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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is just an idea i wanted to run by the guys.
I spilt some powder and the stuff goes everywhere. i know using a shop vac would be a no no, due to the chance of a spark inside the canister. My thought was to use a cut off piece of pantyhose in the hose secured by the attachment you are using with 2 or 3 used dryer sheets, to reduce static electricity, inside the hos. that way the powder does not reach the canister, and can be disposed of.
like i said This is only an academic discussion at this point.

thoughts???
 

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Have never tried, as I don't reload, but try using a coffee filter. I would think that the holes in the pantyhose would be too big. I don't know if you could get enough suction through the filter though.

I know that to vacuum up copier toner, Xerox reps use a special filter that can be placed in almost any canister style vacuum.
 

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I think that would work, or use a paper towel as there is a better chance that air will circulate through the material resulting in less restriction in air flow and less work on the vacuum motor.
 

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Anytime I have a powder spill I use a fine bristle brush to the get bulk cleaned up and then a small 12v auto vac for the rest. My auto vac has a filter that traps any debries from getting into the impeller area so it works similar to your panty hose/dryer sheet idea.

You could also use a wet/dry shop vac and make sure the pre-filter is installed then put about 1/4 tank of water in the vac canister and proceed as if you were cleaning up a liquid spill. The powder would be trapped in the water and any loose particles would be trapped in the pre-filter.
 

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Also other than static electricity you need not worry about modern vacs motors sparking the stuff off as they are completely isolated.. Mythbusters proved this by running several modern vacs with a quart of gas in the canister and no boom :( Adam was bummed :lol:
 

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Ahem....I won't mention using my wife's Hoover Windtunnel bagless vac to just suck it out of the carpet....

Perhaps I'm either lucky or just looking for some excitement. ;)

wizard93
 

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Interesting. As I don't reload and therefore don't work with powder, I don't have first-hand experience, but I think I'd try maybe two layers of pantyhose.

I know vocuum cleaners aren't supposed to spark, but with my luck, I'd be doing it the one time that it did. Then I'd be posting something like:

"Subject: ND with my Hoover upright!"
 

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remember the powder isn't going to explode unless it's black powder... it will just burn fast ... unless it's under pressure it won't even blow the vac apart...
 

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remember the powder isn't going to explode unless it's black powder... it will just burn fast ... unless it's under pressure it won't even blow the vac apart...
Neither will black power unless you have a large amount confinded in a very small space - it will also just burn. It has to be contained tightly in a large amount in order to detonate. I used to do Civil war artillery reenacting - we have used up to 2lb charges of 1f (charges wrapped in foil) in our guns - as long as we were using goex, we would get a good "BOOM", but with elephant , it would just burn with a rather anemic sound - I always said that elephant power in a cannon sounded like a elephant fart.. (if a event gave us a power bounty, and the powder was elephant brand, we would refuse it).
In the amounts of a spill (unless it was a 25lb bulk bag) you would not have enought to explode, it will just burn.
 

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This is a long shot but if you have 2 vacuum hoses and a empty 5 gallon bucket with a lid you can make yourself a vacuum chamber and isolate the powder from the actual vacuum.

Simply make two holes on opposite sides of the lid of the bucket.

Put the vacuum hose in one hole just slightly in (you may want o use a panty hose for extra filtering).

Put the other hose about also slightly into the other hole, make sure its sealed tightly.

Turn on the vacuum and go at it. Most particles should get trapped in the bucket. You can also use this to make your standard vacuum into a wet-vac... just keep an eye on the water level.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
that is a great idea bushman. you could also add some water to the bottom of the "chamber" it would be like a water bong, or so i am told.
 

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I preffer to call them "contemporary water pipes".
 
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Ok...other than the fact that autosurgeon mentions that mythbusters proved it safe, you could use some central AC/Heater filter material as a pre-filter. I've been using my mini shop vac for week's to suck up Hogdon's Varget and some HP-38 which is like flake. I don't use any pre-filters or anything. And I almost never empty the thing. The sort of bib thing that fits over the foam filter with a rubberband inside all the modern shop vacs seems to do the trick.

If I blow up anytime soon I'll let you guys know.
 

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I think the only real issue would be if the powder is smaller than the holes in the filter. Most vacs today have a filter/bag prior to the motor. I know that copier toner is finer than most store bought filters, even hepa. Not sure about any powders though.

Vacs now use the filter prior to the motor to prevent things getting caught in, and possibly damaging, the motor.
 
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As I am not a re-loader really as of yet, I have not had the privelege of a spill . If I do I will use my Kirby. I have a thing I made similar to what bushman suggested. Now I haven't tried to vacuum gun powder yet but have a question. I have used it to pickup other powdery stuff.I just use the plastic paint bucket to pickup water. But with a Kirby (don't know how many are familiar with their design) has a metal blade that pretty much contacts anything that it picks up. Would this make any difference? The blade gets fairly hot as well. Would that matter?
 
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The old Kirby's were a marvel of engineering. Very stout old machines. I used to see alot of them come through the used furniture store I worked at as a teenager. I could barely pick them up to carry them when I was about 12 or 13.

Now if there was a ever an old style, non insulated motor type vacum cleaner that you shouldn't be sucking up gunpowder with...that may just be it.

Let us know how it works out. You should have a fire extinguisher handy and keep emergency exits in mind during your experiments. Good luck!
 

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If you do use a Kirby Vac, use a newer one, a G-4 or newer. These units have double sealed electric fan housings to keep dust and dirt from going into the motor. The older units were sealed, but not as well as the newer units. Once I can afford one, I will be buying a Kirby vacuum. It's hard to beat their quality and customer service. It also helps that my brother sells them and I can get a good deal.
 
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Mine is a G6 Diamond I think. I know it is only about a yr old. They are great. They actually pull things out of the carpet others have left behind. I thought my carpets were clean after using an Oreck for many months and then shampooing. I used the Kirby and it picked up crap I didn't even know was there. The best part of a Kirby is if it picks up a penny or a screw it doesn't go into the bag. It goes into the chamber. I like being able to recover my springs and stuff.
 

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<Bump just for conversational purposes>

Any other tips on cleaning up spilled powder?

Peace favor your sword,
Kirk
 
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