Got a new blonde in my life

Discussion in 'Vintage Topic Archive (Sept - 2009)' started by doktor, May 15, 2008.

  1. doktor

    doktor Guest

    I wasn't looking to cheat, she just whispered, "take me home."
    Is it true blonde's have more fun???
    Won her on Gunbroker


    Doc


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    [​IMG]
     
  2. Looks pretty sweet. Is that a muzzle loader?
     

  3. doktor

    doktor Guest

    Yes, percussion .45 caliber, I have 2 other "primitive" type rifles, both flintlocks, and both .50 caliber. In addition, I have 6 inline rifles. I really got the "fever" with my first smokepole, and the rest were a result of getting better "firepower" fever.


    Doc
     
  4. doktor

    doktor Guest

    error, sorry
    doc
     
  5. Yep, percussion cap muzzle loader.

    .50 cal?

    Sorry, late post :oops:
     
  6. Very nice!! I like the old smoke poles. I don't have any BP long guns but I shoot my remmy on a semi regular basis.
     
  7. Ive always meant to get a BP barrel for my Mossberg 500 but never have.
     
  8. sweet piece man. I have a .45 cal TC hawken rifle.
     
  9. Ari

    Ari Guest

    Man that is cool I have been thinking about that very weapon as of late. I think the Kentucky Long rifle is one of the prettiest rifles made. My Father in law built one before he passed. But my brother in law who is not a shooter got it. Heck the old man did not even like his son but we were friends and it would have meant more to me. But I have have been thinking about getting one ever since.

    Congrats!
     
  10. i have 2 pistols. haven't had the pleasure of a rifle yet. she looks good...:)
     
  11. doktor,

    Nice looking blonde you got there, and in a sweet flat shooting caliber to boot.

    If you, or anyone else, comes across a .36 or .40 caliber long rifle at a decent price shoot me a pm ASAP. I need me a one gun for everything hunting rifle and a .36 or .40 would be ideal for me.
     
  12. DrpChvy

    DrpChvy Member

    Dont know much about the gun but it looks like something that is gonna be fun to shoot!
     
  13. doktor

    doktor Guest

    http://www.blackpowdermag.com/featured-articles/ultra-high-speed-flintlock-movie.php


    There are a couple of fun video's on this page for anyone that has not had the unique pleasure of shooting a blackpowder rifle. These are of several flintlocks, "Blondie" is what we call a caplock, it uses basically the same type ignition as our centerfire weapons with the very unique difference being the spark has to travel through the nipple. The first traditional muzzleloader I owned was a right handed flintlock, as you watch the videos, imagine that ignition taking place directly in front of your eye, as I am left-handed, flinch-lock is what I and others have called them.


    Doc
     
  14. I have a .44 cal Civil War replica BP revolver that I bought out of impulse, never have fired it yet. Its the brass frame Colt navy "Confederate" , cheap Italian job.

    I had one years ago and it was kind of messy to clean up after.

    Are there any new powders that are easier to clean up?
     
  15. Ari

    Ari Guest

    doktor those videos were fun to watch.
     
  16. neothespian

    neothespian Member

    4,578
    0
    I've always been interested in the art of "primitive" arms. Then again, anything to improve my shooting ability I'm all for. That and there's somethign to be said about the simple physics and chemistry of such a thing.
     

  17. If you want easy cleanup then I suggest selling the cap-n-ball pistol and sticking with modern guns. Cleanup is part of the nostalgia of owning and shooting black powder era firearms.

    P.S. This is why I get some really good deals on black powder guns... :)
     
  18. Point taken, I guess I will just have to get used to cleaning it, aint gonna sell it, who knows, it may come in handy some day LOL

    The ultimate TEOTWAWKI weapon

    You can make the bullets and even make the gunpowder if you have to.

    The caps may be a problem though

    I wonder if I could change it over to a flintlock revolver hehehe
     
  19. doktor

    doktor Guest

    There are a couple of newer black powder substitutes that are extremely easy to clean, one is called, 777, another is American Pioneer, they both clean up very easily. But as any one that shoots smokepoles will tell you, just because it cleans up easily, doesn't mean it can wait to be cleaned. If you delay very long, especially with Pyrodex, the barrel can suffer irreparable damage. I have an inline that was completely ruined by it having been left uncleaned, after being fired with Pyrodex, the substitutes are very corrosive and must be thoroughly removed.
    There are a few cases where regular black powder has been left in rifles for over 50 years with absolutely no damage, however, I would not suggest that you try this on your own.


