Hi-Point Firearms Forums banner

1 - 20 of 84 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
28,370 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Decided to try my hand at hoe cakes this morning. sometimes called Skillet cakes or flat iron cakes or any number of things. Basically just sweetened and unleavened corn meal. the oldest recipes don't call for any sort of sweetener or binder but I added sugar and eggs to bind mine.

So far so good.

Peace favor your sword (mobile)
 
  • Like
Reactions: Rerun

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,238 Posts
Decided to try my hand at hoe cakes this morning. sometimes called Skillet cakes or flat iron cakes or any number of things. Basically just sweetened and unleavened corn meal. the oldest recipes don't call for any sort of sweetener or binder but I added sugar and eggs to bind mine.

So far so good.

Peace favor your sword (mobile)
If you get a chance, maybe you could post the recipes and procedures you found to have been most successful. I'm sure I'm not the only one who would be curious enough to try it out without having to reinvent the wheel.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
28,370 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
If you get a chance, maybe you could post the recipes and procedures you found to have been most successful. I'm sure I'm not the only one who would be curious enough to try it out without having to reinvent the wheel.
I only tried one so far. But I'll probably experiment more over time.

Peace favor your sword (mobile)
 
  • Like
Reactions: Think1st

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,238 Posts
The title of this thread had me expecting something, err, different.
He originally spelled it "How" Cakes, and I thought he'd done so to avoid the interpretation you just applied.

I once read that they were called hoe cakes because people of lesser means would actually cook them over a fire on the blade of a hoe.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
28,370 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
He originally spelled it "How" Cakes, and I thought he'd done so to avoid the interpretation you just applied.
fat fingered

I once read that they were called hoe cakes because people of lesser means would actually cook them over a fire on the blade of a hoe.
apparently, the historians at Mount Vernon say that the term comes from the fact that one of the griddles used to cook them was shaped like the blade of a hoe but it wasn't actually a hoe blade.

Peace favor your sword (mobile)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,771 Posts
My dad used to make what we called cornbread in a skillet using bacon grease. I think the real name is cornpone, very easy to make. Went real good with large-mouth bass.

Recipe calls for:

4 cups ground white or yellow cornmeal
1 Tbsp salt
2 or 3 cups of very hot water (not boiling)
1/2 or more of bacon grease, tends to soak into the meal. I think this is where I got the recipe, sounds just like what my dad used:


Cooking instructions should be there too.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
28,370 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
My dad used to make what we called cornbread in a skillet using bacon grease. I think the real name is cornpone, very easy to make. Went real good with large-mouth bass.

Recipe calls for:

4 cups ground white or yellow cornmeal
1 Tbsp salt
2 or 3 cups of very hot water (not boiling)
1/2 or more of bacon grease, tends to soak into the meal. I think this is where I got the recipe, sounds just like what my dad used:


Cooking instructions should be there too.
yeah, that's very similar to the older recipes that I found, such as the Mount Vernon recipe. It used the same basic ingredient list but instead of bacon grease it was lard also included Cayenne pepper.

Peace favor your sword (mobile)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,197 Posts
Hoe Cakes used to be a staple around these parts. @Think1st got it right when he said how they got their name. Servant would cook them on the blade of their home.

Hoe cakes are nothing more than cornmeal and water made into a dough and cooked in grease. Start adding sugar, nutmeg, cinnamon, milk, eggs, or anything else, they become Johnny Cakes.

Actually I believe Johnny cakes are the original having to do with the Pilgrims and Squanto. Dont know where the "Johnny" came from. I always figured from Johnny Reb as they were a staple of the Confederate army. Anyways, Johnny Cakes as I know them are more than just cornmeal and water.

When I was younger they were somewhat common, as the older people of color began passing, the seemed to pretty much slide off into oblivion. Today it's hard to even find someone who knows what they are.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
28,370 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Hoe Cakes used to be a staple around these parts. @Think1st got it right when he said how they got their name. Servant would cook them on the blade of their home.

Hoe cakes are nothing more than cornmeal and water made into a dough and cooked in grease. Start adding sugar, nutmeg, cinnamon, milk, eggs, or anything else, they become Johnny Cakes.

Actually I believe Johnny cakes are the original having to do with the Pilgrims and Squanto. Dont know where the "Johnny" came from. I always figured from Johnny Reb as they were a staple of the Confederate army. Anyways, Johnny Cakes as I know them are more than just cornmeal and water.

