Is Walther the same as S&W?

Discussion in 'General Firearms Discussion' started by bluharley, Apr 7, 2015.

  1. bluharley

    bluharley Member

  2. geekandwife

    geekandwife Good ole Boy Member

    It's a Walther made by Smith and Wesson.
     

  3. Think1st

    Think1st Supporting Member

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    It's Walther. My P-22 says the same thing. I don't recall the specifics because It's been awhile since I read the thread on the Walther forum, but S&W had a portion of a role in the assembly at some point. Let me do some looking around to find the specifics.
     
  4. Think1st

    Think1st Supporting Member

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  5. Kiln

    Kiln Member

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    Interestingly enough the P22 is built by Umarex, branded by Walther, and imported by S&W.

    More interestingly though is that it's made mostly from zamak but costs about as much as a Ruger MK series pistol.
     
  6. Think1st

    Think1st Supporting Member

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    The slide is pretty much all ZAMAK. I've taken mine pretty much all the way apart several times, and the fire control group, which comes out of the polymer frame in one piece, seems to be made of steel.

    On the frame, interestingly enough, it does say "Made in Germany."
    It's been a good pistol and has functioned well enough with most types of ammo. It particularly likes Remington Golden Bullets and the blue-box Federal HV rounds. Those will run pretty much flawlessly. The CCI standard velocity rounds also work well in it.

    By the way, I think that Ruger's SR22 is pretty much a carbon copy of it, too. I wouldn't mind getting one of those at some point.
     
  7. Kiln

    Kiln Member

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    The Umarex factory is in Germany so it genuinely is made there. Many people associate German made things automatically with high quality. The same can be said for guns with big names stamped on them, even those built primarily of zamak. I had a P22 before and it was a massive pain in my backside. It did teach me how to clear every malfunction imagineable so I guess it was useful in an odd way.

    Lots of people seem to have decent experiences with the P22 (later models) and it was one of the nicest looking and most comfortable guns I've ever had. My experience is still sour though and I think they're ridiculously overpriced for what they are and what they're made of.

    The Ruger SR22 is similar but the slide is built from aluminum rather than zamak and it generally has much better reviews. The one frequently occuring problem with the SR22 seems to be takedown lever failures that eject your slide forward after a few thousand rounds. If they ever fix that issue I'll buy one. Until then I recommend the Neos, MK3, 22/45, or Buckmark to anyone who wants a solid .22lr pistol.
     
  8. Think1st

    Think1st Supporting Member

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    The earlier P-22s apparently had some sharp geometries on their hammers, which caused some excessive drag under the slide, as well as a lot of malfunctions as a result.

    I heard about the SR22 takedown lever from a YouTube review of it, one day, while I was doing some research on it. That particular aspect of it does weigh on mind. Speaking of the other River .22s out there, do the MkIII and 22/45 tear down as conveniently as the P-22 and SR22?

    The Neos looks like a pretty decent one, too, but I'm not sure of it's teardown method. As for the Buckmark, I think that it is a neat pistol, but having to use tiny screwdrivers and keep track of the little screws doesn't make me too enthusiastic about it. I like a (relatively) straight-forward slide slide removal to be involved in pistol teardown.
     
  9. Kiln

    Kiln Member

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    1. NOOOOOOO. Lol. No. The 22/45 and the MK3 are much more annoying and doing it wrong can lock up the insides in a very annoying way. Good news is that 10,000+ rounds downrange on my MK3 and I've taken it all the way down exactly one time. Spray it out with an aerosol solvent, oil it, and clean the barrel/chamber and you're set for another brick of ammo.

    It isn't exactly impossible to tear it down but it isn't nearly as easy as the P22.

    2. The Neos has an incredibly simple takedown and actually has very few parts to deal with so it is easy to clean. To take it down you lock back the slide, press a button on the frame, and turn a nut until the barrel comes off and it is field stripped. It is acually probably the easiest "target" style .22 pistol to strip that I've ever owned. The one real complaint I have is that the front sight blade is wider than I'd like.
     
  10. Think1st

    Think1st Supporting Member

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    It sounds to me like the Neos is the way to go for a next .22 pistol, then. Even for my JHP, I like to tear it down for thorough cleaning every time, so the fact that the Neos does allow for it is a big bonus.
     
  11. lklawson

    lklawson Staff Member

    I have both the NEOS and the SR22. The fit different roles. I think the ruger is better suited as a trainer or introductory gun for someone interested in SD or CC where the NEOS is a better target gun.

    Peace favor your sword (mobile)
     
  12. But the NEOS looks like a Buck Rogers ray gun...:p
     
  13. Think1st

    Think1st Supporting Member

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    I definitely would like to get an actual target-type pistol to go with my P-22. The one that I have is the target model, which I bought just for the longer sight radius to help when I was first training my wife, but it certainly is not a true target gun. It is, overall, way too small to facilitate really precise grouping for my hand. It is, nevertheless, a really fun range toy.


    Plus, I think that it was Tom Cruise's sidearm in the movie "Oblivion."
     
  14. lklawson

    lklawson Staff Member

    Which is why I bought it. :)

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk