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How can you keep gas long term? I know about sta-bil, but I mean the REAL long term
 

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You really can't keep it for the really long term. You can use Sta-bil for a while, but you should be rotating your stocks. Gasoline will break down and lose combustion efficiency.
 

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Your best bet for the longest storage would probably be glass containers, glass won't contribute to it breaking down. Metal will hold it longer than plastic, but it will still get lacquery pretty quick.
 

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Your best bet for the longest storage would probably be glass containers, glass won't contribute to it breaking down. Metal will hold it longer than plastic, but it will still get lacquery pretty quick.
Need to be really careful with glass due to possible static build-up.
 

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GAS STORAGE IN GLASS CONTAINERS???

:cantlook: :cantlook: :cantlook: :devilsidesmile: :devilsidesmile: :devilsidesmile: :wideeyed: :wideeyed2: :wideeyed: :rip:

Well, there's a five-gallon incendiary device waiting to happen! BIG Molotov cocktail, anyone?

gtv is right on! The risk of static electrical buildup/discharge and a possible discharge make glass containers a bad idea for long-term gasoline storage! Now, if you were just using a glass container as, say, a funnel or to decant small quantities of the flammable hydrocarbons that gasoline is made up of from a larger container to a smaller container or engine (like a two-stroke engine on a yard appliance like a leaf blower, chain saw, weedwacker, lawn mower, etc.) for SHORT-TERM use, then I could probably say that the risk of a large static discharge would be negligible enough to justify the use of a glass container in such a way. But for the long term, it is a bad idea!

A few notes here on static buildup:

Static electricity takes time to buildup in a material object, like a glass container, UNLESS mechanical forces help to accelerate the buildup of the charge (I believe electromagnetic induction can also cause a static buildup...chime in here to help me confirm, folks!). So, having a flammable substance stored in a container that holds a static charge over time is generally a BAD idea!

Static electricity is hampered by humid conditions in the atmosphere, so wet, hot air will tend to disappate static charges very readily. Dry, cool air, like winter climatic conditions, tends to accelerate static buildups, and when a electrical conductor comes near enough to an object to conduct a static charge, it can create a spark. If one of the objects involved contains combustible materials or ingredients, then this situation could very well end in a BOOM!

Objects that can hold static charges, including the human body, should be grounded to the earth to help dissapate any excess electrical buildup. Doing so could even prevent an accidental explosion around areas like fuel depots, gas stations, and armories (the last one in this list is used in the understood context of a designated storage area for weapons and ammunition, NOT as some sort of derogatory term...I'll explain later...).

Here's a good article on the basics of static electricity:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Static_electricity

Well, gotta dash. Take care, everyone!

Jag 8)
 

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GAS STORAGE IN GLASS CONTAINERS???
Jag freezes it for storage. ;)

(sorry, who can resist an Alaska joke?)

good thots on the dangers, better to walk that build incendiary problems.
 

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That's funny, I'm a fuels specialist for the USAF but I've got nothing to add... Thanks for stealing my thunder Jag.... LOL!


Actually, the colder it gets the worse it is for storing gasoline. At -40 to 20 degrees F, the vapor pressure put off by mogas *motor gasoline, or unleaded* is enough that ANY spark will set it off and explode the tank. You have to take into consideration the volitility of the fuel, or the ease of which the fuel converts from a liquid to a vapor, and unleaded gasoline puts off 10 - 15 PSI.

Vapor pressure is defined as the outward pressure generated by the vapors at a certain temprature. Vapor pressure referred to in specs for fuel products is the pressure exerted in PSI at 100 degrees F in a closed container by the Reid method.

MUR 10-15 PSI
Diesel *DS2* 0 PSI
JP-8 Jet fuel 0-3 PSI

According to the above list, you can see that the vapor pressure of gasoline ranges from 10 - 15 psi, depending on ambient temprature. This means that it creates pressure above it's surface in a closed container. At this point the vapor/air mixture within the tank is too rich to burn; however, at the tank vents, gauging hatch, etc. where the vapors can escape there is a flammable mixture. In this situation a fire could start at the tank shell, but is unlikely to enter the tank. However, when the fuel liquid temprature is between -40 to 20 degrees F you have a very different story. Between these tempratures gasoline is within the explosive range and the whole tank becomes a bomb.


Any other questions, let me know. :)
 
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