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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
DIBS!!!

Shipping container houses have been around for a while; these focus on those wanting to get off the grid.

All Terrain Cabin:



Canada's Bark Design Collective built the All Terrain Cabin (ATC) as a showcase for sustainable (and Canadian!) ingenuity. The small home is based on a standard shipping container, and is said to be suitable for a family of four, plus a pet, to live off the grid in comfort and style.

The cabin folds up to look like any old shipping container, and can be sent via rail, truck, ship, airplane or even helicopter. When you're ready to rest your bones, the cabin quickly unfolds to 480 square feet of living space, with a range of creature comforts.

The Ecopod:



Another container home designed for on- or off-grid living is the Ecopod. Made from a shipping container, an electric winch is used to raise and lower the heavy deck door (power is supplied by a solar panel). The floor is made from recycled car tires, and the walls have birch paneling (over closed-cell soya foam insulation). The glass is double paned to slow heat transfer.

The Ecopod can be used as a stand alone unit or with other structures. It is designed to minimize environmental impact.

Bug out in style.
-'bridge
 

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Thats neat. I want to go off the grid one day. I want to build a steel pole building and live in a loft and half the bottom. And have a garage and utility room in the other half. Solar and wind baby.
 

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Yyyeeesss..... but. Have you considered the weight of an empty 20' shipping container? And then all the finish materials? Have you ever tried to move a shipping container without a large forklift? On soft, uneven ground? Have you seen one of the ramp trucks that are used for slide-off delivery? None of these things are compatible with other than a site that you can drive to with a minimum of a 16,000 lb (empty) truck. This is probably a good idea if you are providing lots of units to a single site with equipment and manpower. But a remote site? What are you going to set the container on? Blocks, piers, what? How are you going to do that? What will keep this 'foundation' from moving? These type of structures are architectural students projects, and they're small. Think about it a bit. How much insulation can you afford to install? The containers are less than 8' wide inside, and 1" of foam insulation on the walls will give you between and R-4 and R-7 depending on the type. How many inches of space will you sacrifice for insulation? Less than R-8 or so and you will cook in the summer and freeze in the winter. If you're looking for simple, sturdy, remote site building, think wood frame, metal roof, wood or metal sheathing and siding. Materials are available everywhere and can be worked with simple tools and skills either on or off site. They can be packed in to impossible places (with time and determination), you can start small and add on, and you are not limited to any particular size or shape.
I've done this many, many times; islands, mountains, deep woods, outback. It's hard work, even for a small simple building, but remote sites demand either using materials at hand with lots of labor and time, or materials carried in with less labor (or some labor performed off site), or all labor performed off site and delivery of a complete unit with heavy and expensive equipment and site preparation.
This is the survival forum we're on here. Simple. Low cost. Rugged. Invisible.
 

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Yyyeeesss..... but. Have you considered the weight of an empty 20' shipping container? And then all the finish materials? Have you ever tried to move a shipping container without a large forklift? On soft, uneven ground? Have you seen one of the ramp trucks that are used for slide-off delivery? None of these things are compatible with other than a site that you can drive to with a minimum of a 16,000 lb (empty) truck. This is probably a good idea if you are providing lots of units to a single site with equipment and manpower. But a remote site? What are you going to set the container on? Blocks, piers, what? How are you going to do that? What will keep this 'foundation' from moving? These type of structures are architectural students projects, and they're small. Think about it a bit. How much insulation can you afford to install? The containers are less than 8' wide inside, and 1" of foam insulation on the walls will give you between and R-4 and R-7 depending on the type. How many inches of space will you sacrifice for insulation? Less than R-8 or so and you will cook in the summer and freeze in the winter. If you're looking for simple, sturdy, remote site building, think wood frame, metal roof, wood or metal sheathing and siding. Materials are available everywhere and can be worked with simple tools and skills either on or off site. They can be packed in to impossible places (with time and determination), you can start small and add on, and you are not limited to any particular size or shape.
I've done this many, many times; islands, mountains, deep woods, outback. It's hard work, even for a small simple building, but remote sites demand either using materials at hand with lots of labor and time, or materials carried in with less labor (or some labor performed off site), or all labor performed off site and delivery of a complete unit with heavy and expensive equipment and site preparation.
This is the survival forum we're on here. Simple. Low cost. Rugged. Invisible.
Great, having all this fun at the parade, and now I need an umbrella.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yyyyeeesss...... but. Have you considered that I really want one? :D

Seriously, nobody here would actually go to the lengths it would take to get one of these monstrosities parked out in the boonies. I'd rather have one of those little premade shed/cabin deals if it came to that anyway.

But I have to give the designers props for coming up with uses for shipping containers that are actually attractive, if not affordable and practical for we SHTFanners.

What we need is for Pelican or Hardigg to start building survival shelters!

-'bridge
 

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Absolutely! If you start with a shed people won't give it a second look and the price is very reasonable. A container is fairly expensive to begin with and having it sitting on your property will certainly draw attention.

Yyyyeeesss...... but. Have you considered that I really want one? :D

Seriously, nobody here would actually go to the lengths it would take to get one of these monstrosities parked out in the boonies. I'd rather have one of those little premade shed/cabin deals if it came to that anyway.

But I have to give the designers props for coming up with uses for shipping containers that are actually attractive, if not affordable and practical for we SHTFanners.

What we need is for Pelican or Hardigg to start building survival shelters!

-'bridge
 

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Absolutely! If you start with a shed people won't give it a second look and the price is very reasonable. A container is fairly expensive to begin with and having it sitting on your property will certainly draw attention.
I don't know how it is this year, but last year you could find the really long hsipping containers for less than 2k. In some parts of the country you could get them free. It cost more to ship a container back to china empty than it did to just buy a new one from the chinese.
 
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this is an awesome idea. but i agree start with a shed...the only up side i see for the shipping container would be a bomb or something....i donno. if i were living off the grid a shed would be enough for me....that sounds funnn yay :D
 
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