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Greeting to all.

My son recently turned Four and is now helping me decap spent cases. (All safety is paramount including glasses and hand washing, no live primers or power). My reloading stuff is in the shop which is locked anyways. My firearms are all in the safe.

I was just curious when were you introduced too and when did you introduce your children to safety & firearms. Remove the curiosity etc. I would like to start introducing my son but really don't know how to begin.

Eddie Eagle?

***hold for reloading pic***
 

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when my wife and I got married, the only real exposure the kids had was what they got from me. They were 6, 7, and 8 when we got married. so we sat down and had the "don't touch unless dad is with you" talk. I let them handle the revolvers unloaded and took the mystique away, as the only requirement for touching any weapon in the house was they had to get me first, so we could do it safely.
Later, (much later because of finances, range time costs), each got to go to the range with me one-on-one, so it was special time.

And I have heard very good things concerning the Eddie the Eagle program.
 

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education began at age 6 when he started asking 'what's the range?' and I told him it was where I went to fire pistols and rifles and he of course wanted to go. Then I bought an air rifle and posted the 10 rules for firearms on the fridge. He had to memorize them before he could even pick it up. His love affair with the pellet gun ended the first time he fired my .22.
He knows not to mess with things (locked anyway) and treats everything with the respect they are due. At 4, I think an air rifle would be the best choice, unless you think he can handle a 22. The 'cricket' is great one, small enough. Something that shoots 22 short might not be a bad route either.
 

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I have no kids yet, but I grew up shooting my dad's AR15. I'm not sure when I actually started, but the first I can remember is shooting it into the bank for a noise-maker on new years around 5 or 6, probably a couple years after that I actually started shooting at targets.
 

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The first day I noticed the curious look in their eyes.. The boy since he was 4 now 9. the oldest Girl since she finaly decided to take interest at 6. now 10.
Younest at 5 doesnt have a care in the world for them other then to shoot zombies.. LOL

They hold them and of course they are unloading.. What got their attention on how they are dangerous was a 2liter coke bottle full of water and I shot it with the .45 and it exploded so to speak.. I said that would be your head if you got shot in it.. Girl turn white as a ghost and the boy almost peed his pants.

I include the son with every aspect from loading proceedures to cleaning.
He knows what they are capable of and knows not to touch unless I am there. Never had him go and try to get in the gun cab.. nor the girls..

The boy will get a Rossi Youth .410/.22 instead of the cricket for christmas.
 

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my one year old see's them from time to time. However there is no Way he could get his hands on one. Unless I, ME< am not doing MY job.

It is either on me or locked. The Big gauge at night gets unlocked till I get up.

As soon as he can talk and understand words I plan on starting the teaching process. I dont think that one talk will do a dang thing. So it will be a repeating event till he understands.

I will not go out of my way to be sure he doesnt see them. I dont want to make them a Taboo.............................................
 

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Since I have owned or had possesion of guns since I was 14 ( a different time back then ) I started teaching my daughter about gun safety as soon as I thought she could start to understand. Not the shooting aspect of guns but the safty side. I always had my guns in a safe and was never worried about her gaining access to mine but always wondered if the homes she would visit had parents that were as concerned with safety as was I. I wanted to try as much as possible to insure she would know enough to not touch and to not stay around if any other friends got a hold of a gun. Sadly not everone that owns a gun is a responsible adult.
 
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I introduced my children to firearms the day i picked up my first gun from the shop. I had it in my lap for a good while like a house cat.
 

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I started teaching my daughter about gun saftey as soon as she showed curiosity in them. I taught her how a gun works and how bad it can hurt you if misused. I havent taught her how to shoot yet because I don't think she is ready yet, but I learned at 7 and I think she wil be ready by them. I think a lot of us gun guys tend to get too excited about teaching there kid to shoot and do it too early but maturity is different from child to child. I always try to keep this in mind I was ready and mature enough to safely have a gun of my own at 12 years old, I don't think I could say the same abou tme at 15 or 16 years old, and by 17 my head was screwed back on correctly. I think it is more important to look at how mature a child is then a certain age.
 

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I introduced my children to firearms the day i picked up my first gun from the shop. I had it in my lap for a good while like a house cat.
That's about the same as I did.
 

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I don't have any of my own, but if I have some friends who are less than responsible I take it upon myself (with their blessing) to do my own little firearm safety... if they handle daddy/mommy's guns, I make sure they know that if booger hook goes on bang switch, black plastic boomstick goes bye bye.

Same approach used for some of my friends who are even worse than little kids because they're used to bad habits.
 

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No kids of my own, but my dad intro'd me to firearms when I was about 10: every gun is loaded, even when you know it isn't, and you only point it at something you want to kill.

There's a lot of hesitation in that.

Of course there's more, but that covers a lot for a ten-year-old to master, and the basics have never failed me.
 

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I take my daughter to the range regulary. (She is nine). I teach her firearm safety, and of course it's so cool watching her use range commands like a pro. Makes me all puffed up inside. What's really cool is when I pick up any of the guns in her presence at home, she will always ask me "Daddy have you cleared that to make sure it's not loaded?"

My dad started us a lot earlier than that. I shot my first gun when I was about four. I think it had the record for widest shot in NE Kentucky, but fortunately I got better over time. IMHO as soon as your children can understand and articulate verbal instructions its the right age to begin training them in firearm safety.
 

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My stepkids and nephews were still in diapers when I started teaching them that guns were not toys, and were not to be touched by them no matter what unless an adult was there teaching them.

I never left my weapons out, but could not control any other houses they were at, so I wanted them to start out understanding that much at least.
 
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I had the honor of becomming a step father when my son was already 7. I would have honestly started younger. His first gun was the classic BB gun (a little Daisy 105 http://daisy.com/shopping/customer/product.php?productid=16139&cat=249&page=1)

I took him strait to full scale safety, down to putting a gun down under a fence and crossing the fence at least ten feet away then going to retrive the gun. Some thought that to be a bit much on a BB gun, but when I took him hunting at 12 with a 410, a 22 and a 357 NEF rifle I never worried he would shoot his old man.

I have since bought him a 243 and a 870 20 Gauge. He has kind of lost interest but I keep the guns in good shape for him and hope that old song about how they always come back around holds true. What I know is he can defend himself and his family when he starts one, he knows how to be safe and won't buy into the anti gun crap, that is about all a man can do. He is 19 now and makes me pround every day, just started his second year of college.

If I had to do it again, I would not change a thing.
 

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I don't have kids but I think it is great that so many of you guys are teaching them so early. I think the earlier the better. I believe shooting and the responsibilities associated with gun ownership is some what a right of passage. If you can teach a child to respect a gun, chances are you have already taught them to respect people and property as well.
 

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I have 5 kids. 14 years down to 2. I start them out at 5 years old. (First three already done). On their fifth birthday I buy them a single shot. Either a .22 boys rifle or a .410. The 14 year old got a H&R Survivor in .410/45LC. It's not their age but the level of their maturity. Still you have to remember that they are kids and you have to really keep an eye on them.

Here is a picture of my oldest middle son at the range.

 

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I dont have any kids of my own yet but when the day comes I thnk Im going to do like my dad did. I was about 7 when I was first allowed to shoot but before then I was allowed to look at and ask questions about them anytime I wanted.
One thing I am doing right now is my best friend is teaching his 10 yrd borther to shoot so Ive got to help in that. The first thing we did with him was shoot a water jug with my 30/06. We had him about 10 yards behind us and his eyes got huge as the jug exploded. I said that is how powerful a gun is andthey are dangerous if not used properly. After that there as a good intro with a 22 and now about 9 months later hes an ace wth it and moved up to bigger things. Poor kid has shot one shot from MN 30/06 and JCP. Hes decent with his bothers 9MM and does well wth an SKS.
 

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I only recently (just over a year ago) started getting involved in guns and shooting. My youngest son was 7 at the time. We'd talk about how the guns weren't toys and how they could be really dangerous.

One day a few months ago, my youngest son asked me "why can't I point a gun at someone if I know it's not loaded?" By this time he was 8. He and I sat down at the computer and I brought up this website http://xavierthoughts.blogspot.com/2005/11/from-email.html It's the story of a guy who KNEW his Glock wasn't loaded, and ended up putting a .45 cal hole in his own hand. I just told my son again and again "this guy's gun wasn't loaded. He knew it wasn't loaded. He was SURE it wasn't loaded. Son, every gun is always loaded."

Since that time, when any of my sons is handling a gun, I check the chamber myself before handing it to them, then I insist they check the chamber themselves. After they check the chamber I'll ask "is it loaded?" Any answer other than "yes" (regardless of what they see) is the wrong answer.

The proudest moment came on our last trip to the range. I handed my youngest son a .22 and absent-mindedly said something like "it's not loaded." He didn't check the chamber, he just looked at me and said "yes it is, it always is."

I just wanted to share that URL with everyone. In my home, it's proven to be a useful teaching tool and cautionary tale (for all of us) that EVERY gun is ALWAYS loaded, even if you've checked the chamber and rechecked it, it's still loaded.
 
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It's not their age but the level of their maturity. Still you have to remember that they are kids and you have to really keep an eye on them.
Spoken like a subject matter expert!

Another thing. Even before the range, the kids will see guns on tv, etc. and you can tell them if they see/find a gun not to touch it and get an adult.
 
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