 is considered a "high velocity rifle round," but the .308 isn't? And while the specified 30-06 round is one of the standard loadings, there are a bunch which deliver a lot more energy.

    So, um... what's so special about his armor? "Hey, we used to only stop a middle of the road .308 round, now we stop a lower end 30-06 round!" :rolleyes:

    And is it really becoming more common for criminals and terrorists to shoot at cops with bolt-action deer-rifles?

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2016

  2. Maybe that's why it's optional? Out in Podunk, not too important - east side of Chicago, different story! :rolleyes:
     

  3. ajole

    ajole Supporting Member

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    I think they just did a piss poor job of reporting what is actually going on.

    Some of the confusion:

    "Type III ballistic plates aren't very effective against high-velocity rifle rounds (often erroneously referred to as armor-piercing bullets....)"

    So, the old plates won't stop rifle rounds.

    "To meet this threat, Ford is offering Type IV panels for the Interceptor, which can stop a .30 caliber armor piercing round with a specified mass of 10.8 g (166 gr) and traveling at 878 m/s ± 9.1 m/s (2,880 ft/s ± 30 ft/s)."

    And, one would assume, lesser rounds of the same weight and velocity, but with FMJ, or hunting type expanding bullets.

    So, the new plates stop rifle rounds AND SOME armor piercing rounds.

    See, its not the velocity or weight...it's the construction of the bullet that they are trying to beat.

    The 30-06 vs .308 is meaningless, it's all about armor piercing ammo.
     
  4. lklawson

    lklawson Staff Member

    I hope you're right. That would certainly make more sense. :)

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk
     
  5. ajole

    ajole Supporting Member

    34,524
    10,759
    NE Utah

    It is hard to tell if I am right from that fine bit of expository writing they did.:rolleyes:
     
  6. Screw being libertarian anymore. Give them all tanks. Better yet, make them their POVs. Nothing says, "Big Mac with extra cheese," than an MRAP at the drive-thru. "Sir, we don't have a drive-thru window." "You do now!"
     
  7. FirearmFanatic

    FirearmFanatic "The Enabler!"

    Yeah, but will it stop a "fiddy"? :D
     
  8. FlashBang

    FlashBang I Stand With Talon Lifetime Supporter

    "The new Ford ballistic panel is made of a lightweight ceramic with a fabric backing."

    Thats nothing new... ceramic plates with a "fabric backing" (ie: soft plate) have been around for years.Might be new for Ford to put in the doors at the factory but not new for use.

    .
     
  9. Hansj3

    Hansj3 Supporting Member

    Great, something else for the paramedics I work with to pine over. They already buy Ford ppvs and turn them into supervisor vehicles...
     
  10. ajole

    ajole Supporting Member

    34,524
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    What I can't figure out is the bragging about the engines. I mean...a 300 HP V-6 is a standard 4 door sedan these days, and the Eco-Boost is cool, and adds HP, but...It's an SUV! 0-60 in 6.55 is good for a 6 cylinder SUV, and the AWD sedan did it in 5.85, but a two year old Impala will do it in 5.9. The 2012 Caprice did it in 5.1. Why are they bragging? :confused:
     
  11. FirearmFanatic

    FirearmFanatic "The Enabler!"

    Just found on road dead's way of trying to drum up business! :D
     
  12. MaryB

    MaryB Supporting Member

    V6 interceptor??? :rofl:

     

  13. Yep - with 350 HP they have to be taken seriously. :rolleyes:
     
  14. Under the bonnet, no less. :D
     
  15. lklawson

    lklawson Staff Member

    How else are you going to tempt Rockatansky back?

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk
     
  16. cicpup

    cicpup Resident PITA Supporting Member

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    So in a few years we get to purchase bulletproof cars at Police Auctions? Sounds good to me.
     
  17. FlashBang

    FlashBang I Stand With Talon Lifetime Supporter

    Depending on the department that owned them you can already do that. :)
    Some departments put a ballistic panel inside the drivers door when they prep the vehicle for patrol duties. Not all departments then go to the trouble of removing the panel when the vehicle is retired, it all depends on the department.

    .
     
  18. lklawson

    lklawson Staff Member

    I never really understood the reasoning behind buying a used government vehicle, either police, post office, or whathaveyou. These things have had all the life squeezed from them, right? They been rode hard and are a sway-back old nag by the time they get to us, right?

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk
     
  19. cicpup

    cicpup Resident PITA Supporting Member

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    Other than they're usually built stronger to withstand punishment, they have been stringently maintained. Supervisor/ Detective/ etc. cars are usually babied on top of that. Plus compared to a similar civilian vehicle, they can be found dirt cheap. And old Statie's are damn quick. Only two things that suck about an old cop car are the damage from crap being mounted to the dash and it looks like a cop car.
     
  20. Bull

    Bull Just a Man Supporting Member


    Not always..... The city I work for has a devaluation system in place, when they can't be wrote off any more, they're auctioned off. Now most are pretty well whupped dogs when they get there, but some aren't too bad. Up till a few years ago, city employees had first crack at vehicles, before they went to auction... That has dried up.