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You mean SOS? My Mom used to make that. 馃槪
Dad loved the stuff, had my mom make it all the time it seemed.
I found a recipe for it on allrecipes,com but I add in onions, tastes great on mashed taters.

Just Google Army SOS or Creamed Ground Beef!!!

Sweetie down the street is not only USMC but she's also of German decent. Gonna try to convince her to do some sausages soon. She mentions sauerkraut but the only time I've ever had it was on a hotdog or a Rueben.
 

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I make my own sausage using Hi Mountain Prairie Sage seasoning, and some cheap $1 a pound pork. Might toss in some bacon ends or ham for fat to help it bind better.

That spice has some red pepper in it, a nice kick. Between that and a few splashes of Tapatio, there鈥檚 the perfect bit of heat for a breakfast.

I also do a 鈥渂urrito Maudy鈥 that a now defunct local place in southern Utah did. Eggs, shredded hash browns, and sausage links wrapped in a tortilla, covered with sausage gravy, plus, at the restaurant, your choice of Chile verde or Red Chile sauce. I don鈥檛 bother with that....it鈥檚 all gravy for me.
This one is really good too AC Leggs Pork Sausage Seasoning Blend #10
 
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She also makes potato soup with something called "rivels" (?) in it. Taste like tiny dumplings. She's from PA so may or may not be a German thing, maybe Dutch.
It's "PA Dutch" - i.e. German. Ver gut, ja?
 
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Discussion Starter · #46 ·
She also makes potato soup with something called "rivels" (?) in it. Taste like tiny dumplings. She's from PA so may or may not be a German thing, maybe Dutch.
Here's a recipe for "rivels" which do seem to be a kind of dumpling:
(off site link)

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
 
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Shame on you...you ain't no Hoosier...Fried Taters...gotta be Fried Taters.
Crispy, for sure!!

my folks came from Somerville area... before then, northern Kentucky, Grammaw's parents were a Frenchman and a Fox tribe lady. Grampaw was mostly Irish. His father fled from somewhere back east, to avoid a possible manslaughter charge, which back in those days maybe was the end of a short rope... :eek:
 

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Here's a recipe for "rivels" which do seem to be a kind of dumpling:
(off site link)

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
Sounds exactly how she described making them!!! I sent her the link for her to compare.
 

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Thanks alot Kirk, now I'm gonna have to get busy making some of those. My wife will be all over me. She cleans as she cooks, I wait til all is done to clean up and I'll hear about it.

All joking aside, thanks for the recipe, I'm gonna make some of those for us this weekend.
 
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Just wanted to mention...the air fryer does an excellent job of "frying" biscuits with a slightly crunchy surface.

It's "PA Dutch" - i.e. German. Ver gut, ja?
Nope. Dutch, like Dubar said. PA Dutch is not German. As are rivels....not German. If it were German, it would be "sehr gut, ja." :ROFLMAO:

German is Spaetzle, which is either drops like rivels, or longer thinner shapes like regular noodles. Better cooks can make them thinner, or lighter in texture by using different techniques to get a shape and get it into the water.

Often cooked in the broth that a hunk of meat was cooked in, but not really IN the soup or gravy. But then often served topped with gravy.



 

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Just wanted to mention...the air fryer does an excellent job of "frying" biscuits with a slightly crunchy surface.



Nope. Dutch, like Dubar said. PA Dutch is not German. As are rivels....not German. If it were German, it would be "sehr gut, ja." :ROFLMAO:

German is Spaetzle, which is either drops like rivels, or longer thinner shapes like regular noodles. Better cooks can make them thinner, or lighter in texture by using different techniques to get a shape and get it into the water.

Often cooked in the broth that a hunk of meat was cooked in, but not really IN the soup or gravy. But then often served topped with gravy.
I won't argue the origin of the food BUT I am PA Deutsch - mispronounced Dutch. We are from Germany, not Holland (Netherlands, if you want to be technical). Grandma was a von Dreau and made rivels .... a lot. Always with potatoes, never with meat. We'll just agree to disagree on this one.
 
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I won't argue the origin of the food BUT I am PA Deutsch - mispronounced Dutch. We are from Germany, not Holland (Netherlands, if you want to be technical). Grandma was a von Dreau and made rivels .... a lot. Always with potatoes, never with meat. We'll just agree to disagree on this one.
I'm with u Dawg...
Mr Know It All, don't ;)
 

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I won't argue the origin of the food BUT I am PA Deutsch - mispronounced Dutch. We are from Germany, not Holland (Netherlands, if you want to be technical). Grandma was a von Dreau and made rivels .... a lot. Always with potatoes, never with meat. We'll just agree to disagree on this one.
We don鈥檛 have to disagree. Germany didn鈥檛 even exist when most of the various Deutsch groups came over. And then a lot came over as it was being created, trying to escape the wars and religious persecution.

So, what part of Germany? I鈥檝e been from Switzerland to the North Sea, the former East to Luxembourg, lived there 4 years, my wife IS German...and we鈥檝e never heard of rivels. Only Spaetzle. Maybe it鈥檚 an adaptation they made once they got here? Maybe it鈥檚 a colloquial term from the place they were escaping, that got wiped out in Germany and so is not used?

Funny thing...as I am looking online, EVERYTHING points at Amish and PA, they might CALL it German...but I can鈥檛 find much in German about it....except two really funny things.

One is a German article about it....and they call it a Holland soup from Pennsylvania. 鈥淓ine authentische holl盲ndische Suppe aus Pennsylvania鈥
So maybe I was right?

Another says it鈥檚 not rivel at all....it鈥檚 Riebelesuppe. Like I suspected...rivel an Americanized word. Riebele means Rubbed, essentially.
But I still can鈥檛 find what part of Germany that name is used in. The soup is, however, different from Spaetzle, which is more of a side dish. Your rivel soup seems to be more of an actual soup. I mean...imagine that! Calling a soup....soup!

Edit...it appears to be Swabisch...SOUTHERN Germany, not Holland. And it鈥檚 a colloquial name...

A lot of PA Dutch came from the Rhineland Palatinate, south-central western area, around Mainz, which is, funny thing.....the state where my wife lived her whole life prior to coming here. Very much a German area....now. The soil there is a rich dark red...they say it鈥檚 from all the blood that鈥檚 been spilled there as different groups moved through, took power, or lost power.

But again....not all of them did. Sounds like some came from the south.
 

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@ajole - very interesting. My family is originally from the Rhineland Palatinate - about 30 years before the Revolution here. Live and learn. Too far removed from my roots, maybe - never heard of Riebelesuppe - but that's interesting too
Either way its yummy stuff.
You betcha!
 

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@ajole - very interesting. My family is originally from the Rhineland Palatinate - about 30 years before the Revolution here. Live and learn. Too far removed from my roots, maybe - never heard of Riebelesuppe - but that's interesting too

You betcha!
Hey! That鈥檚 pretty cool. I may have driven by their old farms. If this Covid stuff ever cools down, you should go visit the place. My brother was all set to visit the part of Norway we come from...but that trip got shut down. Sad.

More funny word stuff.

There鈥檚 a soup called Kesselsuppe. Basically translates as 鈥渒ettle soup鈥. It sometimes has 鈥淩iweli鈥 in it. Which of course is pronounce 鈥淩iveli鈥. Which sounds Italian...which is logical for Southern Germany. But they are made by 鈥淩eiben鈥 the pasta dough with your fingers until you have little crumbly bits, then tossing them in the soup. Crazy how words work.

My wife knows about Kesselsuppe, which is a clear broth soup, but they just called the 鈥渘oodles鈥 Spaetzle.

Gotta love history and how things can change, or not change, depending on what groups are where.
 

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Hey! That鈥檚 pretty cool. I may have driven by their old farms. If this Covid stuff ever cools down, you should go visit the place. My brother was all set to visit the part of Norway we come from...but that trip got shut down. Sad.

More funny word stuff.

There鈥檚 a soup called Kesselsuppe. Basically translates as 鈥渒ettle soup鈥. It sometimes has 鈥淩iweli鈥 in it. Which of course is pronounce 鈥淩iveli鈥. Which sounds Italian...which is logical for Southern Germany. But they are made by 鈥淩eiben鈥 the pasta dough with your fingers until you have little crumbly bits, then tossing them in the soup. Crazy how words work.

My wife knows about Kesselsuppe, which is a clear broth soup, but they just called the 鈥渘oodles鈥 Spaetzle.

Gotta love history and how things can change, or not change, depending on what groups are where.
I also find it interesting that certain things - legends if you will - become gospel truth, so even written into the history books. Germany, Netherlands (my wife's family actually is Dutch from Zeeland), Scotland and Wales are on the list. I understand that parts of Germany are much like my area of PA. With my luck, the German government will have paperwork showing I own 200 years of back taxes!
 
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My grandparents family came over from the Austria/German border area in the mid 1800's and they never made this... potatoes for every meal...
 

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My grandparents family came over from the Austria/German border area in the mid 1800's and they never made this... potatoes for every meal...
Well, that makes sense....Austrian Germans are different from other Germans. Just ask a German.

But then, EVERY part of Germany thinks that of every other part.;)
Some of them can't even understand each other's version of daily spoken German.
 
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