When I was younger they were somewhat common, as the older people of color began passing, the seemed to pretty much slide off into oblivion. Today it's hard to even find someone who knows what they are.
I was making them for breakfast for my family. I wanted them sweets so I added sugar and cinnamon. I didn't have faith that they would stick together well so some of the newer recipes call for eggs as a binder and I added those I'll probably try the Mount Vernon recipe soon.

Peace favor your sword (mobile)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
35,668 Posts
Just remember, they were using a more finely ground corn, more toward a corn flour than a meal. Sometimes you can get “white corn meal” that is more finely ground. Might be more traditional. If you have a grinder, you might be able to make your corn meal into a finer flour.

Masa is probably too fine, and definitely completely different, being nixtamalized.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
28,370 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Just remember, they were using a more finely ground corn, more toward a corn flour than a meal. Sometimes you can get "white corn meal" that is more finely ground. Might be more traditional. If you have a grinder, you might be able to make your corn meal into a finer flour.

Masa is probably too fine, and definitely completely different, being nixtamalized.
I have a coffee grinder that my daughter has used to flower rice in the past. That would probably do.

Peace favor your sword (mobile)
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
28,370 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Two nights in a row, I made white-flower "flat bread." Basically, just water and flower, fried in a skillet. 6-8" dia.

I'm not happy with how they're turning out. I've made them fairly thin, pancake batter or thinner, then fry them brown on each side, but they still seem just a tad doghy in the middle.

I may have to try a different recipe.

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,197 Posts
Two nights in a row, I made white-flower "flat bread." Basically, just water and flower, fried in a skillet. 6-8" dia.

I'm not happy with how they're turning out. I've made them fairly thin, pancake batter or thinner, then fry them brown on each side, but they still seem just a tad doghy in the middle.

I may have to try a different recipe.

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
Bannock, or fry bread, is a breakfast staple for me when camping. I mix flour, baking powder, and a pinch of salt in a ziplock bag. Mix it with water to make the dough the consistency of play dough. Flatten it out until it’s maybe 1/2 inch thick, maybe a bit less. Fry in oil and serve hot with a little bit of honey. I hot cup of black coffee rounds out the meal. Good!

Fry it slow. A hot skillet will burn the outside and leave the middle doughy.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
35,668 Posts
Two nights in a row, I made white-flower "flat bread." Basically, just water and flower, fried in a skillet. 6-8" dia.

I'm not happy with how they're turning out. I've made them fairly thin, pancake batter or thinner, then fry them brown on each side, but they still seem just a tad doghy in the middle.

I may have to try a different recipe.

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
You just need to turn the heat down, and maybe use a lid.
Sounds like you’re making fat tortillas with no lard.
 
  • Like
Reactions: lklawson

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
28,370 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Bannock, or fry bread, is a breakfast staple for me when camping. I mix flour, baking powder, and a pinch of salt in a ziplock bag. Mix it with water to make the dough the consistency of play dough. Flatten it out until it’s maybe 1/2 inch thick, maybe a bit less. Fry in oil and serve hot with a little bit of honey. I hot cup of black coffee rounds out the meal. Good!

Fry it slow. A hot skillet will burn the outside and leave the middle doughy.
I think this is where I want to go. I have been using a high water content recipe. Basically making a slurry and frying that. It pours out like thin pankcake batter, which gets me the desired thickness but I think too much water makes it harder to cook through in the center. Next try, I'll probably just mix it up and pound it flat.

You just need to turn the heat down, and maybe use a lid.
Sounds like you’re making fat tortillas with no lard.
Basically, that was sort of the goal. A lid and a lower temp with a longer cook time might work better. I think my issue is just too much water. Instead of a "batter" I think I'll try a dough next time. It'll be a little more work but I think I might like the results better.

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
 
  • Like
Reactions: ajole

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,483 Posts
How do these cakes differ from Hushpuppies?

Inquiring eldar
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
24,380 Posts
How do these cakes differ from Hushpuppies?

Inquiring eldar
Structurally? As different as a pancake age hush puppy can be.

Organizationally? Hush puppies contain eggs, liquid (milk or water), baking powder, corn meal, and flour. Hoe cakes are flour, cut in lard or shortening, and liquid (milk or water).
 
1 - 20 of 84 Posts
Top