    In reality, cleaning real black powder is actually easier than some of the smokeless powders, as long as you do your part, clean it absolutely at the first possible time. Just make sure Momma is not at home when you are using her bathtub, or kitchen sink. I will usually keep a bottle of windshield washer fluid in the truck, and run a couple of patches soaked with it down through the barrel after I finish shooting, before I leave the range, making thorough cleaning at home significantly easier.
    If you are willing to do your maintenance, you will never have to replace your barrel, and there are black powder rifles that are 200 years old that can still be used, and with some of the newer high powered rifles, you may have to replace at7-10,000 rounds.
    The other thing that makes it more fun, is the fact that you are doing it the same way that Daniel Boone, Jeff Bridger, Lewis and Clark, etc, did it 200-300 years ago, they saw the same puff of smoke rise up out of that barrel, that you can, this country was won under the aromatic smell of sulphur, the west was won by pioneers that saw that spark from a flint-lock propel a round ball as big around as your thumb smack into the side of a buffalo, and drop it right where it was hit. It can be hard to find real black powder, but the newer substitutes, don't give out that "smoke" that earned those rifles their nickname.
    There are often excellent deals available on some of the auctions sites, Blondie was won at a $125.99 price, because of a small knick in the stock, for my purposes, it will definitely be a shooter, and I really didn't think of it as a nick, but more as a "character" mark. There are much higher priced muzzle loaders, you can easily top hundreds of thousands of dollars, for a one of a kind, hand built, custom, but if you are willing to put a little work into it, there are kits available that will save you hundreds of dollars, that are fairly easy to finish, or you can try it the way the pioneers did it, get the lock, trigger, barrel, and find a piece of wood that has your stock hidden away inside it, it all depends on you and how much work you are willing to do to get it together. Many of the kits are just a matter of finishing the stock, and drilling the holes for the hardware.
    These folks have the the gamut, fully finished to a stick and hardware, reasonably priced finished, and extremely high dollar custom made, one of a kind, rifles, pistols, and shotguns.
    http://www.trackofthewolf.com/(S(cxh1ya55xetpgtrw1vtqwxel))/index.aspx



    Doc
     
  20. doktor

    doktor Guest

    There are a couple of newer black powder substitutes that are extremely easy to clean, one is called, 777, another is American Pioneer, they both clean up very easily. But as any one that shoots smokepoles will tell you, just because it cleans up easily, doesn't mean it can wait to be cleaned. If you delay very long, especially with Pyrodex, the barrel can suffer irreparable damage. I have an inline that was completely ruined by it having been left uncleaned, after being fired with Pyrodex, the substitutes are very corrosive and must be thoroughly removed.
    There are a few cases where regular black powder has been left in rifles for over 50 years with absolutely no damage, however, I would not suggest that you try this on your own.


    In reality, cleaning real black powder is actually easier than some of the smokeless powders, as long as you do your part, clean it absolutely at the first possible time. Just make sure Momma is not at home when you are using her bathtub, or kitchen sink. I will usually keep a bottle of windshield washer fluid in the truck, and run a couple of patches soaked with it down through the barrel after I finish shooting, before I leave the range, making thorough cleaning at home significantly easier.
    If you are willing to do your maintenance, you will never have to replace your barrel, and there are black powder rifles that are 200 years old that can still be used, and with some of the newer high powered rifles, you may have to replace at7-10,000 rounds.
    The other thing that makes it more fun, is the fact that you are doing it the same way that Daniel Boone, Jeff Bridger, Lewis and Clark, etc, did it 200-300 years ago, they saw the same puff of smoke rise up out of that barrel, that you can, this country was won under the aromatic smell of sulphur, the west was won by pioneers that saw that spark from a flint-lock propel a round ball as big around as your thumb smack into the side of a buffalo, and drop it right where it was hit. It can be hard to find real black powder, but the newer substitutes, don't give out that "smoke" that earned those rifles their nickname.
    There are often excellent deals available on some of the auctions sites, Blondie was won at a $125.99 price, because of a small knick in the stock, for my purposes, it will definitely be a shooter, and I really didn't think of it as a nick, but more as a "character" mark. There are much higher priced muzzle loaders, you can easily top hundreds of thousands of dollars, for a one of a kind, hand built, custom, but if you are willing to put a little work into it, there are kits available that will save you hundreds of dollars, that are fairly easy to finish, or you can try it the way the pioneers did it, get the lock, trigger, barrel, and find a piece of wood that has your stock hidden away inside it, it all depends on you and how much work you are willing to do to get it together. Many of the kits are just a matter of finishing the stock, and drilling the holes for the hardware.
    These folks have the the gamut, fully finished to a stick and hardware, reasonably priced finished, and extremely high dollar custom made, one of a kind, rifles, pistols, and shotguns.
    http://www.trackofthewolf.com/(S(cxh1ya55xetpgtrw1vtqwxel))/index.aspx



    Doc