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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys I took your advise and did not buy the PSL, but instead bought a M1 Garand. This is to be my main semi auto hunting rifle. I have not gotten the rifle yet, its on the way, i've only seen pictures. So is their anything I should look for on the rifle. I already have a savage 30/06 in which I shoot winchester super X 165 grain PSP, and the federal 180 grain softpoint out of, are these rounds safe to shoot in a M1. I have read some rounds are not safe to shoot because of the gas valve. I was courious if any of you could recomend a new gas valve to change out that would allow me to shoot these rounds. I have also seen ramline synthetic stocks for these guns, Do these stocks function well or are they not worth the money.
Thanks Kira.
P.S. any other accesories you think are worth it please do not hestiate to say.
 

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I'd say leave a fine weapon like an M1 in the configuration it comes in. The main thing I'd check is the bore to make sure it's still in good shape. Other than that I don't know a whole lot about the Garand action (I don't have one, they cost over $1k here :() so I'm not sure what to look for to make sure it's safe to operate.

BTW this probably should be in the C&R section :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Well I like the way it looks now, but the stock is what made the price so low because it has a deep gouge in it and many scratches. I like the synthetic because it is 2inches shorter than the wood stock and has no marks. I dont think the gun is really a C&R because it is new production and was made in the 90's.
 

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Check the muzzle for worn out rifling, those old steel cleaning rods and a war or two often removed the rifling at the muzzle. Also check the fit of the gas piston to the cylinder, wear here allows gas blowby and short stroking. There is an adjustable system available for the Garand, but it is not a real fix. The issue isn't too much port pressure, the rifle was designed to fire ammunition with a certain pressure curve, if you fire some commercial loads in it the operating rod cycles too violently and can bend or break. The op-rod is also known to crack in a few spots, the later ones were machined differently to prevent stress risers from forming.

Hornady just came out with a new "Garand safe" load, and Federal American Eagle 150gr is similar to M2 Ball ammo, which was the issued load for the Garand. Most reloading books also list a few "Garand loads".

Adjustable gas system:
http://www.mccannindustries.com/scope/parts.html

Hornady match Garand load:
http://www.hornady.com/story.php?s=793
 

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also find out who the maker of the gun was. some of the shady repro people used out of spec parts to throw together franken guns.

SW
quoted for truth

Stay away from the plastic stocks. From what I have seen, they don't seem to fit/bed well. If your rifle is a repro, not an original stock, and already damaged, have it cut down to fit. Then pick up a nice CMP replacement stock to keep around in case you want to make it a looker again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the help guys, the pictures of the metal and blueing on the gun are beatiful. The stock is however firewood to me. I will look into refinishing it, I think it will be a nice project. Have any of you had experience with cutting down a garand stock? I have also found two gas plugs for sale a schuster and the mccann. I am leaning towards the shuster do to its cheaper price and it seems kinda similar to adujst like the plug on my saiga 12. Thanks Kira,
 
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