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I went out shooting, trying to sight in my gun better. I ran three different type of bullets, or should I say brand names.
180 gr cci metal jacket Walmart Cheap
180 gr remington, same thing as Walmart except for brand
165 gr hollow point reloads, unique powder, rem jacketed hp bullet, X.X gr of powder. Multiple manufacturers of brass.

The 180 gr went through nicely, in fact never had a tighter group at 15 yards. The CCI were a little better than the Remington.
But when I shot the reloads they seem to drop like rocks. Every shot was about 8 to 10 inches lower, except one. They all went into a fairly nice grouping, about 1.5 inches apart, but just low. Is this common. I have a Hi Point 40 S&W. The CCI were a very nice group, a little over an inch apart in about a 3 inch circle. Never shot this good at this distance before. But it bothers me about the reloads, I did not reload these, someone else did, bought them at a flea market. Talked to the guy and he says it is my gun. Any thoughts out there.

***Edited by Strangerous to remove the powder charge weight.
 
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Based on my limited experience with the 40 S&W, I've had better accuracy with the 180 gr loads. However, guns are like cars - your mileage may vary. A particular gun (any brand, caliber) will shoot best with a particular load. It takes lots of range time, shooting different brands, bullet styles, bullet weights to find that "magic load".

Regarding the handloads: If you didn't load them yourself or had them loaded by someone you trust, you should not shoot them - period! Commercially remanufactered ammunition should be ok. When in doubt, shoot brand new ammo only. The life you save may be your own. :wink:
 

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IMHO, The guy sounds like a gun snob.
Of course it isn't my ammo that's bad. It has to be that POS HiPoint. It doesn't matter that the commercial ammo shot flawlessly. That HiPoint made my reloads drop so much.
I'm not too familiar with with reloading, but it sounds like he might not have put the right amount of powder in them. Not sure if you know the guy personally or not, but I'm thinking he might be a tad on the shady side. He could be trying to cut costs by not loading them hot enough, and then selling them under the guise of being correct, i.e. he uses less powder in the round than what he is advertising. How is he gonna get caught unless someone pulls the bullets and measures the powder on all the rounds?
 
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You're lucky he didn't accidently double-charge the cases! Depending upon the powder, it's easy to do if a person is careless. I only buy factory ammo at gun shows. If you aren't sure, look at the primers.

Broomhead's right about the guy being a gun snob. They're everywhere!

:wall:
 
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Even if you knew the wieght of the charge you still have to know what type of powder was used.

A 15 grain lighter bullet of a completely different design with an unknown type of powder....changes in that range would be expected I should think.

If you were planning on continuing it's use obviously the best thing to do is adjust the sights...you stated groups were good


Personally I wouldn't want to use someone elses handloads unless I had a high level of confidence in the persons skills
 

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A different weight of bullet is going to have a different point of impact, That, and the fact that a lighter bullet is going to have a longer trajectory. While the heavier bullets were impacting higher, they're closer to the top of their trajectory at that distance than the lighter bullet fired from the same gun.

A slower load will impact higher for two reasons:

#1: The dwell time of the bullet in the gun is longer on a slower load, which results in more muzzle flip of the gun before the bullet leaves the barrel.

#2: A slower load will have a shorter trajectory as stated earlier, which is reaching the top of the trajectory curve sooner.

A fair comparison of those flea market loads would be with other ammo with the same weight bullet. Since you didn't mention that the flea market loads jammed your gun or blow it up, you might want to do a fair comparison with the similar weight bullets before confronting the flea market man. He may know more about reloading than all of us put together. ;)


However, it IS true to say that reloads are like underwear--be careful who you swap with.


wizard93
 
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All good points.....don't forget the primers, old powder, wet powder, bullet weight, cartage pressure, bullet seat.....The reason that I don't use reloads.

I have a Colt 1911 Series 80 Combat Government Model that will not eat reloads, due to the expansion of the brass. In all my Hi Points: 45. 40, 9, and 380 they work fine with factory ammo.

Once when I was a police officer in NC I had the misfortune put a poor dog out of its misery after being hit by a car. I didn't want to use my factory ammo so I loaded a 357 round that one of my buddies loaded......

I have fired my SW Model 29, 44 Mag many times but the kick that hand reload had was ungodly! I thought that the cylinder had come from together. it shot a flame about two feet out of the barrel and in a one foot arc from the from of the cylinder. The round was so hot that it cut the back strap.

Good luck with reloads!
 

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All good points.....don't forget the primers, old powder, wet powder, bullet weight, cartage pressure, bullet seat.....The reason that I don't use reloads.

I have a Colt 1911 Series 80 Combat Government Model that will not eat reloads, due to the expansion of the brass. In all my Hi Points: 45. 40, 9, and 380 they work fine with factory ammo.

Once when I was a police officer in NC I had the misfortune put a poor dog out of its misery after being hit by a car. I didn't want to use my factory ammo so I loaded a 357 round that one of my buddies loaded......

I have fired my SW Model 29, 44 Mag many times but the kick that hand reload had was ungodly! I thought that the cylinder had come from together. it shot a flame about two feet out of the barrel and in a one foot arc from the from of the cylinder. The round was so hot that it cut the back strap.

Good luck with reloads!
youre awful lucky that you still got your hand pard...... I dont shoot anything that anyone else has loaded....even if I know them
 
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it sounds like the reloads were light loads or they were not crimped tight. I have to put a "factory type " crimp on my 45 reloads or my hi point and colt will not function correctly and groups are atrocious.
 
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Thorn 242, you are so right, I am lucky that I didn't lose my hand or any other functional body part.

That is the reason that I don't do reloads unless I load them my self.

That and the fact if I do have a major malfunction caused by the ammo: Factory loaded can be covered by the manufacturer, but if I damage my weapon with hand loads I have no one to blame but myself.

My dad is a retired Master Warrant Officer (CW-5) and he is the most anal human in the world, he uses all the tables, writes down every thing, and uses a chronograph on each round, and I still don't get a warm fuzzy feeling using reloads. He does turn out some of the most accurate rounds though.

Don't get me wrong, some of the best ammo is hand loaded, right down to the primer, powder, bullet weight, seating, forming, and tumbling.

Just be careful!
 

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But it bothers me about the reloads, I did not reload these, someone else did, bought them at a flea market. Talked to the guy and he says it is my gun. Any thoughts out there.

***Edited by Strangerous to remove the powder charge weight.
Part of reloading is perfecting a round which works well in a specific fire arm. That round may use a slower burning powder which works well with a longer barrel; say 4"-6", or longer. The type of rifling can also make a difference in pressure as can barrel tolerances. If your gun has a 3.5" barrel, its velocity will likely be lower than expected, especially if the load is already light - which is likely given that it was a reload for sale.

Also, don't forget that some bullets differ in quality. Some bullets tend to tumble more than others. Bullets that tumble rather than spiral will have much higher drag and corresponding drop. The amount of tumbling (the cause of key-holing) can differ from barrel to barrel. To be fair, it is half true to say it's your gun. That doesn't mean it's a bad thing. It just means that load doesn't compliment your weapon. To be completely fair, it's likely it's half the gun and half the reload. Some ammo just doesn't work well in some guns. Some reloads don't work well in some guns. Your best bet is to simply not buy his medioker/marginal ammo. If you find you must point a finger, point it squarely at the reload as you know it works well with other factory loads.

Also, don't forget when you shoot someone else's reload, you are accepting additional liability for potential injuries to others. Should he double charge a round and your gun go boom, injuring others near you, your financial future can be drastically different than if you had strictly stuck with commercial loads.
 
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