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And it seems to be more discussed than what to actually do when TSHTF. Anybody can weigh in on this but i was just wondering if being prepared stockpile wise was necessarily better than being prepared in common knowledge and your environment. The reason i ask is because A friend of my dads was talking about how he had a place all sorted out if anything bad were to happen, then he went on to say that all he would need to make it through any situation is to stockpile food, water, and ammo. Is this a common belief among people because? I personally think that it would be better to be prepared to live off your surroundings rather than to stockpile and run off and hunker down with your goodies. I don't know, maybe I'm wrong, but it seems like there's something flawed with the thought process of "hide as much stuff as you can then try to live off it later", to me. Feel free to share your thoughts.
 

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Knowledge of your surroundings and how to use it are vital in a SHTF or TEOTWAWKI situation. However, stockpiling of food, clothing, blankets, tools, weapons and ammo will make the knowledge that you have easier to put to use. A stockpile will only last so long. Yet,while it lasts, you can better concentrate on making the things to replace what wears out in the stockpile with what you have available in your area. Trying to make a blanket from an elk hide in the middle of winter while your freezing is not a fun proposition. :'( Making the same elk hide blanket to replace the woolen Swiss Army blanket that you stockpiled and are currently using to stay warm in the winter time is a completely different situation. ^-^

So stockpiling should be seen as a way to get you through the initial trauma of a SHTF or TEOTWAWKI situation. After you have settled in and fully realize the extent of the situation using the stockpiled goods and materials, then you can change your mindset from "What the HECK just happened?" to "OK, we're all here and accounted for. Let's see what we need to do to ride out this situation until better times get here." 8)

Depending on where your bug-out/bug-in site is located, you can make do with stockpiling simple hand tools, long storage duration foods, wool blankets, wood for a wood stove, a couple of 995s or 4095s with mags and ammo, a couple of pistols in matching caliber with the rifles, first aid supplies, and seasonal clothing. :D

Under hand tools, a well stocked tool kit with a Yankee driver and several sizes of drywall/multipurpose screws is good to have. Also, a good hatchet, single bit ax, wood splitting maul or wedge and sledge hammer for gathering firewood. A draw knife for peeling logs is also a good idea if you can find one. Several mill files for sharpening your edged tools will come in handy also. Think like a frontiersman as to what to stockpile and what you can make from the surrounding materials. As you can see, there are many things that can be stockpiled that are not readily available in nature. ^-^
 

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+1 to what HPhooked said

Better to "stockpile" a good basic supply of stuff you may need. Now that does not mean you have to build a bunker and "hunker down" for the duration. It just means that you should plan ahead and keep extra of the stuff you normally buy. You would be surprised how fast even just 3 months worth of food will build up. There are tons of sites out there that can get you on the path to building up a supply. It doesn't take a lot of room either. Done right you can actually save quite a bit of money this way because you are buying in bulk for a lot of items. Its a lifestyle.

Becoming a bit of a scrounge doesn't hurt either. Check out such websites as Freecycle.org. This is a Yahoo based community that you can pick up unwanted items from others in the community in your area as well as get rid of your unwanted stuff. I've picked up old hunting and camping gear from folks where I am at and also got rid of some stuff that I no longer wanted.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Knowledge of your surroundings and how to use it are vital in a SHTF or TEOTWAWKI situation. However, stockpiling of food, clothing, blankets, tools, weapons and ammo will make the knowledge that you have easier to put to use. A stockpile will only last so long. Yet,while it lasts, you can better concentrate on making the things to replace what wears out in the stockpile with what you have available in your area. Trying to make a blanket from an elk hide in the middle of winter while your freezing is not a fun proposition. :'( Making the same elk hide blanket to replace the woolen Swiss Army blanket that you stockpiled and are currently using to stay warm in the winter time is a completely different situation. ^-^

So stockpiling should be seen as a way to get you through the initial trauma of a SHTF or TEOTWAWKI situation. After you have settled in and fully realize the extent of the situation using the stockpiled goods and materials, then you can change your mindset from "What the HECK just happened?" to "OK, we're all here and accounted for. Let's see what we need to do to ride out this situation until better times get here." 8)

Depending on where your bug-out/bug-in site is located, you can make do with stockpiling simple hand tools, long storage duration foods, wool blankets, wood for a wood stove, a couple of 995s or 4095s with mags and ammo, a couple of pistols in matching caliber with the rifles, first aid supplies, and seasonal clothing. :D

Under hand tools, a well stocked tool kit with a Yankee driver and several sizes of drywall/multipurpose screws is good to have. Also, a good hatchet, single bit ax, wood splitting maul or wedge and sledge hammer for gathering firewood. A draw knife for peeling logs is also a good idea if you can find one. Several mill files for sharpening your edged tools will come in handy also. Think like a frontiersman as to what to stockpile and what you can make from the surrounding materials. As you can see, there are many things that can be stockpiled that are not readily available in nature. ^-^
Wise words. But ive got ask whats the deal with the drywall screws? And this is exactly the way things should be done. But from my experience with people most said they would bug out and hunker down until they can go to the local walmart if you know what i mean.
 
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Well stockpiling lends itself to the assumption you'll be setting up fort in your house......not on the move. If you've got to be on the move, a spare room full of food , ammo and tools is only good to those who happen upon your house after you've left, as you can only carry so much and still be able to move effectively. In this case, I would think dry wall , ply-wood and the like would be helpful to close off entry points, and block windows. Depending on how long it goes, or how bad it gets and how prepared those around you are, I would think a fire in the fireplace could also be a dangerous proposition, like advertising you are home and may have supplies.
 

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This is a toppic thats been coming up alot lately in many different forums .. Every one should have at least an emergency ration of food for at least two weeks .. Thats for any disaster from a bad storm taking out power to TSHTF virus outbreak .. Luckily in any situation most homes have at least a 30gallon supply of water durring a power outage .. That device being your water heater ..
 

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Scottder, I imagine the drywall screws are for building a shelter or repairing the one you're in. Also, you want to stock some para-cord, nails, and maybe a couple of small tarps along with some zip ties. Thinking "outside the box" also includes the one you're currently living in. If you have to bug out, you're priorities should be water, then shelter, then food depending on where you live. The elements may dictate that you build your shelter first since you can freeze to death a lot faster than you can live without water. 8)
 
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