M1 Carbine

Discussion in 'General Firearms Discussion' started by mr_flintstone, Mar 31, 2016.

  1. mr_flintstone

    mr_flintstone Supporting Member

    I love these guns, and I thought about buying one of the new Auto Ordnance models several times, but I've read bad things about their quality control. I recently came upon a new production Inland model. I didn't even know they were still around. Anyway, does anyone know about their quality? They run about $1000 more or less. The AO model is around $700. If the Inlands are as good as the 40s-50s model USGI guns, I'd buy one for that price.
     
  2. Earnshaw

    Earnshaw Member

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    Last edited: Mar 31, 2016

  3. I have an Auto Ordnance and have no issues with it. They recommend 300 rounds to loosen the spring but i had no issues even during the break in period and i shoot the cheap steel case ammo
     
  4. Dane

    Dane Supporting Member

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    I have seen plenty of M1 Carbines around for well under $800

    Here is one example of a Universal brand:
     

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  5. FirearmFanatic

    FirearmFanatic "The Enabler!"

    What site is that on? I may be interested in that.
     

  6. Did you notice it was a Universal, not an Inland, AO or USGI.
     
  7. ArmyRover

    ArmyRover Supporting Member

    x2 unless it has been mauled by a bear that is interesting.
     
  8. ArmyScout

    ArmyScout Supporting Member

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    Universal Firearms started out as Bullseye in 1950, and later changed their name to Universal Firearms. They were bought by Iver Johnson in 1983, who were then bought by American Military Arms Corp (AMAC) in 1987. Universals were popular due to their low price, and many people bought them from hardware stores, Sears, Wards, and other local gun sources back when Americans could buy guns in their neighborhoods.
    The third generation included cost saving designs that started the company's reputation for poor quality. Changes included a slide lock lever by the rear sight, the trigger housing was made of aluminum, and several safety features were deleted to reduce costs. This resulted in the ability of the rifle to fire out of battery. They are no longer being made. And never were considered a top quality firearm.
    SN 176xxx and 187xxx. Buyer beware.
     
  9. MachoMelvin

    MachoMelvin Well-Known Member

    I would prefer the AO over the Universal, if for only the availability of spare parts. It may not be original, but from what I have read, the originals had issues too?
     
  10. MXGreg

    MXGreg Supporting Member

    This thread came along just in time. I was at my LGS on Thursday to pick up some primers. I spotted a M1 on the rack and took a look at it. It was priced at $275! It's a Universal and appears to be a later one. I didn't get the serial number but it has the metal upper hand guard and the little lever under the rear sight to lock the bolt back.

    At first I was excited, but now I think I'll pass on it.
     
  11. FirearmFanatic

    FirearmFanatic "The Enabler!"

    I dont know a whole lot about them. But, at that price I believe I would have bought it anyway. If not to keep, at least for resale.
     
  12. MXGreg

    MXGreg Supporting Member

    I'm sure it's still there. My LGS is very off the beaten path. I might go take a second look at it tomorrow.
     
  13. Dane

    Dane Supporting Member

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    That is from Cash America Pawn. Last I was told it was on police hold!
     

  14. I'm not too sure just what "police hold" means. Is that something to do with pawn shops only? :confused:
     
  15. Dane

    Dane Supporting Member

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    Possibly, Something came up on the item that police have them hold it and not sell. Possibly was stolen, etc.
     
  16. FirearmFanatic

    FirearmFanatic "The Enabler!"

    I am not sure how things work around there. But in my area, pawn shops are required to hold an item for 30 days no matter what it is before they can sell it.
     
  17. A couple of weeks ago my youngest brother picked one up for that kind of money at a LGS back home. He called me and responded like you posted here.

    I didn't get a chance to look at it last weekend or ask if it's a late model or not. When he picked it up the dealer had a H&R 999 and he snapped that up. That became the new gun excitement.

    I have a early model Universal that has given me no problems. A guy here in town has had a late model for years that he bought new and has put 1,000s of rounds thru without a problem, but these are less than max reloads that use a 1/2 jacket bullet he sewages himself. He's gone thru more than a 5 gallon pail of jackets.
     
  18. Earnshaw

    Earnshaw Member

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    Maybe a bit off topic here but....... With the M1 Carbine having some degree of popularity with the buying public, at least enough to prompt several later day replicas/reproductions , including a 9mm variant by Chiappa, why doesn't Ruger, instead of marketing yet another entry level AR in an already glutted market bring back the PC9/PC4 carbines?
    These could be given the same treatment Talo has ordered up for the 10-22 in their recent M1 Carbine sorta resembling gun.
     

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  19. Dane

    Dane Supporting Member

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    They have to hold all items sold to them before they can sell a min time too. If an item gets flagged as possibly stolen or some other issue than a hold is placed on it so it doesn't leave the shop. This one it would seem was out for sale then a hold placed on it. For it to have been on clearance I am guessing they had it 90 days or more.
     
  20. ajole

    ajole Supporting Member

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    If you talk to enough people, every surplus gun ever made had issues, as did every Dodge, Ford or Chevy truck, depending on who is talking.;)

    I mean, if the gun was perfect, why did they replace it?:rolleyes:
    People tend to be a bit simplistic about these things.:cool: