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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, don't flame me too bad if this is a no go. The synthetic safe Birchwood Casey Gun Scrubber is essentially aerosol pressurized isopropyl alcohol, at $12.99 a can. Would it be unreasonable to fill a garden variety spray bottle with isopropyl alcohol and use that as a 'synthetic safe' gun cleaner?

This is after learning the hard way that brake cleaner WILL dissolve some plastics, and strip the finish off of a stock
 

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Actually it is 65% Hexane and only 25% alcohol see MSDS.. http://www.birchwoodcasey.com/sport/msdspdfs/33344-G2A13.pdf

Note your idea has merit but with out the high pressure jetting action for cleaning out firing pin channels I am not sure about why it would be better than any other cleaner... other than it would evaporate quickly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks AS, I never thought to check the MSDS, maybe I can get one of those refillable pressure cans like you do with brake cleaner. Hmm, a world of experiements!
 

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I always go to the MSDS... on chemicals... but then I teach my students to use the MSDS so I had better do what I preach!
 

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So, don't flame me too bad if this is a no go. The synthetic safe Birchwood Casey Gun Scrubber is essentially aerosol pressurized isopropyl alcohol, at $12.99 a can. Would it be unreasonable to fill a garden variety spray bottle with isopropyl alcohol and use that as a 'synthetic safe' gun cleaner?

This is after learning the hard way that brake cleaner WILL dissolve some plastics, and strip the finish off of a stock
NEVER NEVER NEVER use brake clean or carb clean or plastic, polymer, or wood. It appears the alcohol would be fine to use.
 

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i don't know the answer to your question , but i notice you have a mosin nagant , if it's still in it's shellac then make sure you don't get any alcohol on the shellac .
Actually, isopropyl alcohol won't hurt the shellac, some have tried to use it in the past on M/N stocks. Denatured alcohol is what will strip shellac, it's more of a solvent type solution than isopropyl. Got the info from a cabinet maker on another C&R forum in a discussion of what that nasty flaky finish is, some stocks were shellaced, others were laquered, and what will remove it.
 
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