How Long Will Ammo Last?

By lklawson, Jul 27, 2020 | |
Rating:
5/5,
  1. lklawson

    lklawson Staff Member

    lklawson submitted a new Article:

    How Long Will Ammo Last?

    Read more about this article here...
     
    GrumpyOlMan and Dubar like this.
  2. Dubar

    Dubar Supporting Member

    Good article!

    I had some 22 shorts that had to have been bought back in the early 60s and they shot fine. I have a small quantity of various ww2 ammo that still looks good, just don’t have anything to shoot it out of.

    I do worry some about tarnishing new ammo that I touch with my fingers, but so far that shoots fine too. I keep all my ammo in ammo boxes and locked away in a cabinet...for the honest folk. A burgler with tools could get to it fairly easy.
     
    lklawson likes this.

  3. SWAGA

    SWAGA No longer broke... Lifetime Supporter

    I’ve never had ammo that lasted longer then one shot.
     
    undeRGRound, Twisty, greg_r and 3 others like this.
  4. FlashBang

    FlashBang I Stand With Talon Lifetime Supporter

    I've got original issue 1942 German 8mm and also 1944 8x56R German Military ammunition in En Bloc clips that is as good as the day it was made.
     
  5. Oldest ammunition I have was made in the Civil War days. It is .56-56 cartridge ammo used in the Spencer Repeating Rifle and I have fired some of it. It still works great! I am joking.

    Oldest ammunition I likely have is military surplus 7.62 x 51 that was made in the 1970s. I have shot some of it and had no issues with it.
     
    lklawson and Think1st like this.
  6. Think1st

    Think1st Supporting Member

    8,966
    2,479
    Florida
    Same here with the 7.62 NATO. I also have 7.62x54R from the '70s that will give me five-round groups of 2" or less out of my Mosin Nagants at 100 yards. I have to punch the bore after each magazine, though. The fouling is actually bad enough to double the size of the groups after a couple magazines.
     
    lklawson and 1024Megabytes like this.
  7. Not2ManyGuns

    Not2ManyGuns Member

    724
    91
    I have a G & J W Hawksley hunting powder flask that was made in Sheffield, England during the 1830's that still had powder in it. Wanting to display it in my house, I emptied the powder on a wooden board, then lit it with a match tapped to a long pole and was surprised to see that it not only ignited but was stunned at how fast it ignited. Since then, I wish I had only tried this with a little bit of the powder and kept the remaining amount in the flask.
     
  8. Dragonbreath

    Dragonbreath Member

    785
    441
    Alabama
    I had some black tip 30-06 that was made in 1953. It all went bang.
     
  9. shepherd321

    shepherd321 Supporting Member

    1,697
    611
    in a hot car i replace every month
     
  10. HP/C9/45ACP

    HP/C9/45ACP Member

    844
    117
    I've got several surplus cans worth of early-mid 40's era 7.62x54R that I bought in 2012. When I received it I removed it from the original cans and stored it in a .20 cal. can with a good seal so far every round I've tried has fired on the first click. Still kicks like it did when new. I've also got over a brick of .22LR that mom gave me after dad passed away I suspect it's probably early '70's- early 80's era ammo. I haven't shot any of that .22LR but, I suspect it would be fine. If stored properly ammo would probably last nearly indefinitely. A couple years ago I found a partial bulk pack of Winchester .22LR in my safe that was probably 15-20 years old a few of them had to cycled through a second time but as I remember they all shot with the exception of maybe one load. Maybe having to cycle them a second time to get them to fire was because they were old, maybe it was just a bad batch of primer. Reasonably often even on new .22LR I'll have a few loads per brick that have to be cycled a second time around. There's some 12 ga. paper shotgun shells at mom's house that were brought from my grandfathers house when he passed away in 1965. My grandfather hadn't been able to hunt for several years prior to his death so they probably date back to the '50's or very early '60's. None of them have been shot in years but, they've been kept cool/dry so I'd be willing to bet they'd still fire.
     
    Think1st, lklawson and Rerun like this.
  11. oldgunowner

    oldgunowner Member

    6
    1
    don't store in your attic and keep it dry it will outlast your lifetime.
     
  12. TNTRAILERTRASH

    TNTRAILERTRASH Supporting Member

    I've got 5 cases of Lake City 30-06 Springfield ammo I need some help testing.........bandoliers, and 8rd clips with the cardboard protectors..........1940 lot number.
     
    1024Megabytes likes this.
  13. undeRGRound

    undeRGRound ROLL wif Da MOLE! Supporting Member

    25,343
    1,569
    INDY
    I should not have any problems with 9mm purchased in 2013 then.
    It was properly stored with cans of Kirk's home made desiccant in an
    airtight Hardigg Case, US Navy markings. The case, when opened, smelled
    very fresh an clean due to Kirk's stuff ;) What is that again, @lklawson ??

    I'm very happy with it, I last stowed it in 2015 and after 5 years everything
    seemed perfect! Great Bargain, these desi-cans!
     
    lklawson likes this.
  14. OldOutlaw

    OldOutlaw Supporting Member

    I've got Yugoslavian 7.62X39 made in 1970 through 1980 with brass casings. Some on 10 round stripper clips and most in 40 round boxes.
    All except what I have opened is in original ammo crates. Looks and shoots like brand new expensive brass ammo. Just keep any ammo some what cool, but more importantly, dry.
     
    lklawson and undeRGRound like this.
  15. lklawson

    lklawson Staff Member

    Silica gel kitty litter.

    Peace favor your sword (mobile)