how crafty are you?

Discussion in 'Survival Zone' started by Hansj3, Feb 16, 2016.

  1. Hansj3

    Hansj3 Supporting Member

    let me start off by saying I'm a mechanic by trade. It's hard to go home after a 10 hour shift of staring at cars to stare at another car. for the past 3 weeks the top of my radiator where the end cap seals to the radiator core has had a leak at the rubber o-ring. it will never blow the engine but it steams, and it is a point of pride for me. it annoys the hell out of me.but radiators are expensive and even though it was 30 degrees today by the time I got one shipped to me it would be 15 below. so as I was sitting at a stoplight watching my engine steam, a thought occurred to me:

    in TV shows like The Walking Dead or zombie movies there is almost always a scene where after the group gets away the car breaks down it is a bunch of steam coming out of the engine and the group has to walk. now if it was a long term survival situation you could really need that car and a busted radiator seems like a really petty reason to not have that car. so as I was waiting for the light to turn green a thought popped in my head. with limited tools and supplies could you build a radiator.

    I know how I'd do it but how would you guys?

    it doesn't even have to be a zombie situation what if you were out in the sticks building a cabin and ramed a tree through your radiator?
     
  2. ajole

    ajole Supporting Member

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    Maintaining pressure could be a problem without good materials and construction...so I'm going low pressure.

    Without pressure, you'd need a lot more water, so maybe a remote reservoir with long tubes to aid with cooling. The reservoir could be a few 5 gallon cans in the trunk, or strapped to the roof. If you had 100 feet of hose, you could just run the hose through a bath, and maybe not suck the water out of the tanks at all.

    But, in a zombie flick...ANY radiator would work, just grab one out of the abandoned cars around and strap it to the front of the car and run hoses to where you need them.;)
     

  3. Hansj3

    Hansj3 Supporting Member

    My idea would be to solder a few copper tees together into a manifold and have a few small copper lines connect the whole thing. If I had time id even sweat in a hot water heater overpressure valve.

    But I like the no pressure idea.

    If it was cold enough a long large section of iron pipe might make it work for a few miles... maybe even more
     
  4. the problem with a no pressure system is hot spots that would form in the water jackets. the reason most cars are designed with a 15psi system is that it raises the boiling point of the coolant mix to prevent boiling from occurring around the cylinder walls, also known as cavitation. running 100% water requires about 22psi to prevent the hot spots from forming.

    for the zero pressure system to work, you would need to remove the restriction in the system, the thermostat. it would cool on sheer volume of water passing through the engine. of course on an obd2 system you would throw a cel, but in an emergency autozone would probably be closed anyway to have it checked.

    I think the hoses and water cans would be a good idea. probably need a few of them though.
     
  5. ajole

    ajole Supporting Member

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    Exactly. I was sort of wondering if the water pump would have issues with the head if you went on the roof, but didn't want to think too hard.:p
     
  6. MXGreg

    MXGreg Supporting Member

    If you are using a cooling system with a radiator, regardless of pressure, you'll need some sort of flow restriction (thermostat, etc). If not, the water flows too fast through the radiator to cool sufficiently causing the engine to over heat in short order.
     
  7. ajole

    ajole Supporting Member

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    I know the internet says that....but my '65 Bel Aire I had in high school says you're wrong.:p

    When I was young and broke, it was common to pull a thermostat to get overheating vehicles home. And then not bother replacing it until winter.;)
    Never caused any issues.
     
  8. undeRGRound

    undeRGRound ROLL wif Da MOLE! Supporting Member

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    Done it myself...
     
  9. thats why you need sheer volume for thermal mass
     
  10. ajole

    ajole Supporting Member

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    Maybe it's the newer cars with tiny radiators and fans to pull extra air that have the issue MXGreg is talking about?:confused:

    There sure are a LOT of folk on the net that say what he said. But then...there's a lot that see it my way, too.

    However...the guys that say it will overheat never give examples or real world experience, the rest of us do.:D
     
  11. undeRGRound

    undeRGRound ROLL wif Da MOLE! Supporting Member

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    It was prolly only under certain circumstances anyway...
     
  12. Hansj3

    Hansj3 Supporting Member

    I've seen one. Guy had a hot rod with an ultra high flow water pump and radiator and no stat. It twas slow to overheat at speed, it was kinda eere it would just creap up slowly until you idled it. He didnt get why it was running warm before and pulled the stat.

    Last I heard he put a stat back in and went with an electric water pump set up at some such optimal speed and got 15 HP back on the dyno.

    Most radiators have a good amount of restriction engineered into them for a reason i think
     
  13. undeRGRound

    undeRGRound ROLL wif Da MOLE! Supporting Member

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    Yes, heat transfer takes TIME.
    I could touch a hot plate burner or an iron, quickly, w/o getting burnt... :D
    Don't touch it for long! :eek:
     
  14. Atomic_Ed

    Atomic_Ed Member

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    Really tough one to answer if: "you were out in the sticks building a cabin and ramed a tree through your radiator?"

    If you are truly in the sticks and have no other materials to scrounge from, then you are SOL.

    I guess you could get by with some coolant media that has a high enough boiling point to not flash to vapor in the head or the cylinder walls and has a reasonable heat transfer rate to be an ambient pressure system. Maybe engine oil ?? Probably not.

    Then you would need some kind of heat transfer radiator and/or heat sink. Oil to a water bath that has the volume to collect heat for a while (??) Misting system to cool the homemade radiator (?) The CO2 bottle off of your beer keg could be used; maybe even the beer. :eek:

    One idea would be to pull the plugs on adjacent cylinders and use the fuel and air going into the unused cylinders as heat scavengers for the working cylinders.

    Tell me what you've got to work with and I can work out something.
     
  15. MXGreg

    MXGreg Supporting Member

    Sorry I didn't get back sooner. The over heating without a thermostat thing was not something I read on the internet. There was no such thing back then. Learned it the hard way, on a '57 Chevy. :D
     
  16. Dragonbreath

    Dragonbreath Member

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    I know of a farmer that owns a saw mill that was built from scratch. It's powered by a Chevy 350 that is cooled by a 55 gallon drum of water. Been running that way for at least 15 years. When I saw it I asked him how that it worked, and he said that when he put it together he replaced the thermostat with a flat washer with a 3/4 inch hole in it to slow the water down going through the block.
     
  17. MXGreg

    MXGreg Supporting Member

    http://www.summitracing.com/parts/mor-63440

    [​IMG]
     
  18. shubbell

    shubbell Member

    I would have to walk :blush:
     
  19. Rerun

    Rerun Member

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    My dad would do this on his Studebakers every spring until the first cold snap - maybe as late as November.

    eldar