Lee Bulge Buster .40S&W

Discussion in 'Reloading Room' started by GoesBang, Oct 16, 2015.

  1. GoesBang

    GoesBang Supporting Member

    So two weeks ago I bought a Lee Bulge Buster "kit." Today while I was at Graf's I purchased the Lee 4-die carbide set. Took it home and immediately attempted to bust the bulges that might have been in any of the empty cases I already had.

    In my hurried rush I forgot to fully read the instruction sheet again. I left the steel crimp sleeve in the die and attempted to bust the bulges. Upon the second casing I noticed a severe impediment to my work. The first case was stuck in the crimp sleeve.

    The bulge buster works great when you remove the part that doesn't belong.

    Now I have two options: 1) figure out how to unstick the case 2) buy another factory crimp die.
     
  2. GoesBang

    GoesBang Supporting Member

    I fixed it. All better now.
     

  3. moona11

    moona11 King of you Monkeys Lifetime Supporter

    I have one and never used it. Yet.
     
  4. welderman

    welderman Member

    Alright. I'm thinking of getting a bulge buster for my die set. Looking at the description on the retail web sites it says not to use them on Glock brass. So here's the newbie question; How do you know the Glock fired brass?
     
  5. GoesBang

    GoesBang Supporting Member

    The primers look similar to these after firing.

    1,000's of reloaders bust Glock 40 S&W brass. The caution is to owners of pre-3rd generation Glock 22/23 pistols.

    [​IMG]
     
  6. GoesBang

    GoesBang Supporting Member

    Here's one of my videos.

    ][ame]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=abAkJQ6Koho&feature=youtu.be[/ame]
     
  7. lklawson

    lklawson Staff Member

    Why?

    I recall that early versions of these models did not have fully supported chambers, but I'm unclear on why de-bulging brass makes it more dangerous. My best guess is that it is because of work-hardening the brass, making it weaker in that spot, and thus more prone to blowout failures.

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk
     
  8. GoesBang

    GoesBang Supporting Member

    Bingo! Saved me explaining it.
     
  9. lklawson

    lklawson Staff Member

    Is annealing the brass a good option or is it just not worth the trouble?

    This is strictly to satisfy my curiosity. I don't own a .40S&W anything or any Glocks, never mind a Gen 1-2 22/23.

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk
     
  10. greg_r

    greg_r Lifetime Supporter

    8,932
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    I anneal brass when I form cases, keeps them from splitting. I would not otherwise.
     
  11. GoesBang

    GoesBang Supporting Member

    I've never read of anyone annealing pistol brass.
     
  12. lklawson

    lklawson Staff Member

    If the only time you'd do it is with a high-pressure cartridge and a partially unsupported chamber, then I'd be a little surprised if it was a common occurrence. :D

    My curiosity is piqued. Off to google!

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk
     
  13. lklawson

    lklawson Staff Member

    The subject seems to come up, though somewhat infrequently. No solid answers regarding the .40S&W. Did come across a few who claim they anneal their .38SPL and .357 Magnum.

    Also came across one thread which claimed that annealing (rifle) brass doesn't actually increase longevity.

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk
     
  14. noylj

    noylj Member

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    9
    The thing is, if the bulge is so large that you can easily see it (and I'm talking about--Oh my God, look at this pregnant case), the case has been stressed and removing the bulge does not remove the stress (and annealing won't either--the brass is damaged and the web is weakened).
    So, if I see a bulge, I scrap the case. If I don't, I Bulge Bust just to prevent problems.
     
  15. greg_r

    greg_r Lifetime Supporter

    8,932
    6,444
    Annealing brass will increase case life and increase accuracy if It is done correctly. Brass hardens when you work it, annealing softens it. Brass should be "hard" at the base and "soft" at the neck. Soften the base and all of a sudden your safe loads become overloads.

    Probably the most common way to anneal brass, and the way I was taught, is to put your cases in water, heat the neck area with a torch, then knock the case over. That's really not a good way as the brass will seldom be annealed the same all the way around. A better way is to hold the base of the brass in your hand and turn it while you heat it. Slow, laborious, and tough on your fingers!

    The best is to use a dedicated tool. I had access to one back when I was active in IHMSA that would do about 20 cases at a time. CRT makes a tool that attaches to the primer pocket and chucks in a screwdriver that is pretty interesting.

    The last time I anneled any cases was when making 8 mm Mauser cases from 30/06, and that was just to keep the case body from splitting when it became the neck. Really wasn't necessary. I have made several thousand 300 Blackout cases from 223/5.56 and never annealed the first one. No problems so far either.

    In all honesty, most people will never have the need to anneal.
     
    Last edited: Apr 1, 2016
  16. lklawson

    lklawson Staff Member

    Sometimes I wish our BBS system had more than just "like." A "Useful Post" rating for things like your post makes more sense than "Like."

    Peace favor your sword,
    Kirk
     
  17. I use a BB for uniformity. Since I do not use hot loads I do not get the Glock bulge, even with cases fired in the Glock. Most of my rounds will go through the buster with no effort.

    I keep my loads well under maximum pressure, somewhere around 20K to 24K. The lower pressure not only saves wear, and tear on the gun, it makes the gun more fun to shoot.
     
  18. Pablo

    Pablo Carbine Guy aka Zippy Member

    I bought one last year. I haven't used it for 40S&W or 10mm. I forgot I had it and found it in with my various decapper parts (?). Then I remembered again when I saw this thread! Interesting enough I also have an undersize 10mm 40S&W sizing die. Brand new.
     
  19. greg_r

    greg_r Lifetime Supporter

    8,932
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    Thanks for the kind words Kirk!

    Been doing this a long time. Learned a lot from my grandfather who was a watchmaker and gunsmith. I wish I had more of his knowledge!
     
  20. welderman

    welderman Member

    Ok. You're all most there.
    I haven't annealed any cases yet. But you guys are getting me to the point of getting in trouble with the Boss Lady!:D