Lee case length trimmer vs euro brass

Discussion in 'Reloading Room' started by GoesBang, Jun 1, 2015.

  1. GoesBang

    GoesBang Supporting Member

    I recently de-capped 600+ 9mm casings. I used a Lyman case length gauge to sort out the long cases.

    The majority were Sellier & Bellot and a few were Tula BrassMaxx. None of them fit easily on the Lee trimmer. I chucked them.

    Anyone else run into this before?

    Regardless, I know which two brands of factory ammo I will be avoiding in the future.

    If I can't reload it. I'm not going to shoot it.
     
  2. SWO1

    SWO1 Member

    I have the brass for 9mm, dies, and prep tools. Dont have a 9mm pistol so havent reloaded any yet. I use the Lee zip trim. Its a die that I have in a single stage press. Consists of a barrel that is caliber specific and blades that are adjustable. I have one for my .38 Super that the 9mm brass will fit in. Same necking specs as they both use the same bullet. Havnt sorted them yet as to brand but will get some out and try them. Others that shoot on my range use every brand there is so Im sure I have some of what you had trouble with. I will try some of these and see if they go thru the Zip Trim OK.
     

  3. greg_r

    greg_r Lifetime Supporter

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    I have never loaded any S&B, but I have loaded a LOT of brass max. Never any problems.
     
  4. rickm

    rickm Member

    has never seen the need to trim a straight wall pistol case but then im not shooting 100 yard competition with a pistol either.
     
  5. ajole

    ajole Supporting Member

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    I've been setting up a lot of .223 recently, there have been a good number that just don't want to easily slip into or out of the Lee shell holder, both the one in the .223 dies, or the one from the universal set. I can't find any burrs, extractor gouges, or other reason for it, and it's not primers or anything else there. Brand doesn't seem to make any difference either.
     
  6. GoesBang

    GoesBang Supporting Member

    You probably don't use any kind of crimp on them either. I use the factory crimp die even on my straight walled brass.
     
  7. FlashBang

    FlashBang I Stand With Talon Lifetime Supporter

    Check the case rim thickness. I have been finding .223 cases that have a slightly thicker case rim that makes them tight in the Lee shell holder.

    .
     
  8. FlashBang

    FlashBang I Stand With Talon Lifetime Supporter

    Check the case rim thickness. I found there is a slight difference between some Euro ammo and American. I found this when I had issues with extraction in a CZ-50. :)

    .
     
  9. GoesBang

    GoesBang Supporting Member

    The shell holder is fine. The walls are too thick to fit the cutter end.
     
  10. rickm

    rickm Member

    Yes i used the FC die on every caliber i reload pistol and rifle
     
  11. greg_r

    greg_r Lifetime Supporter

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    I trim any that I use a roll crimp on. Once usually does it though.
     
  12. ajole

    ajole Supporting Member

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    I don't understand this.

    Do you mean the length gauge won't fit inside the shell?
     
  13. GoesBang

    GoesBang Supporting Member

    That is correct. I tossed close to 30 casings in the garbage.

    On the positive side I did manage to bring this home today. They are now primed and ready for powder and bullets.

    [​IMG]
     
  14. moona11

    moona11 King of you Monkeys Lifetime Supporter

    I don't trim straight cases so its never been an issue. I have all the trimmers for them just never use them
     
  15. GoesBang

    GoesBang Supporting Member

    Well I wouldn't have, but they didn't fit the Lyman gauge.
     
  16. ajole

    ajole Supporting Member

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    I'd have run them through the carbide sizer die...bet they'd have worked fine in the trimmer, then.;)
     
  17. MXGreg

    MXGreg Supporting Member

    The problem I've seen with Tula 9mm cases is you'll see flash holes that are way off center. Any farther and they'd be outside the primer pocket. Makes using the Lee trimmer impossible.
     
  18. moona11

    moona11 King of you Monkeys Lifetime Supporter

    Why trim straight walls? If your using them for range ammo. If you are a competition shooter maybe but its not that big of a deal. At most I reload brass 7 times and that's with mild loads.
     
  19. greg_r

    greg_r Lifetime Supporter

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    Just to make sure all the cases are the same length and the crimps are consistent. They are usually only trimmed once though, as they tend to stay consistent. I have some 38 spl, 45 ar and some 45/70 that have been loaded numerous times and will in good shape.

    I don't trim anything I load for my semiautomatics though, 25acp, 380acp, 9mm, 40s&w, or 45acp, These are replaced by attrition anyway as I generally lose about 20% of them anyway. I think the brass fairy gets them :confused:. As long as they fit in the case gauge.
     
  20. noylj

    noylj Member

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    So, why are you increasing head space by trimming 9x19 cases? Head space in on the case mouth and you are increasing head space by 0.010" or so. Have you EVER read any one recommending such a thing for accuracy?
    Your best accuracy will be with those longer cases that you are ruining by trimming. Unless the case exceeds max length (and I have never found one that was even AT max length), you are playing the benchrest bottleneck case "consistency" game (where head space in on the shoulder, which they are careful to NOT move) with the wrong cartridge.
    1) you aren't shooting a 0.25 MOA gun, but a >6 MOA gun (and, I would guess, a >12MOA gun).
    2) increasing head space has never been a path to accuracy.
    Strangest thing in the past 10 years has been the "need" for so many to spend time cleaning what doesn't need cleaning and trimming what doesn't need trimming.
    3) I have NEVER found any increased accuracy by trimming even rimmed cases for a more consistent roll crimp. There simply is no reason to even worry about a consistent taper crimp, as it isn't even a crimp to begin with.